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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Here We Go

7:34 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Vivaldi

Hello, all. Ready for a week full of possibilities? Not everyone is back up and running, so I’ll leave markers.

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We have a new contender: Sepia Saturday, a site that has been up since 2009! Their thing is photographs, old ones, yours or theirs. Head over and be sure to read ‘Ask Auntie Miriam’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a guest prompter who says ‘the best love poems walk right up to the edge of sentimentality but don’t go over the cliff. Here are four ideas for ways to enter the tricky terrain of the love poem’. Visit to read her ideas [I don’t know why the font has shrunk; nor will it unshrink]

Red Wolf Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt.

Never written a limerick? What are you waiting for? There is an art to writing one that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], we have Chair With the Wings of a Vulture, 1960, a sculpture by Salvador Dali. I thought I had seen most of his work. Clearly not. Have fun with this one. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Laurie Kolp, at Poetry Jam, invites us to join in the festivities. So, go.

carol  Hip replacement happening here. Hopefully, Carol will be her rocking self soon.

 

At the Found Poetry Review they are recovering from a month of setting and writing to 30 prompts. If you don’t know about Oulipo, head over and read some of the prompts and poems and give it a try, yourself.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have flowers, through a child’s eyes, and mama.Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I have met a new artist to love. Go on over to see who Fireblossom gives us for inspiration. Go play with the toads.

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The Poets United Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is looking at children. Head over to read what Susan suggests we do.

dverseOver at dVerse, Meeting the Bar presents us with conversational poetry. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

I love Walt’s presentation of today’s post at Flashy Fiction Friday: Homecoming. Go see what he has us coming home from.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post and leave your links with them!

I shall see you Tuesday for a doors and windows prompt; Thursday for the summer calendar; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, everyone.

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Posted by on 09/05/2014 in poetry

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Bring it on NaPoWriMo

10:03 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Say When sung by The Fray

Hello, there. This is the last Freeforall until May. Should you still want to check out sites and don’t want to bookmark a whole lot of places, pin the link to this post to your blog and you’ll be able to navigate from there. Should I suddenly go silent, I haven’t fallen off the earth. I’m at my mother’s where connectivity is an issue. Enjoy April, everyone.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, introduces us to Franki Elliot. whose poem ‘Piano Rats’ does the same for my poetic sensibilities as to Donna’s: I’m a sucker for poems that make leaps I can follow, and a double sucker for poems that can do this with attention to detail. Both prompts are cool. I know, not helpful, but you need to read what this poem does; then you’ll see: the prompts are cool and will result in stretching.

Hmmm. I could have sworn I saw resonance eleven come through my inbox. Apparently not. I suspect we have lost Joseph for the next few weeks, although he does say the prompts will continue. I have given you Naming Constellations’ general address to check on.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen plus one. Yep, two weeks of baker’s dozens. Must be an omen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a fascinating prompt to do with literary locations. Not only does she give us her usual tips, and example poems, but also, several possible locations. Me, I want to work with Enid Blyton’s Wishing Chair place! Not on the list but popped into my head. Go on over.

At Quickly, Barbara is getting us ready for April. She will be one of the providers of prompts during the longest thirty days of the year. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt.

There is an art to writing a limerick that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], we have a photograph, My Bed by Tracey Emin.  Ask yourself, What’s the story? Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

At Poetry Jam, Laurie talks about the recent loss of her mother and fashions a prompt for us dealing with letting go, a difficult topic, one which many of us are facing in the next few years. Visit.

carolI love Carols prompt this week.I laughed a couple of times [yes, at the photograph, Carol, but I laughed with you], as I read the back-story. Wonder Wednesday talks about another kind of ‘selfie‘. Head over to check it out.

This week’s prompt at the Found Poetry Review is their last regular one until May. They ask us to take on the Transcendentalists. Stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres, work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have earliest memories, lost & found, and new forms. Visit.toad garden2 ocal

At imaginary garden with real toads, Margaret has a neat prompt to do with flowers. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems-bannerAt We Write Poems Irene waxes philosophical about childhood. She asks interesting questions. Head over to read.

The Poets United Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is two languages. Don’t panic. You know more than you think. Don’t forget the language of art, carpentering, boating, maths… Head over to read what Susan suggests we do.dverse

Ah, yes, rhythm. At dVerse, Tony Maude holds our hands through blank verse and metre. Read. Bookmark. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Unless you live in Texas, the ice was put away and we’re looking at toddies again. Good grief, weather.

