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Friday Freeforall: And So We Begin… Again

7:41 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Both Sides Now with Judy Collins

HELLO! Yes, I am excited to be back with you. New followers, welcome. I hope everyone had a relaxing and relatively peaceful holiday. Everyone ready? I’ll chat more next Tuesday, or Thursday. For now, let’s go. As always, Donna opens:

Well. I stopped to read the poem Donna features at The Poetry Mixtape: ‘The River Confesses,’ by Carol Berg, and was so taken with it and the premise of her chapbook, Ophelia Unraveling, that I stopped to order a copy. Head over to read the poem and to see what Donna suggests we try.

I can see this will be one of those days when I take four hours to write this. I arrived at Joseph’s blog, naming constellations, to be reminded that he starts his new format tomorrow. I had to race over to my poems folder and ship off the poem I hope he critiques, at some point. For the final Reverie of the year and Joseph’s putting forth his idea for the coming year, head over. What he says about one’s writing improving with the taking apart of others’ poetry is true. I envy him the year, but we will learn so much by following along.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele tells us, you’ll need to think about your past, present, and future Christmases, Chanukahs, Kwanzaas, or other annual winter-season celebrations. Head over. Remember that Adele is always a good source for poems to read, even if a prompt doesn’t jumpstart your mind.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda brought us words, despite the flu. I am considering a sit-in with myself to get a poem done for Sunday [although it’s last week’s words I want!]. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

At Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has chosen a great line, both for the end of one year and the beginning of another, from George Bernard Shaw. Go on over to view the line and a link to the poem from which it comes.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. Although I don’t write limericks [the time, Madeleine, the time], I love their cleverness and the word play involved in successful ones. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit Magpie Tales for our first image prompt, a photograph, by R.A.D. Stainforth. I can tell people are still on holiday; only 63 people have written, a low for The Mag. Or, people might not know how to respond to this particular image.Remember a couple of things: you can be metaphorical; and you may write about only part of the picture, for example, the ashes. Head over.

At Poetry Jam, Mary gives us candles and several directions in which we might go. Visit to see what she suggests.

Elizabeth, 1sojournal, like Joseph, is shifting in direction, so, while not a prompt, is still an important place to go and read. She says of her new posts, I found the very beginnings of my own story as a serious writer. Discovered me, making notes about finding my own path for the next twenty years. The things that worked, and the ones that didn’t… I intend to continue reading, but also intend to share more of these bits and pieces. Many of them contain the first thoughts and ideas that became the articles on this blog. I believe they contain that first eye opening energy of the beginner, that one who has finally grasped a much wider concept than she has allowed herself in the past. It’s an energy I wish to share.

At Carol’s blog, Light Words, the photograph and accompanying words provide material for a prompt, although this is not Carol’s regular prompt. We do get a bonus. Should you be interested in meditation, either to do, or as a prompt in itself, read the rest of the post. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Mary’s Mixed Bag presents us with windows, a topic I never tire of. Head over to read what she says and to look around. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems presents us a bit of fun with their first prompt of the year [which is not to say the poem written cannot be serious]. Check out their tangent from a wordle. Also, if you missed it, read the previous post where we were asked to talk about books that had an impact on [y]our sense of writing.

At dVerse, we are trying a form, the lune, both types. An American take on a haiku, one is syllabic and the other counts words. They are small and fun, so take several bites. Visit. Wander around. Stay awhile; it’s such a friendly place. Champagne all round.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author: Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us a choice of  any topic discussed on her blog in the past week, as well as the comments, for a possible source. Her topics are always focused on an aspect of nature. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a new tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. The sites won’t always be up-to-date, but the links will get you there.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt [I know, vague]; Thursday for a topic, hitherto unpicked [so if anyone has something they want me to discuss, discover, explain, let me know at: margoroby@gmail.com]; and next Friday for the usual.

I’m so glad to be back with you. Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 04/01/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Are We There Yet?

7:31 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Steel Rail Blues by Gordon Lightfoot — I had forgotten how much I love this singer

Hello, everyone. Are we all hanging in? Grimly? It will get worse, you say? I know, but I do love this season. I think I have everything ordered; I don’t know what I would do without Amazon. If you need a retreat, check these out:

At The Poetry Mixtape Donna introduces us to Erin Elizabeth Smith and her  poem ‘Four Photographs of House with Mother’.  I love the structure and idea of the poem. Visit and read what Donna says. As with all Saturday prompts, the new prompt will be up tomorrow, or you can wait for next Friday! Whichever, visit.

