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Pushing Prompts and Poetry: The Friday Freeforall

7:24 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. We are now officially in the month of madness, whether we celebrate, or not. Keep your heads down, keep an eye on January. We’ll get there. If you, like me, enjoy this month, then revel, and don’t let the madnesses get to you.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck just because I am not ready to not start with the tow truck. However, remember that Donna gave us two prompts last time so she could enjoy her son’s visit. I have left the link, as I suspect many only had time for one prompt, if that. Now you get another chance.

Over at dVerse,we are asked to Wander in the wild, lasso a poem, reel it back. Even if you do not have time to follow the prompt, visit, read the post, watch the video, follow the link. We are offered intriguing thoughts by Mark. And you can always come back on your own time.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Elena and Walt ask us to consider the aspects of our lives for which we remain thankful beyond one week a year. Head over to read the prompt and the hosts’ offerings.

AtThe Sunday Whirl Brenda says: This week’s words were inspired by a visit to Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge. After visiting, I came home and brainstormed a dozen words. I let the sounds of the words direct me as much as my experience at the refuge.Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening lines of the pop ballad All By Myself. Did you know the melody is from Rachmaninov’s second piano concerto in 1901? To read the lines and hear Celine Dion sing her version of the song, head on over. Keith reminds us we can use part of the lines if we wish, and in this case, each of the four lines can spark a poem on its own.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt gives us investigate. As a sign of how busy we all are, the number of people who have posted is tiny compared to the usual legions. Visit and investigate [sorry, could not resist], the offerings. One Single Impression gives us a phrase, from Leo of I Rhyme Without Reason, which has many possibilities, both for approaches and playing with tone of voice. Head over to read an example [or several, if you check out what contributors have written].

My guaranteed weekly smile. I hope Madeleine never becomes tired of writing these. Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is November, Winter, Change, and  Hope.  And looking towards next week, they will be asking us to focus on my life in free verse. Yep! Taking a look at ourselves.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. You can write about what you see in the photograph, or something it suggests, like out of placeness, or standing outness, or individuality, or juxtaposition. I want the job of finding the images for Magpie Tales! Next best: seeing them each week.

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday is already at T. I feel like we were here moments ago, and can’t believe we are already back. The alliteration is presented in the form of a poem, done so well, I became oblivious to the fact of alliteration. Go on over and enjoy.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are behave, jettison, and mob. Hard not to think of the Occupy groups, and beyond them the groups in the different countries of the Middle East, as they reach for a different form of government. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems asks us to write about an ending. But WWP has put an interesting twist on the way we look at the ending. Head over to read the rest.

Over at Poets United we have image week and one of Ella’s photos to work with. Go over and read the accompanying text and to visit with the image.

I have been happily presenting this blog since finding it, without giving the blog’s title: Patricia K. Lichen, Author. This week her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has a twist on their twist. What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She posts new topics every week around Friday. This week gives us a chance to talk about reading whether it’s what we receive from reading, or what we read, or how reading affects our writing. This is another topic on which we probably all have something to say. If you have been hesitant to add your voice, go over and note that your voice can be as short or as long as you wish. We don’t get many chances to talk to each other about our craft. Here’s a chance. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know?

I shall see you Tuesday for a painless prompt [does this mean painful prompts requiring much agony, and hair pulling, lie ahead? Oh, yes. I have been reining in my dark side. I shall unleash all in January. Shall I start with a form?]; and Friday for the roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 02/12/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompt[s] in Case You Aren’t Doing PAD or NaNoWriMo — Friday Freeforall

7:55 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. I know. It’s before eight in the morning where I am. Good grief!

My mind was set going by a lovely email, written in the form of a poem, from one of the editors of the Origami Poems Project. They are getting ready to publish a second collection of mine, and I am feeling chuffed [to my American friends, that’s a good thing]. If you don’t know them, visit. It’s a wonderful project.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck where we are asked to try our hand at an abcedarian poem. This is fun play. And, even better, Donna gives options, so head over to the tow truck to read the options and for a link that will explain abcedarian poems.

Over at dVerse, I am ignoring the form post [which you can wander around and find for yourselves, if your brains are not wrapped up in PAD or NaNoWriMo], and going for a suggestion from them that we play with idioms. They offer a couple of options and a link to a whole lot of idioms, if you are just curious. Let me add an option and that is to let the idiom kick off the initial draft of your poem and then remove it.

