RSS

Tag Archives: Robert Lee Brewer

Poem Tryouts: Content = Form

8:18 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to a vociferous mourning dove

Hello, all. Surviving? I hope you enjoyed reading the poems posted this past week. I loved reading both the familiar and the new. We might have to have another reading day sometime.

One item of interest, which some of you will have seen on my Facebook wall: Many of you know Sasha Palmer, aka The Happy Amateur. Sasha has just written and submitted to a competition, a short story ‘Born’. The competition is based on fan votes and Sasha is in 1st place. Consider checking the story out and if you enjoy it, rate it.

First go to: booktrack.com [you do not have to sign up, or log in]
Then enter: hughhoweyfanfic in the search box

Sasha’s story is in the top line, Ist, ‘Born’. She also created the sound track. Enjoy!

Now, let me give you something to tussle with and distract you from any summer woes. Today, I want you to try a form you have never written in. I know, but it’s good for you. It’s good for your poetry, too. At its best, form enhances content.

Last week, I gave you two places to look: The Academy of American Poets and Robert Lee Brewer’s list at Writer’s Digest. You may have your own site — in which case, do let us have the link.

Where to start? Pick your topic and then read over some of the forms you haven’t tried to find one whose technique suits your theme. Or, find the form you have been meaning to conquer and figure out a topic that will work well with it. Then, tussle. That’s the fun part.

See you next Tuesday when we shall write a blazon, a form that fascinates me, thus appears each summer. It’s a form I think we can play with beyond its original intention.

I look forward to seeing the forms you choose.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
28 Comments

Posted by on 22/07/2014 in exercises, poetry, Summer

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Poem Tryouts: We Read Poems, Too

7:18 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to the sound of the computer fan [I, too, will be glad to get back to my music]

Hello, all. Halfway through the summer, I hope we are all surviving. I thought you might like something a little different, this week. I want you to consider some of your favourite poems by other people. They can be contemporary, or classic(al), the poets alive, or dead. Pick the one that you love enough to share with other people and post it for us to read.

For those who are saying, ‘But, I want to write something,’ you can write a mirror poem to the one you are sharing, or a response poem. Or, talk about what it is you love about the poem. My favourites move around, but there are a few that stay, such as Coleridge’s Kubla Khan, which I love purely for the sound. I always read it aloud. Then there is James Wright’s:

Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy’s
Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota

Over my head, I see the bronze butterfly,
asleep on the black trunk,
blowing like a leaf in green shadows.
Down the ravine behind the empty house,
the cowbells follow one another
into the distance of the afternoon.
To my right, In a field of sunlight between pines,
two droppings of last year’s horses
blaze up in golden stones.
I lean back, as evening darkens and comes on.
A chicken hawk floats over, looking for a home.
I have wasted my life.

The poem is about as summery as imagery gets [no, that is not a requirement]. I love the feel of the poem, as I read it. So, start thinking and let us have your favourites, to while away a pleasant afternoon.

I have hopes of getting to last week’s poems, but no guarantees that I can comment. I shall endeavour. Meanwhile, I shall see you next Tuesday when we will investigate forms. That’s right, I said forms. Now stop groaning. I’ll give you a couple of places to look. The Academy of American Poets gives a list with a brief definition. You can pick a couple and Google them; or, Robert Lee Brewer, of Writer’s Digest, has a list and if you click on the link, you will be taken to a ‘how to’ page. Oh, and you must pick a form you have not tried.

Happy reading and writing, everyone.

 
18 Comments

Posted by on 15/07/2014 in exercises, poetry, Summer

 

Tags: , , ,

Poetics Serendipity: National Poetry Month

8:17 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to If sung by Petula Clark

Hello, all. Let’s see where we are: four days away from April 1 and the beginning  of a poem a day for many of us. For those who think we are nuts [and those participating are among them], you will have an abundance of prompts throughout the month to play with, try, stash, whatever you wish. The rest of us? Well.

1] Robert Lee Brewer is justifiably excited over what is quite a coup on his part. His Poem-a-Day, aka PAD, takes an interesting twist this year, with guest judges, one for each day of the month. If you head over to his place, you will see a list of the judges. Amazing.

2] Quickly’s will be on tap for the month with her refreshingly bracing style. I’m sending you to her pre-game pep talk.

3] NaPoWriMo is gearing up. They were on my list last year and I used some of their prompts [I had a buffet style: I picked and chose from among all the prompters]. At the moment they are counting down. Today’s post has links to some new poetry sites, one of which will provide your phone with a poem every day. I was excited until I found it’s for iPhones only. I’m excited for them. Really.

