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Poetry Prompts Freeforall

7:46 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Weather Channel… again… all those snow storms

Hello, everyone. Grab your coffee, your notebook and a writing implement and let’s get going.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us Rachel Wetzsteon. I am loving meeting poets I don’t know. The poem Donna shares with us made me note the link. I want to read more. The prompts involve natural occurrences and questions. Head over to read them.

In resonance seven, Joseph asks us to look at our natural surroundings. He calls the exercise an exercise in restraint as much as an exploration of theme So go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele wants us to look at loss, but not big losses. She says, let’s consider a leaving or a letting go that was not devastating and perhaps even for the best Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions, tips, and examples, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara introduces us to artist Leslie Holt and her Hello series. I spent quite some time trying to decide which one I wanted. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a colour photograph of a building in a Disney lot. The interplay of light and shadow, alone, is a poem. Unless you have an immediate idea, go over the photograph and jot down all the details that you notice and go from there. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Laurie Kolp, at Poetry Jam, suggests we write an Olympian poem and provides us with a definition that gives us a wide scope. Head over to see what she says.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday several of her posts, this week, offer photo challenges to write about, so I have given you the general address. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review suggests we create some erasure poetry from Patterson’s thriller and detective novels. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have moving, shopping, and an ode to a household object. Visit.

I love reading Herotomost‘s prompts. I almost copied the whole because he’s fun, so go over to imaginary garden with real toads, and at least read the prompt! In part, he says, I want you to be cheesy, lusty, rapturous, obsessed, candid, fun, belligerent or awkward.  I want the real face of love, clumsy and heady, obtuse and full of blushing. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems-bannerAt We Write Poems Neil wants us to deal with 1,000 birds. To read his explanation, go on over.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at leaders and leadership. Head over to read the two spark quotes Susan gives us.

Over at dVerse, Victoria talks about the object poem. Go on over to see what she says. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

At Flashy Fiction Friday Walt Wojtanik has an interesting exercise built around our personality traits. Check it out.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 21/02/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Weathered In

8:29 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Weather Channel

Hello, everyone. Look out NE United States. Here comes Pax! And, lordy, you have a possible follow-up. No name yet, but it’s moving fast. As long as you are avoiding shoveling, visit ALL the prompt sites. Try a few things that are out of your comfort zone. It’ll keep you warm.

Breaking News: Joseph Harker and Tessa Racked are heaving themselves out of the primeval muck… too graphic? Joseph and Tessa have recouped since tenderly laying Curio to rest and have a new journal CSHS. Visit to see what it’s about and don’t worry if you do not have the time; I will devote next Thursday’s post to CSHS.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us Sally Rosen Kindred. The example poem is a wonderful one from the point of view of Tinkerbell. The prompts offer a couple of possibilities: a persona poem, or a poem dealing with a specific set of sounds. Head over.

In resonance six, Joseph describes the process as poetry in the future perfect.  I promise, the process is easier than it may sound. Follow Joseph’s directions and you are good to go. So go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele takes on the modern love poem. She’s the only one I know who not only tells us how to avoid the overly sentimental and cliché, but gives us many possibilities of directions to take. Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions, tips, and examples, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara asks for poems of pattern, and upsetting expectation. The spark is Frost’s ‘Fire and Ice’. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a  black and white photograph that bears studying. Unless you have an immediate idea, go over the photograph and jot down all the details that you notice and go from there. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, creates his prompt around one of my favourite poem subjects [I’m not kidding]: dandelions. Head over to see what he says.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday her Valentine subject is a turkey. What? Well, visit and see what she says. Gorgeous photos. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Too much fun! Even if I don’t get a poem I am trying this one! The Found Poetry Review asks us to write a surrealist poem based on what you hear on the radio. There are specific steps. Stop by and read about it. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have your neighbourhood, creative business, and ekphrasis. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Margaret gives us a prompt based on the work of artist Toril Fisher. Margaret says: For this challenge, please use these images for inspiration to promote Toril’s desire to begin a conversation about the beauty and interconnectedness all living creatures share with our amazing Mother Earth.  Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems-bannerAt We Write Poems Neil starts with: This week I have been thinking about brothers, sisters, things unknown and unsaid, black and white photographs become sepia old. For his elucidation, go on over.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at heart. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Tony Maude introduces us to Bouts-rimés. The form entails working with a provided set of end words. I can tell you it is wildly fun. I stopped what I was doing to give it a try. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flashy Fiction Friday in the person of Rob Halpin gives us a photograph and a direction with The Olympics. Visit the newly furbished site and have a look around.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for the next in a series of prompts; Thursday for a look at CSHS; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 14/02/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: They Followed Me Home, Ma