In Reverie Forty-eight: euphony, eyephony, we all phony,  Joseph discusses sound structure. Sound is vital to all styles of poetry, maybe even more so for writers of so-called free verse. Head over to read Joseph’s essay. Then go play with sound. I’m always tickled pink when I achieve a thread of internal rhyme. It’s a device I appreciate more than any other.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele discusses waiting, a concept that originally meant to watch out for [makes sense]. Head over. Remember that Adele is always a good source for poems to read, even if a prompt doesn’t jumpstart your mind.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda and her husband brainstormed the list and came up with a great bunch of words. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

At Carry On Tuesday,  Keith is traveling, so has left two lines for us to work with, one a Beatles’ song, the other by Lennon. Both are titles and work well separately and together. Head over to see the line and for a link to hear the songs.

Time to get your limerick on and increase your vocabulary! Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our first image prompt, a photograph, by Man Ray. As soon as I saw the image, I thought of Adele Kenney’s prompt based on waiting. The two might work together in interesting ways. Head over.

At Poetry Jam, Peggy Goetz gives us a little background on the historical Sinterklaas, as  context, before giving us a prompt based on people we might honour with a poem. Visit to see what she says.

For November, Elizabeth says: the Musical Note Prompts will probably return after the new year. At this point in time, I would like to offer image inspiration for the November PAD (poem a day) Challenge, beginning November 1st. Each of the images is the result of my creative play with digital art and will be offered separately (one a day) through the month. Each image will include a title which may be used, or not, as part of the prompt.

At Carol’s blog, Light Words, the photograph and accompanying poem focus on mushrooms as an entry to a couple of important themes. She tells us she can’t quite get to where she knows she’s heading, but invites us to try. Go on over.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I’m giving you the general link, as there are a couple of things to delight us. We have prompts, interviews, photographs and other interesting challenges. Wander through the gardens. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems has a topic I have been working on for, well, years! Have you ever thought of your life as a poem? Head over to read what Neil has to say about it.

At dVerse, we are trying a form, people! Gay Reiser Cannon introduces us to quaterns. Those who can handle rhyme and metre rejoice. Those who can’t, guess what? You can still write this form because it’s all about the refrain and its placement and that part is fun. Visit. Wander around. Stay awhile; it’s such a friendly place. Is it eggnog, yet?

Patricia K. Lichen, Author: Monday’s Nature Quote is one I found so compelling, I broke from the traditional Friday link. I thought you would like to read it and possibly to use it as the basis of a poem for yourself, or even, still, for the Friday prompt posting. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a new tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. The sites won’t always be up-to-date, but the links will get you there.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt to do with your road less traveled; and next Friday for the usual.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
11 Comments

Posted by on 07/12/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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TGIF: Friday Freeforall

7:35 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Come O’er the Stream Charlie by The Corries

Hello, all. NaNoWriMo-ers, congratulations. Update on ViV who regularly gives us heart attacks. We have learned the signal: when she disappears from the waves, things are not good. Visit her site for the latest from ViV’s daughter, Sally. In short, despite a real scare, she is recovering fast and will be up for dancing on tables, soon. Meanwhile:

At The Poetry Mixtape Donna introduces us to Marilyn Nelson and her gorgeous poem ‘Dusting’.  If nothing else, go read the poem to see how unlikely words, seemingly unpoetic words, can make a great poem. Head on over . As with all Saturday prompts, the new prompt will be up tomorrow, or you can wait for next Friday! Whichever, visit.

In Reverie Forty-seven: freeing the verse,  Joseph suggests that we don’t let grammar stand in the way of [y]our poem. I know. Pretty radical. You may recall I suggest the same thing often. Now you have another voice. Head over to read what he says about the mechanics of poetry, with an eye towards free verse.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele discusses romance, a state not necessarily involving love. Head over. Remember that Adele is always a good source for poems to read, even if a prompt doesn’t jumpstart your mind.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda chose the words from a Robert Frost poem and gives us the link to read it. It’s always fun to see how a writer’s words are used when we don’t know the context from which they came. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

At Carry On Tuesday,  Keith is traveling, so has left two lines for us to work with, one a Beatles’ song, the other by Lennon. Both are titles and work well separately and together. Head over to see the line and for a link to hear the songs.

Time to get your limerick on! Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our first image prompt, a compelling photograph. I sat and stared for several minutes before recalling you all. You’ll see why when you visit. If you check the link for the photograph’s source, plan to have quite a bit of free time. I really almost did not come back. It’s quite a party over at The Mag. I was told I would be number 85, should I have a poem. Wow!