4] While the Found Poetry Review’s challenge is a closed one, there is no reason you cannot follow along and select some of their prompts to try. I shall post their prompt each day along with my response. The challenge, as I mentioned previously, is to write with Oulipian constraints and source the poems from our daily newspapers. The link takes you to this blog.

5] From Quillfyre’s comment below: This is the second year that The Poetry Superhighway plans a NaPoWriMo event. Last year I recall some great prompts from them. Here’s the link from the website, which in turn points to a FB page for posting the responses: http://poetrysuperhighway.com/psh/category/napowrimo/poetry-writing-prompts-2014/

If you know of another site participating, let me know and I will add it.

I shall see you tomorrow for the prompt roundup and then not until May for the regular blog postings, but every day for oulipo work.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
18 Comments

Posted by on 27/03/2014 in exercises, poems, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: TGIF

7:57 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the Kingston Trio singing Reuben James

pen-and-pencil-thHello, all. You’re not there, are you? I’m speaking to an empty room. All of you are writing, writing, writing, aren’t you? After all, you have energy and freshness… for now. Yes, it’s an evil grin. For those who are not part of November’s madness, here are this week’s prompts.

Look who’s back:’If you’re doing a daily writing practice, please consider these as options! They’re not going to be my usual philosophical windings, though. My process for building these is going to be soulless and mechanical’. It’s good we love the boy. With garlands and wreaths, head over to Joseph’s Renovations for the first prompt of the month.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives us a prompt that embraces the spirit of Halloween, but allows us to not do Halloween. She suggests we ‘focus on writing a poem in which we create an aura of suspense and mystery. To help with this, let’s be specific and use ekphrasis‘. Head on over to see the image and read what else she has to say.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a Max Ernst painting. People seem to be having a problem with it… low numbers. Remember the image is there to spark a poem; you do not have to write a poem that is recognisably about the image. You might write a poem about curves.

Laurie, at Poetry Jam, appeals to our desire for comfort. Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she gives us a bag full of goodies. Granted Halloween is done, go on over and enjoy the different songs she found for the occasion. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have costumes, confrontations, and childhood fears.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry invites us to ‘join in the Blog4Peace drive on Monday, 4 November‘. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Pamela Sayers talks to us about the Day of the Dead, a festival in Mexico that celebrates the dead with colour and fun. Visit to read what Pamela tells us.

At Poets United Verse First where simple notions prompt amazing poems — gives us the first traditional Halloween prompt with a direction to write about ‘ghosts, spirits and scares‘. Go on over to see what they say.

brownwood-bunny-header Miz Quickly has been playing with themes again, her blog’s not poetry [I have a strong desire for pumpkin pie]. She retires from the field for a couple of months, but invites us to rejoin her in January.

Over at dVerse, I have given you the general address, which means, your choice. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Haul out the crock pot. it’s time for hot apple cider and brandy.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our a narrative prompt; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone. OCALHand_Writing

 
11 Comments

Posted by on 01/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetics Serendipity

9:18 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to If You Got It sung by Gordon Lightfoot

Hi, everyone. My brain has been stalling all morning. Not on other things, just this post. I have hauled it squealing and whining and we are here.

1] The first link is to a wonderful interview with poet Dana Gioia, in The Writer. Titled ‘Collaborating With Language’, Gioia talks about his process for writing. Reading his responses to the questions put to him is like having a mini-workshop.

2] The second link, I found from poet James Brush. I was going to link to his page, when I realised that was just so you can link to where we want to end up. It seemed silly. So credit to James and here’s a direct link to The Poetry Storehouse. I’m going to use the same paragraph he chose, because it’s pretty explanatory:

The Poetry Storehouse is an effort to promote new forms and delivery methods for page-poetry by creating a repository of freely-available high-quality contemporary page-poetry for those multimedia collaborative artists who may sometimes be stymied in their work by copyright and other restrictions. Our main mission is to collect and showcase poem texts and, in some instances, audio recordings of those texts. It is our hope that those texts will serve as inspiration or raw material for other artistic creations in different media.

Go on over. You might recognise a couple of the poets who have sent in their poems. Yes, James is the grackle man, for those who were around when he published the chapbook. Here’s a link to his blog, should you want to wander around: Coyote Mercury.

3] Author Orna Ross has a post on freewriting that is worth a read: F-R-E-E Writing: Using Images to Release Your Creativity. She talks about the importance of detail through sensory imagery.

Okay, everyone, I hear the engines revving. Robert Lee Brewer’s PAD Chapbook Challenge [see guidelines] and NaNoWriMo [see my post: All Things NaNoWriMo for links] begin tomorrow. Good luck to all and I shall cheer you on from the sidelines.