7:53 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Spirit in the Sky, sung by Norman Greenbaum

Hello, everyone. All present and accounted for? Then, let’s find us some prompts.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us Kristin LaTour. I’ve known her name as long as I have known Donna’s, which is as long as my blogging career. While they know each other, I came to them separately as writers. The prompt Donna offers is one of my favourites: take the end words from LaTour’s poem and create a new poem. Head over.

In resonance five, Joseph says we need to go to a space where you interact with others and to put your ears on, collect phrases to mine and grab hold of the little root-hairs of association that even common phrases tossed around near you can have, and follow them, up the roots, into their trunks and branches. The procedure he outlines is fascinating, so go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele discusses personification and gives us several prompt possibilities Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions, tips, and examples, of which she always has many.

Never heard of a soundsuit? I MUST have one of the horses — watch the last video for a couple of minutes, or the whole thing! The horses are mesmerising. At Qweekly, Barbara has given us  a number of videos and instructed us to put on our own soundsuit. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a  black and white photograph that I find fascinating, to the point that I sat and looked for quite a while before coming back here. There’s something about it. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Gabriella, at Poetry Jam, wants us to write a tribute poem. She gives Maya Angelou’s tribute poem to Mandela as the focus for her set up. Head over to see what she says.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday while her theme is a singing day, I love that she arrived at this joyful thought through her dyslexic reading of something else. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

We all like the thought of cutting up words and mixing them, don’t we? There is something about scissors and a page. The Found Poetry Review’s prompt asks for a cut up poem in honour of William Burroughs who championed this form. Stop by and read about it. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have interviews, super bowls, and laughter. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Marian gives us a prompt based on the work of Laurie Anderson. Don’t remember her? Head over and have a listen and read a bit about her work. Go play with the toads.

I do love Neil’s prompts. They open so many pathways. At We Write Poems we are instructed to watch a video to put ourselves in the needed frame of mind to read the rest of the prompt. Intrigued? Well, what are you waiting for? Go.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at love. Susan adds an interesting twist by asking us to pick One Age to speak from. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Gay Reiser Cannon discusses songwriting and its relationship to poetry. Her articles are always interesting. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flashy Fiction Friday gives a prompt that is short and sweet. Walt presents a topic on which to write, a main character, a key object and a setting. Visit the newly furbished site and have a look around.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for the first in a series of prompts; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
6 Comments

Posted by on 07/02/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity

8:04 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Mick McGuire sung by The Clancy Brothers

Hello, all. New people, welcome. Thursdays are off and on, depending on whether I have links for you, or a point of discussion. I am more than happy to have you send me either, or both. For today: Many of us have been grousing about dry spells [I don’t even know where my daily notebook is], so I have two articles that might help, and a laugh for you.

1] We have read many of Patrick Ross’ posts, on his site The Artist’s Road. This particular one caught my eye because of its title: Turning Your To-Do List Upside Down. Okay, I bit. The article is short and to the point: how to have your to do lists not be a source of stress, but a source of support. He makes an interesting point and if it helps, then Hallelujah. If it isn’t for you, at least you have read a beautifully written article.