At Poetry Jam, Dani is taking us to the land of nostalgia. It’s make believe time. Visit to read the prompt.

For November, Elizabeth says: the Musical Note Prompts will probably return after the new year. At this point in time, I would like to offer image inspiration for the November PAD (poem a day) Challenge, beginning November 1st. Each of the images is the result of my creative play with digital art and will be offered separately (one a day) through the month. Each image will include a title which may be used, or not, as part of the prompt.

Back to Wednesdays at Carolisle’s blog, Light Words. Gorgeous photograph and wonderful statement from Rilke. Go on over.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Mary’s Mixed Bag is upon us. Her focus is with connections. Head over to read what she has to say. There are other interesting challenges. Wander through the gardens. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems is giving us a fun topic: transitions in time and season. They have a very cool excerpt of poetic prose from the Brothers Grimm, as an example. Head over.

We are Meeting the Bar at dVerse with Anna. She would like us to play with erasure poetry, so go read what she says. It’s an interesting form and the good poems I have read awe me that someone saw the poem amongst all the words. Visit. Wander around. Stay awhile; it’s such a friendly place. Hot rum toddies, anyone?

Patricia K. Lichen, Author, in her Weekend Haiku & Limericks  has at least one article and one photograph to use as prompts for a haiku, or a limerick [and if it sparks something else, wonderful. Just because you can’t post other, doesn’t mean you should ignore inspiration. Am I right?]. The images of flowers, alone, are worth the visit. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest. A comforting feel to it.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a new tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. The sites won’t always be up-to-date, but the links will get you there.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; and next Friday for the usual.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 30/11/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Because It’s Friday: Friday Freeforall

7:27 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Fire and Rain by James Taylor

Hello, all. NaNoWriMo-ers, are you hanging in there? You are past the halfway mark. November seems to be racing past. Christmas in five weeks. I’m usually cosily confident in my readiness. Not this year. This year, I can’t seem to find the get up and go. Yet, still, it approacheth. Meanwhile, prompts to divert ourselves with:

At The Poetry Mixtape Donna introduces us to Andrea Witzke Slot and her poem ‘Terra Incognita’. Donna makes an interesting point about poem endings and a revision suggestion that is nice and easy to do and might shift a not quite working poem into a new animal. Head over to read more. As with all Saturday prompts, the new prompt will be up tomorrow, or you can wait for next Friday! Whichever, visit.

In Reverie Forty-five: finder, keeper,  Joseph wants us to play with found poetry: where whole lines of other beautiful poems are specifically stitched together. We’re going to appropriate a few different ideas for the construction of our found poem, which will only be kind of a found poem. Joseph has many suggestions for possibilities, so head over and read. Found poetry is limitless fun. I know, as I just submitted two found poems. Let’s see what you do. Visit.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele talks about one of the things she discovered during Sandy: the significance of being connected, or not. Her prompt for us revolves around connections and she has many suggestions for possibilities, as well as a link to an interesting article [possible found poem, anyone?]. Head over. Remember that Adele is always a good source for poems to read, even if a prompt doesn’t jumpstart your mind.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda chose the words from a poem and gives us the link to read it. I thought it particularly fun, as the poem is short, to see what others did with the words. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

At Carry On Tuesday,  Keith gives us a line by Mahatma Gandhi. Head over to see the line and for a link to more statements by Gandhi..

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our first image prompt, a painting, Verdun, 1917 by Felix Vallotton. Before I even glanced at the title, I thought, Looks like WWI. However, you are allowed to ignore titles and write about aspects that you see, which may have nothing to do with the subject. Don’t forget that you can write about parts of images.

At Poetry Jam, Mary M. is taking us to the circus. Even if you have never been to one, there are few people who have not had a circus in their lives, in some form, even if it’s hearing about circuses through their lives. Visit to read the prompt.

For November, Elizabeth says: the Musical Note Prompts will probably return after the new year. At this point in time, I would like to offer image inspiration for the November PAD (poem a day) Challenge, beginning November 1st. Each of the images is the result of my creative play with digital art and will be offered separately (one a day) through the month. Each image will include a title which may be used, or not, as part of the prompt. We have only missed one day so visit to see what it’s about.

