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Poetics Serendipity

8:12 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to Spirit in the Sky sung by Norman Greenbaum (one hit wonder)

Hail. I thought I’d try a different salutation. Fall continues to fall on most of the northern hemisphere. Some places are even rushing into winter. Me, here? Oh no. Let me dive into links before I become maudlin, again.

1] My grammar nerdly self was excited enough by the semi-colon, but this week I have the exclamation point. This punctuation mark I forbade use of, by my students, unless an actual exclamation was involved: Oh! Damn! Nuts! Look out! Aha! You get the point. If what you are writing is exclamatory, the words should tell the reader. If you have to use an exclamation point as emphasis, you haven’t chosen the right words, or the thing isn’t due a mark, at all. Check out How To Use An Exclamation Point Properly (& How Not To Use It) written by Julia McCoy, for Grammarly.

2] It’s time to check in with Poets & Writers with their Tools for Writers, where they occasionally update opportunities for submissions and jobs in the literary world. Scroll down and look to the right column when you get to the page.

3] Let’s round off with a cartoon from The Writer’s Circle’s Facebook page.

Nice and light, this week. I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt, possibly borrowed. We haven’t done one of those in a while. I’ll go  riffle through my books. And, I shall see you next Thursday for links and such.

Happy national poetry day and happy writing.

 
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Posted by on 08/10/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity

7:27 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to Lady sung by Kenny Rogers, one of my favourite voices

Hello, all. My apologies about Tuesday. Remind me not to say I will post the day after getting back from a road trip. I have a diversity of links today. Let’s see what to pick…

1] An Ear for Poetry, written by Julian B. Gewirtz and Rachel R. Kolb, for The Poetry Foundation, is a fascinating discussion of what that metaphor means to someone who is deaf. Kolb approaches the topic from the point of view of both a reader and a writer of poetry. She then broadens the discussion by applying the metaphor to the community at large. The essay is long, but well-worth the read.

2] We are going to get technical. I feel almost as strongly about the correct use of the dash and the hyphen as I do about the Oxford comma, especially as it pertains to clarity in writing, or understanding, a poem. At The Writer’s Circle, Mary Norris, copyeditor for The New Yorker explains the difference between a hyphen and the two types of dashes (I was fascinated to learn why they are called an en dash and an em dash) in a short video.

3] For anyone wondering whether to get their MFA, Poets & Writers has put out their guide for 2016.

4] This last, I have a feeling I may have posted, but it’s worth repeating. Poets & Writers has developed an app, Poets & Writers Local. The first feature alone is worth the downloading: Find local readings, book signings, poetry slams, open mics, and other literary events. Search by author or venue. Save events to your personal calendar. View exact locations utilizing your device’s map. Share event info with friends. The download is free and available for both the iphone and android.

Have fun with these. There’s a lot of territory to cover. I will be back on Tuesday for our prompt; and next Thursday for links.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
10 Comments

Posted by on 17/09/2015 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Take One

first photo 3

7:51a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Firehead sung by Infinity Girl

Hello, all. It looks like a sunny day outside. My husband is at his final day of work and then he will be retired, officially. We were bemused to see a piece of paper he was handed earlier this week, titled: Separation Notice. Yikes! The state of Georgia is divorcing him. Texas, here we come.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the photograph. As with poetry, a viewer’s interpretation may not be what an artist intends. The image is titled Beyond Hope. I see almost the opposite. Check out their other prompts for the week.adele kenny

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele talks about a personal poetry pharmacy from which we can draw for our therapy poems. Poems centred around deeply felt emotions are some of the hardest to write well. But, their importance as therapy is boundless. Visit to see what she says on the topic of therapy poems.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy wants us to let a coffee shop be our poem starter. Head over to read what she says.

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us a black and white photograph by Toni Frissell. It’s one of those photographs that holds on, both while studying it and after leaving it. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole. Take a look.

Found Poetry Review The FPR is looking at propaganda posters. Beth gives us a wonderful link to a page of poster thumbnails — if you hover your cursor over a thumbnail, it will show you the text. Head over. (If you find a different prompt, Thursdays is changeover day.)

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are maps, specialty dishes, and tributes.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Susie gives us flowers. She has images and quotes to help us on our way, but the most inspirational thing in the post, for me, is when Susie says imagine surfing through velvet brilliance or the sky smelling of orchids. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us sustainability as our motif. Visit to read Susan’s quotes and a poem by Ginsberg.cooltext1387356024

Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge I have to laugh at myself. When I see this site coming up, I begin to happily anticipate what Jez has put together for one of his multi-faceted prompts (It’s okay, Jez — after a month you’ll be a regular and I won’t keep putting you to the blush). Check out the possibilities.sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with summer.

dverseOver at dVerse I chose the Open Link Night. I don’t think I have done that before, but Bjorn talks about us using images with our poems. As many of us do, I thought you might like to see what he says, but, more importantly (:-)), he gives us a fabulous link. I don’t know if you know of Wikiart, but if you head to the bar, Bjorn is waiting.

See you Tuesday for the next dream prompt; Thursday for links and such; and the following Tuesday (I hope — I’ll have our dates sussed out at some point) for the third dream prompt. Wordgathering will be dark next Friday, while my husband and I drive to Missouri.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
15 Comments

Posted by on 05/06/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetics Serendipity

8:32 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Audrey Assad singing Show Me

Hello everyone. Whichever of you is in charge of keeping time from galloping away is losing control. See to it, please. The rest of you can play.

1] A little while back I posted Murphy’s Laws for Writers, Pt. 1. A couple of days ago, part 2 landed in my inbox. Head over to read Peter’s laws for writers. He provides a link to Part 1, if you haven’t seen them, or don’t quite remember. I like many things about Peter’s laws. For one thing, he knows what of he speaks; for another, they are short.