2] This next article is about a topic we are all familiar with, but may not have really worked at, in a while: How To Create An Inspirational Workspace For Writing, written by Laura Carlin and Alison Forbes and posted at Write to Done, another site you see often, here. It’s presented as a 12 step program and has a couple of points I hadn’t considered. I write out of my recliner so many of these points would have to be adapted, but I like the idea. Hie your way over and see whether you can spring clean your work space.

3] Okay, grammarphiles, this next site is a gallery that shows grammar and punctuation art. I am not kidding. Oxford comma fans, you’ll need to click on the painting to see what it says… chortle. Grammarphobes, you can’t stand it, can you? You have to go look.

That’s it. I will see you tomorrow for the weekly roundup of prompts; and, Tuesday for the first in a series of body prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 06/02/2014 in links, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Snow Day

9:33 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Over the Rainbow sung by Iz

Hello, everyone. Don’t laugh at poor Atlanta. Yes, my husband has his third snow day and there is no snow in sight. We are choosing to imagine the outlying towns as having problems still. I know many of you are up to your eyebrows. While you wait for the thaw, write. Be sure to check the Flash Fiction at the end. There have been changes!

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us the poet Kenneth Hart and two prompts, one that uses the last line of the Hart poem as a start point and the other, the focus of the poem, which you must visit to read.

In resonance four, Joseph takes us through the steps of a narrative poem. If you have shied away from writing one, give this a try. Don’t worry about how good it is, just follow the steps. Then you can worry it. Head over.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda took the words from a reflection piece I’m working on as part of my formal evaluation at school. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele had far too much fun making up the menu! This week involves a dinner party with a different take. Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions and tips, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara has given us a very different assignment involving sound. And, then there’s the bonus in the form of a photograph. Visit. try it.

We Write Poems  has thrown its hat into the wordle ring with We Wordle. Their wordles are different from Brenda’s so check them out. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways. I got caught by the first two in comments and stayed awhile.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a  lovely Andrew Wyeth painting, one that will resonate with many, at the moment. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, wants us to write a poem about where we are. She sets it up in a clever way. Imagine us all sitting around the world, at the same time [roughly] writing the poem… Head over.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday she gives us two photographs and an adage as starting points. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt asks for a remix or erasure from a fascinating source, How to Analyze People On Sight. This should provide particular fun to finding poems. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have others’ words, historical flash fiction, and invisible forces. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I was torn, but the challenge involved in Mama Zen‘s got me [and you can look at Hannah‘s anyway]. It is surprising how much can be said in 140 characters. Go over for a look. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Elizabeth gives us a link to a fabulous site. You could get lost for hours. Visit to see what she wants us to do with a visit to the site.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at hunger. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Samuel Peralta says goodbye. He has been a wonderful teacher. Go on over and read his goodbye post where he asks for a prose poem and gives a link for an occasional newsletter. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. The bartenders are telecommuting this week so drinks are virtual.

Flash fiction fans: There have been changes. Flashy Fiction has married up with Poetic Bloomings and can be found with a new prompt each Friday, with the last Friday being devoted to an instruction, a discussion or an exercise. This week, a photograph. Visit the newly furbished site and have a look around.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for the first in a series of prompts; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on 31/01/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Write a Poem and Then Another

8:07 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Up On Cripple Creek sung by The Band

Hello, everyone. National Poetry Month is only two and a bit months away so dive in and start writing.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us the poet Richard Berlin and an interesting prompt, to match the poem she chose, that asks us to Use that object as a controlling image in a poem about that person. To find out what image and what person, visit.

In resonance three, Joseph asks us to consider the interplay of colours. He gives a step by step that takes us through the setting up of the poem and throws in a challenge. Head over.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda suggests we digest the words. It’s a good strategy, allowing the words to work their way around, while they marinate. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is asking us to step out of the box in considering making a flip decision about something important. Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions and tips, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara has given us two prompts for this week, both of which look fun, especially the other one.