Yes, I have shifted us to another part in the life of Carolisle’s blog, Light Words. I was caught by the Simic poem, but even more, by the photograph and Carolisle’s suggestion that we try inhabiting stones. Neat. Go on over.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry’s Wednesday Challenge is quite a challenge and compelling.Wander over to read what she says about the fourth wall. Along with her interesting prompt, she provides links to a  couple of things to help us with our discoveries.There are other interesting challenges. Wander through the gardens. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems offers another challenge: perfect sentences! Limited amounts of perfect sentences. Wrestling with the definition of a perfect sentence should provide entertainment for everyone. Head over to read the exercise.

We are Meeting the Bar at dVerse with Victoria. She would like us to play in the fields of literary allusions, so go read what she says. Visit. Wander around. Stay awhile; it’s such a friendly place. I saw them bringing out the marshmallows for hot chocolate.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author, in her Weekend Haiku & Limericks  has at least one article [read this week’s!]and one photograph to use as prompts for a haiku, or a limerick [and if it sparks something else, wonderful. Just because you can’t post other, doesn’t mean you should ignore inspiration. Am I right?]. The images of flowers, alone, are worth the visit. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest. A comforting feel to it.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a new tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. The sites won’t always be up-to-date, but the links will get you there.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for another narrative based exercise. I have enjoyed reading the prose pieces this week. Whether you have tackled the exercise, or not, visit and read the pieces. Yes, you will find a couple of poems. It’s always about what wants to be written. Friday will be dark. I’ll be in D.C. celebrating with my daughter, my sister-in-law, and my niece.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 16/11/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Because Words Are For All: Friday Freeforall

7:46 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Me and You and a Dog Named Blue by  by Lobo

Hello, everyone. I hope you are well. The poor eastern shore continues to get weather that hampers recovery. Looks like we’re going to have winter this year, except Southern California where they are going nuts with an Indian Summer. While everyone practices hunkering down, here are some prompts to keep you company:

At The Poetry Mixtape Donna is up and running and sounding herself [thank goodness — we worried!]. She bases her post on Laura E. Davis’s chapbook Braiding the Storm. Head over to read more. As with all Saturday prompts, the new prompt will be up tomorrow, or you can wait for next Friday! Whichever, visit.

Break to chat with son in Vermont. They have moved into their house and are sleeping on the floor, until they get their bed. Wonder if daughter, who is, even now, driving from D.C. to Vermont, knows a floor awaits her after an eleven hour drive.

In Reverie Forty-four: the sea, the sea,  Joseph asks us to write a poem sparked by the phrase ‘the sea, the sea‘. He suggests we consider folding in prompts from two other sites to write a “postmodern” poem (as I posted last night), while the second was to work a storm into a poem about a failed relationship [links at Joseph’s]. Joseph has many other suggestions for possibilities, so head over and read. Almost everyone can connect to the phrase. Let’s see what you do.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele was affected by Sandy, and was without electricity for several days. She is back up and says if you visit tomorrow, next week’s prompt will be up. I am giving you the general URL. Visit!

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda and her family played word association to arrive at the list. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. I have been wordle-less for a few weeks, now, and miss the Sunday morning rounds.

At Carry On Tuesday,  Keith gives us the title and first line from a song by Colin Blunstone with the Alan Parsons Project. Head over to see the lines and for a link to the song.

Break to toss towels in dryer, and plug phone into charger, as I noticed the battery is almost out.

Madeleine came through Sandy, humour intact. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our first image prompt, a black and white photograph, a portrait from 1937. I found myself drawn to the rocks behind the woman, so I know my draft will focus on the place rather than the person. Don’t forget that you can write about parts of images.

At Poetry Jam, Peggy asks us to consider the seasons. What she really would like is for us to imagine a world with only one season, but she broadens the prompt a little. Visit to read the prompt.

For November, Elizabeth says: the Musical Note Prompts will probably return after the new year. At this point in time, I would like to offer image inspiration for the November PAD (poem a day) Challenge, beginning November 1st. Each of the images is the result of my creative play with digital art and will be offered separately (one a day) through the month. Each image will include a title which may be used, or not, as part of the prompt. We have only missed one day so visit to see what it’s about.

Thought about breaking for coffee and breakfast. We’re at ten o’clock, what with the other breaks and the length of this post. Decided to hold it out as a reward.

We’re back to a Wednesday in the life of Carolisle’s blog. The photograph and the prompt revolve around patterns. Check the next two day’s photographs as well. Head on over.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I knew it was Hannah, before I saw her name. [Yes, that is how distinctive your voice is :-)] For this week’s transformation, she gives us a call to stretch your poet-voices to express the point of view of wildlife that inhabits the Temperate Forest.  Head over to read what she says and to see the photographs she offers us. There are other interesting challenges. Wander through the gardens. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems offers a challenge, one I love to set every February: write about love without using the word, or a synonym.  Head over to see what it’s about and to try your hand.