Poetic Bloomings asks us to take on one of the most written about, and therefore hard to do well, emotions, and that is love. You might combine your idea with one of the forms they suggest this week, the nonet, or the etheree. Both forms work well with this emotion, as one closes down and the other unfolds.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are brought by Barbara, who pulled them from Henry Reed’s poem, ‘The Naming of Parts’ [you will find a link on Brenda’s site. Even if you don’t wordle, this is a poem worth reading.]. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the first line of a poem by John Clare, written in 1821, called ‘Autumn’. To read the line and to read the poem, head on over. The line is one of those wonderful ones that can be metaphorical, or literal.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt focuses on a phrase that can be part of a poem, or used to spark an idea. And One Single Impression gives us hourglass, which comes with the challenge of not sounding clichéd. Head over to read an example [or several, if you check out what contributors have written].

My guaranteed weekly smile. Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is Childhood, Dreams, Books, and Role Models.  And looking towards next week, when the U.S. thanksgiving seems to have morphed into a general week to remember to be thankful, they will focus on This is what I’m thankful for in life! Again, the challenge is to not sound clichéd.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. Whoever chooses the paintings for Magpie Tales, always hits the nail for me. I am going to have to find how they find their prints. A Googling I shall go.

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday is chock full of good stuff this week. Not only is there a magnificent piece of alliteRation, but links to a couple of pieces of music I haven’t listened to in a while. Go on over and enjoy.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are impetus, solace, and vindication. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems asks us to write an epistolary poem, a poem-letter to be specific. Here is your chance to use the second person correctly, in a poem. Head over to read the rest.

Over at Poets United we are given This week start a poem with I. I love the photographs that accompany the prompt. I know, I always love them, but seriously, they are cool, or fun, or beautiful, something that evokes a response from me, every week, so even if you have no time to write, go see the photos.

Weekend Haiku & Limericks includes truffula trees in their possible topics. How can you not go check it out? What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week gives us a chance to talk about the topics we avoid, or find difficult when writing about them. I think most of us have subjects we have never, or won’t, or don’t want to touch. Here is a chance to talk with others about it. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit, and I, would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for another prompt that will be easy on your brains, I hope; and Friday for the roundup. Friday will be this post again, as I will be celebrating Thanksgiving with our daughter and my brother and his wife. Nope, not taking the computer.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 18/11/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompt[s] in Case You Aren’t Doing PAD or NaNoWriMo — Friday Freeforall

8:02 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. I know. You are saying to yourselves: Is anyone not doing Robert Lee Brewer’s Poem a Day? Or, NaNoWriMo? And if everyone is writing every day, how can they even look at another prompt? Here is my suggestion. Check out the prompts and make brief notes of each, so that as Robert’s prompts come around you can see if any of the prompts work together. Remember that Robert’s ideas do not have to be done on the day they are given. If an idea doesn’t work one day write something else, even if it’s off-topic. Make a note that it is off-topic, so that when you put together a chapbook to submit you can ignore the ones you wrote to write. As for you novelists…keep writing.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck [I have been assured that while I can’t start with the tow truck there will be a different incarnation] and a prompt that challenges us to take something familiar [names of drinks] and use it out of context. Head over to the Tow Truck to read what Donna wants us to try. You will be surprised at the poems this kind of exercise produces.

Over at dVerse, the prompt says in part: For today’s prompt, let’s grab our paints and mix up a poetic palette using color. The post offers us both thorough definitions of aspects of colour and several options for writing. Visit to read the rest of the exercise.

Poetic Bloomings prompt made me laugh. Talk about synchronicity. Go see why.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are from a random generator. I can’t believe it is already the 29th week Bren has brought us this wonderful way to spark poems.Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the first line of one of Nicole Edward’s poems. To read the line and to read more of her poetry, head on over.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt focuses on the word omen. And One Single Impression gives us birdie, which has diverse definitions to play with.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is Feathers,  Fidelity, Figment, and  Fables.  And looking towards next week, they will focus on Childhood, Dreams, Books, and Role Models. I sense prose poems.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. Having spent the last few weeks increasingly buried in family genealogy, I was intrigued by this week’s photograph, especially as the name on the tombstone is one of my lines. Wonder who and where it is?

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday wants us to Cue Q to centre stage.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are drank, hitch, and muster. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems starts, It’s late, it’s dark, the forest is deep and we’ve lost our way! How do we find our poem way home? Makes me think of a fairy tale. This week’s prompt is care of Pamela Sayers. Head over to read the rest.

Over at Poets United we are given What does winter make you think about?. I love the photographs that accompany the prompt, so even if you have no time to write [surely one of Robert’s prompts works with winter], go see the photos.

Weekend Haiku & Limericks includes commuter dogs in their possible topics. Check it out. What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week gives us a chance to talk about the synchronicity we have run into with regard to writing. Many of us have mentioned often the synchronicity that visits both our writing and our lives. Here is a chance to talk with others about it. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for another prompt that will be easy on your brains, I hope; and Friday for the roundup.

Happy writing, everyone. Remember: you can always revise.