2] Poets & Writers continues to update and present us with databases. A couple of weeks ago I gave you a link to contests. Today, how about a database of magazines? There are only about 1,000. Start winnowing. Create your own database.

3] I mentioned Miz Quickly’s return a couple of days ago, but this is the official announcement. Miz Q, she comes and goes. We never know quite when she will pop up and when she might disappear, so get your rabbit hunting gear on and visit. She’ll give us a prompt a day, until she doesn’t. You have only missed three, so head over.

Let’s see, something nice and short, something in which to lose yourself, and something to inspire. My work here is done. See you tomorrow for the week’s roundup of prompts; Tuesday for my prompt; and Thursday for more links and things.

Happy writing, all.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 04/06/2015 in links, poems, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

first photo 310:03 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to the Silk Road Ensemble with Yo Yo Ma

Hello, all. Need a few prompts to take your mind off things? Here we go.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the image with its photograph of tattooed wrists, but also, the haibun opportunity at fairy tale. Check out their other prompts for the week.adele kenny

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele gives us a prompt that helps us take a memory and write that memory into a poem. Her tips and guidelines give us a process. Visit.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy asks us to try creating a new spin on the fairy tale Alice In Wonderland. There are so many possibilities. A haibun might be an interesting form to use. But, what caught and held me, for quite a while, is the image Stacy has accompanying the prompt. My inspiration would come from it. Head over to read what she says.

Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. This week’s rhyming word has intriguing possibilities. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one or two.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us a Still Life, 1907, by John Frederick Peto. I find it remarkably compelling. Consider the textures of things. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole. Take a look.

Found Poetry Review Beth has added a twist, a challenge, to her prompt. The source text concerns lithography, but she asks us to create a remix poem concerning anything other than lithography. Head over.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready. Even if you don’t wordle, it’s fun to see how she lays the words within a photograph.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are maps, picture a story, and making connections. Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Isadora tells us to get our groove on. I love her idea for freeing our minds if only for the moments between dance and paper. Head over.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us weeds as our motif. I love the quotes she gives us, almost all of which support weeds. Go on over and read.

Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge I am officially hooked on the way Jez presents his prompts.  I find myself anticipating arriving at his page to see what he has for us. You like ekphrastic? Go for it. You like  possibilities for found sources? Yep. Ideas for a theme? Sure. Check out the possibilities.sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. If you haven’t tried one yet, you should, especially if you like found poetry (but it isn’t necessary).  Head over to see what she does with mind.

dverseOver at dVerse Gabriella talks to us about the poetry of the everyday. You might want to check the prosody post, as well, even if just to read. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for our first prompt of the summer; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
8 Comments

Posted by on 29/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall — Remember

first photo 38:02 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to Seals & Crofts singing King of Nothing

Hello, all.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the image with its photograph of two red shoes, oddly compelling. Check out their other prompts for the week.adele kenny

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele has a guest prompter, this week: Me.It was odd to arrive at her site and see me. I had forgotten, briefly. At any rate, the prompt focuses on a sense of place and I talk more than usual, as I discuss what a sense of place entails. Visit.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready. They are an interesting collection, sourced from a Naomi Shihab Nye piece. Go on over.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy is giving us one of her guided prompts. I love these. Even if you are feeling at your least creative, if you follow the steps, you will have a poem. You can take it from there. Stacy is good at these, so see what she says about summer. Visit.

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us an exquisite artwork by Ulrike Bolenz. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole. Take a look.

Found Poetry Review The FPR’s focus is graduation speeches: select any current or past speech. If you are attending a graduation, jot down notes to reuse later. Beth provides several links for us to look for a source text. Head over.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are personal truths, stranded, and sunflowers.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Fireblossom talks lists. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us happiness as our motif. Visit to read the examples she has chosen, to inspire us, especially a brief video of Alfred Hitchcock defining happiness.

Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge I love the black and white photograph Jeremy has and found myself already working on one of the phrases he gives us this week. Check out the possibilities.sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with blue.

dverseOver at dVerse I have left the choice to you. When you arrive at the site, scroll down a bit and you will see the choices for the week. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for an image prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 22/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall — And, Again

first photo 37:42 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to America (to a backing chorus of the dish washer) sung by Neil Diamond

Hello, all.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is Heeding haiku with HA — the prompt involves Debussy and a piece of his music. Check out their other prompts for the week.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele has a post for the files: What Editors Look For. If publishing adele kennypoems is part of your goal it’s not a bad idea to think about what makes particular poems compelling enough to publish, she writes. I thought it might be interesting to poll some poetry journal publishers and poetry editors (print and electronic) to gather some ideas about the qualities of poetry that editors want for their journals. Not only do we hear from several editors, but we have magazines to check out.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. For her return prompt, Stacy has a photograph. I found myself staring at it for quite a while. Take a look.

 

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us a photograph. Interesting. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole.

Found Poetry Review Recovering: Stand by.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are mothers, alternate future, and made of glass.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Marian offers a musical prompt with a Seussian touch. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Sumana gives us waves as our motif. Visit to read the examples she has chosen, to inspire us.sasha

We have a new contender, Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge, on Thursdays. I have looked at several of Jeremy’s past prompts and they are fun because he gives us many possibilities. We have possible themes, poetic lines, and images. Choose one, two, or mix a bunch. He asks for both poetry and flash fiction, depending on what strikes you. Go on over and ‘meet’ him. Try a prompt.

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with philosophy.

dverseOver at dVerse Bjorn talks to us about antithesis. It’s an interesting discussion and always a fun topic to deal with in a poem. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for one of my prompts; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 15/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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