Whoops! I beat Flashy Fiction Fridayand its newest posting. I gave you the general address. The prompt should be up soon.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post to them!

I shall see you Tuesday for the first of thirty days. OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, everyone.

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Posted by on 28/03/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Aprille is i’cumen in

9:11 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to John Whelan’s album Celtic Crossroads

Ahhh, Coffee! Hi, everyone. Nine days and counting, ’til the mad month of writing a poem every day for thirty days [or, insane, if you are Joseph Harker, who will write two a day — granted he’s young]. This next week you might grab a prompt for every day and start getting your brain in gear. You don’t have to post them so your brain won’t feel the pressure, but it will get used to the expectation.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, introduces us to Jake Adam York. When I reached the end of the poem Donna chose, I sighed. Then, I read what Donna says: Sigh. This poem is so tender, I actually sigh when I read it. The poem manages to be tender without being cliché. Donna’s prompts are to either write a poem that personifies a set of things she gives us, or to write a single sentence beginning with…Head over to read the poem and the possibilities. I’m going to pop over to Amazon and order one of his books.

In resonance ten, Joseph tells us, I think a lot of potential for poetry lives in the space created by the unexpected, whether positive or negative, major or minor; nobody wants to read a narrative that’s predictable, at least nobody I know. The prompt that ensues is fun. So go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen plus one. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele does what Adele does so well: she takes what can be a cliché topic and turns it on its head. To see what she suggests we try with the colour green, visit. She adds a suggestion to play with syntax and includes example poems.

At Quickly, Barbara is getting us ready for April. She will be one of the providers of prompts during the longest thirty days of the year. Visit for some practice in alchemy.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt.

There is an art to writing a limerick that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Included in the post is a link to a set of instructions that will lead you to write a limerick that might even hook you.

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], we have Feast in the House of Simon, 1610,  a painting by El Greco. The clothing is so sumptuous, I want to write about the material! Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, offers us owls.  I laughed at his phrase the silent assassin, as my brother, a few weeks ago, insists he was attacked by an owl, waiting for him on the roof of his house. Head over to see what Alan says. I particularly appreciate the instruction to: Let your mind be full of images and words and write whatever comes into you heart and overflows into your senses.

carolAt Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday she gives us a photograph of a subject that marks the end of winter for her. Visit to see the photo, read her haiku and to perhaps write your own end of winter poem.

Whup! You almost lost me here. I wanted to leap right in on this week’s prompt at the Found Poetry Review where we are given thoughts on art, and twitter as part of the mix to play with.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres, work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have music lessons, parades, and the saints. Visit.

Okay, I admit it: I adore herotomost, his prompts, I mean. No-one presents with quite his panache. On imaginary garden with real toads, he sets up a context for us and then gives us three possibilities, all of which sound fun [especially the one involving smores, although Lewis & Clark grab me. Then there are the ghost stories.] Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems-bannerAt We Write Poems Irene has instructions for a poem about our neck of the woods. To find out what she suggests, head over.

The Poets United Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is looking at birthdays. Head over to read what Susan suggests we do.

This is one of those weeks at dVerse, when we are spoiled for choice. I gave you the general address. Go on over and see what is a’borning for Spring. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. I hear the clink of ice. Gimlets, perhaps.

I love the title of today’s post at Flashy Fiction Friday: Impending Doom. How can anyone resist seeing what it’s about?

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post to them!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; Thursday for a couple of links; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, everyone.

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Posted by on 21/03/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: March Winds Are Coming

7:46 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Snow Patrol singing The Lightning Strike

Hi, everyone. I hope all goes well in your lives. If there are hiccups and bumps along the way, reading and writing poetry has a miraculous effect, so grab a prompt. Heck, grab a couple.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us Nina Corwin. Along with a poem by Corwin, Donna gives us a link to hear her read. If you have been curious about a good poem reader, here is one. We can learn a lot listening to her. The prompts involve four of Corwin’s line starters and unglamorous jobs. Head over to read them.