 
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Posted by on 11/11/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompt[s] — Friday Freeforall

9:18 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. I have noticed that many of us are sounding lethargic, grumpy, a little dozy maybe, even apathetic in regards to our writing. May I suggest this is a normal cycle and not to worry too much. One possible strategy is to withdraw from your brain all the choices you give it every week. Choose one prompt and one prompt only and see what happens.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck [I can’t believe I will not be able to start with that soon] and a prompt that says, in part: Today we are going to use some lines from heavy hitters to inspire some writing. Head over to the tow truck to read what Donna wants us to try. She gives us three options to play with.

Over at dVerse, the prompt says in part: So today’s poetic challenge is to write a call & response poem, a poem with two or more people interacting – verbal or nonverbal. Visit to read the rest of the exercise.

Poetic Bloomings prompt asks us to try a form: the Shadorma. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt, and the poems by the hosts in response. And, yes, I do sometimes ignore a site’s actual prompt and choose something else they offer. It’s all about stretching…okay, and fun.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are from Mike Patrick at The Poet’s Quill. The challenge will be to use the words in unexpected ways. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle [and its gorgeous autumn colours] and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry on Tuesday gives us the last words Beatle George Harrison said to his wife. To read the phrase and to read more last words of famous people, head on over.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt focuses on the word operation. Visit to see what they suggest as possibilities. And One Single Impression gives us sunset, which I know you know can be literal or metaphoric.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is anything haunting, dark, orange color related, or autumn related.  And looking towards next week, they will focus on Feathers,  Fidelity, Figment, and  Fables. How about all four in one poem…

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. I find an irony in the photograph, given how I started this post. Note the crumpled paper, clearly belonging to a troubled writer. As with any picture, you can focus on the whole, or a small piece, or you can write on something the picture triggers in you.

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday wants us to Please do Participate.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are carnage, jerk, and puncture. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems starts, Tell us about when life just seems to be going a different way than you. Hmmm, another nudge at those of us who are experiencing difficulties with our writing? Or, did you have plans that have gone awry?

Over at Poets United it’s time for Ella’s photograph. Head over to read what she says.

Weekend Haiku & Limericks includes seals and surfers in their possible topics. I know, that’s last week’s. It appears Patricia hasn’t been able to post today’s new prompt. Perhaps when you wander over she will have. What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week gives us a chance to talk about the myths we have run into with regard to writing. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt that will be easy on your brains, I hope; and Friday for the roundup.

Happy writing, everyone. And, don’t worry about it too much, in any case.

 
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Posted by on 04/11/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Prompts — Friday Freeforall

7:22 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. Ready for a weekend of writing and frightening?

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that begins: “Good poets borrow; great poets steal.” Many of you know this already. Head over to the tow truck [where we are counting down the final ten] to read what Donna wants us to try.

Over at dVerse, the prompt at the bar says in part: At times we as poets can be too linear in our writing. Visit to read the rest of the exercise that hopes to lead us down a less linear path.

Poetic Bloomings prompt says, in partWe are all a little weird. Yes, we are. For a chance to share a little weird, visit the site to read the rest of the prompt, and the poems by the hosts in response.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are from Poetry 180 [the link is in the post]. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry on Tuesday gives us words by the 8th century High Tang poet Wang We. To read the phrase and to read more of Wang We’s work head on over.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt focuses on place. Visit to find where you are going. And One Single Impression asks us to do a little exercise.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is to write a poem to do with Nature, Forests, Rivers, or Mountains.  And looking towards next week, they will focus on… what else? Halloween – Trick or Treat?

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week they have a super cool photograph. As with any picture, you can focus on the whole, or a small piece, or you can write on reflections, or reflecting.

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday wants us to Opt for O.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are figment, inclined, and vulnerable. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word. And, how can you resist a chance to use figment?

We Write Poems simply gives us the phrase Trick or Treat. Maybe the challenge is to use it in an unexpected manner.

Poets United focuses on something we all deal with in some form, even if we don’t name it writer’s block. For the rest of the prompt and some photographs, visit.

Weekend Haiku & Limericks includes seals and surfers in their possible topics. What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week gives us a chance to talk about the rough patches we hit in writing. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt that depends on rules; and Friday for an uptodate roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 28/10/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Prompt Your Weekend Away Redux

9:09 — Atlanta

Hello everyone. I am speaking to you from Disney World via the magic of pre-calendaring the post. Remember, I again made use of ViV’s brilliant suggestion: Put last week’s post up and people can go to the homepage for the latest prompts. Don’t be confused when you think you have seen a prompt before. You have.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that begins: In the Beatles’ song “Let It Be,” Paul McCartney sings the title phrase 41 times. Clearly the prompt has to do with repetition…or does it? Head over to find out and, if nothing else, sit back and enjoy Paul singing the song.