We Write Poems  has thrown its hat into the wordle ring with We Wordle. Their wordles are different from Brenda’s so check them out. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for?  Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a black and white photograph Musician in the Rain by Robert Doisneau. Although it’s not meant to be, there is an element of comedy to the subject that you might allow into your poem. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, tells us to spend some time cloud watching. Okay, she doesn’t actually say that but you can. Head over.

carolOn Carol’s Wonder Wednesday she gives us two photographs to suggest connectedness. Visit to see what she says about it. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt asks for a remix from songs in the Top Forty. I took a small break that turned into a long break to start looking at lyrics. Then I was caught by a suggested article… Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have etymology, forgiveness, and protest. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, it’s Fireblossom time and she would like us to play dress-up.To read what she really wants us to do with clothes, head over. Her commentary has a ton of photos we can use, as well. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Elizabeth tells us that she came to poetry through the prophets of the Old Testament, who often spoke in metaphors and similes. Head over to see what she suggests we do.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at mirrors. Head over to read what Susan says about it and the poems she has for us.

Over at dVerse, Brian gives us storytelling. It’s what we do, right? Go on over and see what he says, then do as he suggests: tell a story. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Hut buttered rum on offer.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 24/01/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Here We Are Again

7:45 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Love Potion No. 9 sung by The Searchers

Hello, everyone. Welcome to all the new people who are following. We’re a friendly group so if you have questions, ask. I would also like to welcome back, for however long they are here, my two lead-offs, Donna and Joseph.

Donna of Put Words Together. Make Meaning. says of her new incarnation: Once a week, I will introduce a poem by a poet that is not considered “widely read” or with whom I have had little experience, offer some insight into what I appreciated about/learned from that particular poem, offer suggestions for further reading (both online and in book form), and perhaps even provide a writing or revision prompt based on the poem. Her first post gives us Karen Solie. What are you waiting for? Visit.

Joseph, of Naming Constellations, has returned with another R round of prompts, Resonance. We’re already at 2, so if you missed the first one, be sure to scroll down to it. He says of the new year: There’s not going to be a particular structure or theme to the prompts, and I may not always give an example poem of my own, but I’ll do my best to keep them up through the year. Those who have been with Joseph know that his prompts are  exercises in fun [okay, maybe a little hair pulling], but if followed can produce surprises. Resonance two begins with music. Head over.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda says, This week’s words came from a paper that a student wrote last week. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele asks us to consider differing perspectives or points of view, different memories of the same experience, and other situations in which “things” may be seen from two sides. To find out what she suggests we do, head over. Adele, as usual, gives many suggestions, as well as links to example poems.

Barbara is back with prompts at Qweekly, so head over and check them out. She has given us two prompts for this week, both of which look fun, especially the other one.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for?  Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us an incredible photograph of a lighthouse off the coast of Brittany. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Laurie, at Poetry Jam, challenges us with refrigerate/refrigerator. Head over to read what she says. Irrelevancy: I had the image she shows, of the running refrigerator, on my classroom whiteboard, for years.

carolOn Carol’s Wonder Wednesday she tells us to use her chosen images and words as a doorway. Today she gives us a photograph with a poem by Wendell Berry. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt, this week, asks for a remix from StoryCorps archives. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have empathy, listening, and emotional rescues. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Brendan’s prompt only went up Wednesday and has 29 responses so far. Clearly the prompt works well, so go see what it’s about. I will tell you that it involves a word list from a Plath poem.Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Elizabeth has us looking into the meanings of zodiac signs. Visit to find out why.

At Poets United, Verse First does not appear to be present [I’m telling you, I only turned my back for a couple of weeks], but something called Poets United Mid-Week Motif looks like it will work fine as a prompt. The motif this week is equality. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Victoria takes on active verbs. As I am slightly passionate on the topic, I didn’t even look at other offerings, so look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Hut buttered rum on offer.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a word prompt; possibly Thursday, if anything comes to light; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 17/01/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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