In resonance eight, Joseph uses chess as a process and no, you do not have to be able to play. As always, trust Joseph and follow his directions. They can take you to unexpected places. I found the exercise fascinating. So go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen plus one. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a guest blogger, Gail Gerwin. The topic is kinfolk. If nothing else, visit to read Gerwin’s poem and one by Helen Doré Watson. Both surprised exclamations from me. Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions, tips, and examples, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara has us playing with macro/micro, zooming in and zooming out. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

LOVE the image over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], Poet’s Sleep, 1989, by Chang Houg Ahn. The skulls! Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, has built her prompt around trains. Head over to see what she says.

carolOn Carol‘s Phoneography series she gives us an intriguing series of photographs where the shadows are almost more real than what casts them. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review is at AWP 2014, this week, so gives us the AWP schedule to remix, erase, cut up, or otherwise play with. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have recipes, Spring, and dramatic monologues. Visit.

On imaginary garden with real toads, we have a couple of possibilities for inspiration, so I have given the general address. The first involves rhyme [but not a difficult one… really] and art by Benda; the second, a song by Pink. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems-bannerAt We Write Poems Neil asks for a journal poem. At the end, he says, a journal poem done in this manner may also become a discovery process, allowing associations to be more visible.   (think finger-painting!). To read his explanation, go on over.

The Poets United Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is looking at success. Head over to read Susan’s quotes, watch part of the Sochi closing ceremony, and see what three poems inspire Susan re success.

There was a ripple in the Force earlier this week, when Brian announced that dVerse considered closing. To my/our great relief, they have restructured themselves, instead. This week at dVerse, Brian discusses characterisation in poems. Go on over to see what he says. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. They’re checking their stock for Spring.

As of 9:00 a.m. EST, Flashy Fiction Friday has not posted, so I’ll give you the general address. Check back for your weekly flash fiction.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for one of my favourite borrowed prompts prompt; Thursday for a couple of links; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

If I do not show for the next two weeks, there have been expected and unexpected family matters.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

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Posted by on 28/02/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall

7:46 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Weather Channel… again… all those snow storms

Hello, everyone. Grab your coffee, your notebook and a writing implement and let’s get going.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us Rachel Wetzsteon. I am loving meeting poets I don’t know. The poem Donna shares with us made me note the link. I want to read more. The prompts involve natural occurrences and questions. Head over to read them.

In resonance seven, Joseph asks us to look at our natural surroundings. He calls the exercise an exercise in restraint as much as an exploration of theme So go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele wants us to look at loss, but not big losses. She says, let’s consider a leaving or a letting go that was not devastating and perhaps even for the best Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions, tips, and examples, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara introduces us to artist Leslie Holt and her Hello series. I spent quite some time trying to decide which one I wanted. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a colour photograph of a building in a Disney lot. The interplay of light and shadow, alone, is a poem. Unless you have an immediate idea, go over the photograph and jot down all the details that you notice and go from there. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Laurie Kolp, at Poetry Jam, suggests we write an Olympian poem and provides us with a definition that gives us a wide scope. Head over to see what she says.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday several of her posts, this week, offer photo challenges to write about, so I have given you the general address. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review suggests we create some erasure poetry from Patterson’s thriller and detective novels. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have moving, shopping, and an ode to a household object. Visit.

I love reading Herotomost‘s prompts. I almost copied the whole because he’s fun, so go over to imaginary garden with real toads, and at least read the prompt! In part, he says, I want you to be cheesy, lusty, rapturous, obsessed, candid, fun, belligerent or awkward.  I want the real face of love, clumsy and heady, obtuse and full of blushing. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems-bannerAt We Write Poems Neil wants us to deal with 1,000 birds. To read his explanation, go on over.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at leaders and leadership. Head over to read the two spark quotes Susan gives us.

Over at dVerse, Victoria talks about the object poem. Go on over to see what she says. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

At Flashy Fiction Friday Walt Wojtanik has an interesting exercise built around our personality traits. Check it out.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 21/02/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Weathered In

8:29 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Weather Channel

Hello, everyone. Look out NE United States. Here comes Pax! And, lordy, you have a possible follow-up. No name yet, but it’s moving fast. As long as you are avoiding shoveling, visit ALL the prompt sites. Try a few things that are out of your comfort zone. It’ll keep you warm.

Breaking News: Joseph Harker and Tessa Racked are heaving themselves out of the primeval muck… too graphic? Joseph and Tessa have recouped since tenderly laying Curio to rest and have a new journal CSHS. Visit to see what it’s about and don’t worry if you do not have the time; I will devote next Thursday’s post to CSHS.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us Sally Rosen Kindred. The example poem is a wonderful one from the point of view of Tinkerbell. The prompts offer a couple of possibilities: a persona poem, or a poem dealing with a specific set of sounds. Head over.