Over at dVerse, you will find a discussion on imitation as a tool in writing. If I use another poet’s work as a starting point for mine, I employ a device known as copy-change, which uses the structure of the copied poem, a scaffolding of words and lines, but my words are the dominant words. It is not an exercise I am good at, but it works well for many people..

Poetic Bloomings prompt saysThis week, to do our part in this poetic economy, we are providing a “two-fer” – two prompts for the price of one. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt, and the poems by the hosts in response. Yes, that’s right, from his sickbed, in what I am sure is a contravention of doctor’s orders, Walt has his contribution.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are from a couple of contributors and Brenda’s family. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry on Tuesday gives the opening few words from Joseph Heller’s Catch 22. To see the words and read an extract from the novel, visit the site. I notice that Keith has a whole new look over there.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: The Call. Not call, but the call. That can go in a whole lot of directions.  And One Single Impression offers river, another word that offers infinite possibilities.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is to write a poem to do with Friends, relationships and everyone around.  And looking towards next week, they will focus on Longing, Loss, Losing and Failure.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week they have a painting that I covet. I would love to have it hanging on my wall. However, for poetic purposes, we have a couple of possibilities: a little sci-fi, a nursery tale, a metaphor…

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday is going mad for Marilyn Monroe and other Ms.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are admire, follow, and piece. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems gives us a term for finding a silver lining within the process of falling apart, their focus for this week’s prompt – apokatastasis, as an invocation in reference to good fortune hidden within apparent misfortune. Head over to read the rest of the prompt which asks us to refrain from sadness and try celebrating “the undoing”.

Poets United says: Here we hunger for poetry; writing it, reading it and sharing it.  Today you get to help us by feeding our starving minds with your words. Their prompt turns on the definitions of hunger. For the rest of the prompt and some photographs, visit.

Weekend Haiku & Limericks includes elk in their possible topics. How can you resist elk? What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week gives us a chance to tell Elizabeth the topics we would like her to put up for discussion. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for a Disney based prompt; and Friday for an uptodate roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 21/10/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Prompt Your Weekend Away

9:09 — Atlanta

Hello everyone. Bring on the weekend and, in my case, my husband’s Fall Break and Disney World.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that begins: In the Beatles’ song “Let It Be,” Paul McCartney sings the title phrase 41 times. Clearly the prompt has to do with repetition…or does it? Head over to find out and, if nothing else, sit back and enjoy Paul singing the song.

Over at dVerse, you will find a discussion on imitation as a tool in writing. If I use another poet’s work as a starting point for mine, I employ a device known as copy-change, which uses the structure of the copied poem, a scaffolding of words and lines, but my words are the dominant words. It is not an exercise I am good at, but it works well for many people..

Poetic Bloomings prompt saysThis week, to do our part in this poetic economy, we are providing a “two-fer” – two prompts for the price of one. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt, and the poems by the hosts in response. Yes, that’s right, from his sickbed, in what I am sure is a contravention of doctor’s orders, Walt has his contribution.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are from a couple of contributors and Brenda’s family. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry on Tuesday gives the opening few words from Joseph Heller’s Catch 22. To see the words and read an extract from the novel, visit the site. I notice that Keith has a whole new look over there.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: The Call. Not call, but the call. That can go in a whole lot of directions.  And One Single Impression offers river, another word that offers infinite possibilities.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is to write a poem to do with Friends, relationships and everyone around.  And looking towards next week, they will focus on Longing, Loss, Losing and Failure.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week they have a painting that I covet. I would love to have it hanging on my wall. However, for poetic purposes, we have a couple of possibilities: a little sci-fi, a nursery tale, a metaphor…

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday is going mad for Marilyn Monroe and other Ms.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are admire, follow, and piece. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems gives us a term for finding a silver lining within the process of falling apart, their focus for this week’s prompt – apokatastasis, as an invocation in reference to good fortune hidden within apparent misfortune. Head over to read the rest of the prompt which asks us to refrain from sadness and try celebrating “the undoing”.

Poets United says: Here we hunger for poetry; writing it, reading it and sharing it.  Today you get to help us by feeding our starving minds with your words. Their prompt turns on the definitions of hunger. For the rest of the prompt and some photographs, visit.

Weekend Haiku & Limericks includes elk in their possible topics. How can you resist elk? What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week gives us a chance to tell Elizabeth the topics we would like her to put up for discussion. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

Remember, I will be dark next week. I will think of you as Tuesday and Friday come and go [okay maybe a fleeting thought, but a thought]. I shall again make use of ViV’s brilliant suggestion: Put last week’s post up and people can go to the homepage for the latest prompts. I have pre-published today for next Friday as well. Don’t be confused when you think you have seen a prompt before. You have.

I shall see you the following Tuesday for a Disney based prompt; and the next Friday for an uptodate roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 14/10/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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