Every now and then I give you the general address for dVerse, on the theory that if you haven’t been wandering around, now you’ll have to. Right? I thought so. This week, we have an introduction to the art of Sue Ann, whose art pieces have a strong, clear mood; the than bauk form; and a call to let our voices be heard [Go, Brian!]. Visit. Wander around. Stay awhile; it’s such a friendly place. If you are new at the bar, scroll down to the end for the choices.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author, in her Weekend Haiku & Limericks  has at least one article, and one photograph to use as prompts for a haiku, or a limerick [and if it sparks something else, wonderful. Just because you can’t post other, doesn’t mean you should ignore inspiration. Am I right?]. The images of flowers, alone, are worth the visit. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest. A comforting feel to it. This week, red tailed hawks!

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a new tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. The sites won’t always be up-to-date, but the links will get you there.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for another narrative based exercise; and next Friday for the roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

Breakfast now? Coffee? Yes?

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 09/11/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Because Words Are Free: Friday Freeforall

8:28 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Magnificent Outpouring by Gordon Lightfoot

It has been only a week since I said, here, that we were getting ready to hunker down, as Sandy’s reach was extensive. We escaped, as Atlanta often does [it’s being on the hill that does it — hey, we’re up a thousand feet or so — no, don’t go check. We’re up.]. I have watched the weather channel for four days because of the hypnotic quality of a disaster one can watch as it happens; because I have been fascinated and impressed with everyone, no matter their role; and, because I know people affected. I suspect we all do. Joseph let us know he is safe; I’m waiting to see Madeleine’s blog change, since she posted her prompt Sunday.

As writers we take our material from everything, no matter the subject. Whether you watched, or were part of, Sandy, you have a wealth of material, so here are some prompts from the week:

Donna has been very quiet. I’ll leave last week’s prompt up and if you didn’t have time, go visit now. At The Poetry Mixtape Donna tells us she attended a reading by Seamus Heaney. The poem she gives us is one Heaney likens to a Dutch interior: a poem that wants to be a Vermeer. Head over to read more. As with all Saturday prompts, the new prompt will be up tomorrow, or you can wait for next Friday! Whichever, visit.

In Reverie Forty-three: don’t give up the search  Joseph takes us through one of his world forms, this time the qasida, an Arabic form of ancient lineage. Yes, it is one of those eyeball exploding exercises, but oh so good for the poetry muscle. Visit. Read. Take yourself through it. You will be surprised how much you learn, even if a poem does not arise.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has set up so much fun for us that you, like I, may have to bookmark her prompt. She sets up the prompt ideas with an interesting essay on the origin of costumes for Halloween. The ideas themselves made me want to try every one. Sigh. Go on over and read.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us she took the words from three ‘posters’ she has on her Facebook wall. Visit to see the wordle [and the posters] and to read what others have done.

At Carry On Tuesday,  Keith gives us a quote that is part of a Halloween focused line. The quote itself allows for a non-Halloween poem. Head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our first image prompt, a black and white photograph, oddly, with no attribution. The challenge here will be to write a non-cliche, non-overly sentimental poem.

At Poetry Jam, Mary asks us to consider the many choices we have had, have, and will have, in our lives. She lists many possibilities to give us a start and includes several illustrations. Visit to read the prompt.

For November, Elizabeth says: the Musical Note Prompts will probably return after the new year. At this point in time, I would like to offer image inspiration for the November PAD (poem a day) Challenge, beginning November 1st. Each of the images is the result of my creative play with digital art and will be offered separately (one a day) through the month. Each image will include a title which may be used, or not, as part of the prompt. We have only missed one day so visit to see what it’s about.

This week I continue with a Monday in the life of Carolisle’s blog. I loved the photograph. It’s clouds, people! I even follow a cloud group on Facebook. The question Carolisle asks is interesting.  Head over and check it out.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Fireblossom is playing with us. Can you resist checking a prompt containing the words, convent, lies, and bullshit? I didn’t think so. There are other interesting challenges. Wander through the gardens. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems talks about one of the ways in which we learn, osmosis. The exercise presented involves this process. Head over to see what it’s about and to try your hand.