In resonance six, Joseph describes the process as poetry in the future perfect.  I promise, the process is easier than it may sound. Follow Joseph’s directions and you are good to go. So go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele takes on the modern love poem. She’s the only one I know who not only tells us how to avoid the overly sentimental and cliché, but gives us many possibilities of directions to take. Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions, tips, and examples, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara asks for poems of pattern, and upsetting expectation. The spark is Frost’s ‘Fire and Ice’. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a  black and white photograph that bears studying. Unless you have an immediate idea, go over the photograph and jot down all the details that you notice and go from there. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, creates his prompt around one of my favourite poem subjects [I’m not kidding]: dandelions. Head over to see what he says.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday her Valentine subject is a turkey. What? Well, visit and see what she says. Gorgeous photos. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Too much fun! Even if I don’t get a poem I am trying this one! The Found Poetry Review asks us to write a surrealist poem based on what you hear on the radio. There are specific steps. Stop by and read about it. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have your neighbourhood, creative business, and ekphrasis. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Margaret gives us a prompt based on the work of artist Toril Fisher. Margaret says: For this challenge, please use these images for inspiration to promote Toril’s desire to begin a conversation about the beauty and interconnectedness all living creatures share with our amazing Mother Earth.  Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems-bannerAt We Write Poems Neil starts with: This week I have been thinking about brothers, sisters, things unknown and unsaid, black and white photographs become sepia old. For his elucidation, go on over.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at heart. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Tony Maude introduces us to Bouts-rimés. The form entails working with a provided set of end words. I can tell you it is wildly fun. I stopped what I was doing to give it a try. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flashy Fiction Friday in the person of Rob Halpin gives us a photograph and a direction with The Olympics. Visit the newly furbished site and have a look around.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for the next in a series of prompts; Thursday for a look at CSHS; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 14/02/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: They Followed Me Home, Ma

7:53 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Spirit in the Sky, sung by Norman Greenbaum

Hello, everyone. All present and accounted for? Then, let’s find us some prompts.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us Kristin LaTour. I’ve known her name as long as I have known Donna’s, which is as long as my blogging career. While they know each other, I came to them separately as writers. The prompt Donna offers is one of my favourites: take the end words from LaTour’s poem and create a new poem. Head over.

In resonance five, Joseph says we need to go to a space where you interact with others and to put your ears on, collect phrases to mine and grab hold of the little root-hairs of association that even common phrases tossed around near you can have, and follow them, up the roots, into their trunks and branches. The procedure he outlines is fascinating, so go on over and read the exercise.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele discusses personification and gives us several prompt possibilities Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions, tips, and examples, of which she always has many.

Never heard of a soundsuit? I MUST have one of the horses — watch the last video for a couple of minutes, or the whole thing! The horses are mesmerising. At Qweekly, Barbara has given us  a number of videos and instructed us to put on our own soundsuit. Visit.

We Write Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a  black and white photograph that I find fascinating, to the point that I sat and looked for quite a while before coming back here. There’s something about it. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Gabriella, at Poetry Jam, wants us to write a tribute poem. She gives Maya Angelou’s tribute poem to Mandela as the focus for her set up. Head over to see what she says.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday while her theme is a singing day, I love that she arrived at this joyful thought through her dyslexic reading of something else. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

We all like the thought of cutting up words and mixing them, don’t we? There is something about scissors and a page. The Found Poetry Review’s prompt asks for a cut up poem in honour of William Burroughs who championed this form. Stop by and read about it. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have interviews, super bowls, and laughter. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Marian gives us a prompt based on the work of Laurie Anderson. Don’t remember her? Head over and have a listen and read a bit about her work. Go play with the toads.

I do love Neil’s prompts. They open so many pathways. At We Write Poems we are instructed to watch a video to put ourselves in the needed frame of mind to read the rest of the prompt. Intrigued? Well, what are you waiting for? Go.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at love. Susan adds an interesting twist by asking us to pick One Age to speak from. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Gay Reiser Cannon discusses songwriting and its relationship to poetry. Her articles are always interesting. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flashy Fiction Friday gives a prompt that is short and sweet. Walt presents a topic on which to write, a main character, a key object and a setting. Visit the newly furbished site and have a look around.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for the first in a series of prompts; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 07/02/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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