I shall see you tomorrow [if you lift your pen from paper long enough] at the week’s roundup of prompts; next Tuesday for the first of our narrative prompts; and next Thursday for links.

Happy writing, all.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 31/10/2013 in poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: Storing Up For the Winter

8:42 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Don McLean singing Mountains o’ Mourne

pen-and-pencil-thHello, all. Forget your families; forget your jobs; forget about eating (here’s your chance to try out the thirty new varieties of vegetable chips). Not only do we have NaNoWriMo coming down the pike, but Robert Lee Brewer’s November ‘poem-a-day towards a chapbook’ contest.  Oil those brain gears.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda selects words from Beauty Supply, by Lee Ann Brown. It’s a complex grouping and that’s what makes working them fun. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is giving us a chance to vent. She calls her topic ‘Rantables’. Head over and let her take you through the steps of having your rant and turning it into a poem.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag is on a one week break to celebrate Tess Kincaid’s birthday. Next year, I’ll try to remember to pre-post so we can join her on the 20th.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, tells us to look in a mirror. Head over to read what he says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words the photograph on Wonder Wednesday’s post, speaks to our fears. Between her own poem, her wondering and the title of the post, we are given a richness of possibilities for poems. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. We have an article of clothing, experimentation, and the art of appreciating.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

Ooh! At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry’s Challenge is about the language of flowers. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Pamela Sayers wants us to write about windows and doors. So many possibilities. Go on over to read what she says. (I have one this week, Pamela!)

At Poets United Verse First where simple notions prompt amazing poems — gives us the topic of food and writing (vegetable chips, anyone?). Visit to see what they say.

brownwood-bunny-header Miz Quickly offers two prompts a week, so I will always give you the general address. This week is a little different. We have a series of six prompts that stem from one image and that work off each other and together. It’s a heck of a lot of fun, so if you haven’t been over, go. Visit and see what it’s all about.

Over at dVerse, Tony Maude gives us the Rondeau in Form for All. There is much more to the crafting of a Rondeau than you might think and they are fun to build. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Cider on tap.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone. OCALHand_Writing

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 25/10/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Your Poetics Serendipity@ Thursday Thoughts

7:45 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Sandman sung by America

Hello, everyone. I hope all is well or, at least, tolerable. I have a few places for you to explore, or to escape into.

1] How many of you get excited by the mere mention of a mind map? I hear ‘mind map’ and my brain says, ‘Ooh!’. I have never stopped to analyse the reaction, but I am aware of it. Flikr has a site that gathers, at last count, 629 different mind maps. I often use mind maps in my early drafts of poems, and in writing down the words from The Sunday Whirl. As I wandered through the pages, I realised that a mind map can become a poem in itself. Even if you don’t mind map, this site has an awesome collection.

2] On the site Write to Done, I read an article, ’20 Strategies For Tackling That “Bottomless Pit” of Writing’ and found much that resonates. My theory in choosing sites for you is that if it resonates in any way with me, it will resonate with many of you, so a bottomless pit it is. Many of you will be familiar with the strategies but, if you are like me, you may have forgotten. I find rereading something like this reminds me there are escape routes. As the author, Ollin Morales, says: Warriors never fear bottomless pits. They welcome them and beat them to the dust. I love the image.

3] The web site, Creative Writing Now, is a place to get lost in. Their mission: a place ‘where you’ll find creative writing courses, ideas, prompts, free online classes, and step-by-step guides to writing fiction, poetry, and drama. CWN was created by writing teachers as a free service to provide a supportive and friendly place for authors and poets at all stages in their writing lives.’  I’m thinking this is particularly useful for beginning writers, but there is much to explore. As with the bottomless pit strategies, repetition never hurts. I rediscover things buried deep under all the new things I learn.

4] April cometh and you know what that means: madness in the form of National Poetry Month. Are you girding your loins? Many of you participate in Robert Lee Brewer’s Poem A Day (known affectionately as PAD), and I have seen other similar things go by. Kelli Agodon sponsors a poetry giveaway. I have participated in that for three years, now. [Hm. Note to self: Procure chapbooks for the giveaway] I will have links for all, closer to April. For now, I have the opening salvo from Poets.org. Check out the poster [right side, top, and the badge for blogs, left side top.

That should be enough to be doing. I shall see you tomorrow for the prompt roundup and then, not until Tuesday, March 4, for our next prompt.

Happy exploring, all.

 
11 Comments

Posted by on 28/02/2013 in poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

  • creative commons license

  •