Every now and then I give you the general address for dVerse, on the theory that if you haven’t been wandering around, now you’ll have to. Right? I thought so. This week, we have an essay on the post-modern, the villanelle form [if you are quick], the poem as self-portrait, and a question from Brian as to how we might want Pretzels & Bullfights to evolve. Visit. Wander around. Stay awhile; it’s such a friendly place. If you are new at the bar, scroll down to the end of the essay for the choices.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author, in her Weekend Haiku & Limericks  has at least one article, and one photograph to use as prompts for a haiku, or a limerick [and if it sparks something else, wonderful. Just because you can’t post other, doesn’t mean you should ignore inspiration. Am I right?]. The images of flowers, alone, are worth the visit. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest. A comforting feel to it.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a new tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. The sites won’t always be up-to-date, but the links will get you there.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a narrative based exercise; and next Friday for another roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
6 Comments

Posted by on 02/11/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: How Many Can You Visit?

8:33 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Gumboots by Paul Simon

Hello, all. I have the Weather Channel on in the background and feel as if I should duck and cover. It’s nervous making when they use words like unprecedented, never in the last two centuries, Frankenstorm. I messaged both my kids to make sure they have emergency supplies. One lives in Washington DC and the other in Vermont. I know! Of course, I don’t have supplies and what am I doing tomorrow? Skip and I are driving towards the coast [!!!] to attend a BBQ festival in North Carolina. Here is our emergency supply of prompts to lay in.

At The Poetry Mixtape Donna tells us she attended a reading by Seamus Heaney. I am so jealous. The poem she gives us is one Heaney likens to a Dutch interior: a poem that wants to be a Vermeer. Head over to read more. As with all Saturday prompts, the new prompt will be up tomorrow, or you can wait for next Friday! Whichever, visit.

Again with the jealousy. In Reverie Forty-two: the shoulders of giants,  Joseph tells us he spent the whole day at the Academy of American Poets’ Chancellors Talks. He listened to poets such as Gary Snyder(!), Mark Doty(!), Jane Hirshfield(!), Naomi Shihab Nye(!), and others including Sharon Olds and Carl Phillips. I may have to move to New York. The good news is that Joseph, as he always does, is sharing what he has learned. Head over to read. If you don’t have time, bookmark this one [after you have read it. You have time for that.], or do one of the options and save the others. Yes, there are several offerings.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele describes her reading at the recent Dodge Festival. The prompt focuses on something magical, so visit to see what she means by that. Adele has some good tips towards the end of the post with regards to writing about magical moments.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda says, This week’s words come to us from Barbara Yates Young. She culled them from a listserv bulletin board. These were a fun grouping of words. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

At Carry On Tuesday,  Keith gives us an entire quote from the controversial Indian Guru Sai Baba. He also provides the link to see a short video about the man. Head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our first image prompt, a close up of part of the American dollar bill. The part which includes the pyramid and the eye. Intriguing as a prompt. I can hear the excitement from all you masons and neo-templars out there.

At Poetry Jam, Dani wants us to write about a great love, or passion. She lists many possibilities to give us a start and includes a bunch of illustrations. Visit to read the prompt.

Have a problem conveying a truth pithily? Visit Elizabeth’s site, Musical Notes. The new song will go up every Tuesday. This prompt is fun to play and tinker with, not only because the inspiration is a song, but because the response must be done in 15 words. Sounds fun, doesn’t it? It is. Show up next Tuesday!

This week I am giving you a Monday in the life of Carolisle’s blog. I loved the photograph. The quote is lovely, offering an interesting philosophy, and dovetails nicely with Adele’s magic moments. Head over and check it out.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Mary’s Mixed Bag promises fun, even a chance to let off steam, as we consider our pet peeves. There are other interesting challenges. Wander through the gardens. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems asks us, Why do you write?. They would like our answers in the form of a list poem and give an example to start us off. Go on over and read the prompt, as well as the example.

At dVerse, visit with Samuel Peralta and his discussion of the art of the villanelle in Form for All. Wander around. Visit. Stay awhile; it’s such a friendly place.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author, in her Weekend Haiku & Limericks  has at least one article, and one photograph to use as prompts for a haiku, or a limerick [and if it sparks something else, wonderful. Just because you can’t post other, doesn’t mean you should ignore inspiration. Am I right?]. The images of flowers, alone, are worth the visit. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest. A comforting feel to it.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a new tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. The sites won’t always be up-to-date, but the links will get you there.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt; and next Friday for another roundup. Are all you NaNoWriMo writers ready?

Happy writing, everyone.

 
5 Comments

Posted by on 26/10/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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