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Poetry Freeforall: One Month Down

first photo 308:18 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Poems sung by Mandy Patinkin

Hello, everyone. Massachusetts, are you with us? Have you dug out from under? I love to follow the Weather Channel when a storm is on and I couldn’t help but notice that this storm had no interest in any place other than Massachusetts. It was strange to watch it circling the state.

Let’s see how successfully techy I can be. I received a request from Tawnya Smith (who many of us know as Yousei) to post a submission opportunity. Tawnya is the Poetry Editor for The Mayo Review, the literary journal at her university. I took a screen-shot which appears to have worked well (and which, I notice, allows you to see what I’m up to with all the tabs). Note that the deadline is next Friday.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the image of the woman and lily pads. Check out their other prompts for the week.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda is having problems with her linking service, so be sure to read her note to us. Then, wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirls Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink

Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy is asking for one of my favourites: postcard poetry. By now, you know she always has suggestions and alternatives, so hie yourself over.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, asks us to try our hand at lunes, one syllable based and one, word based. Head over to read the full prompt and for Adele’s suggestions and tips.

Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a photograph that is somewhat surreal, partly because it’s a close-up. It’s pretty cool. Remember that you do not have to write about the whole, or write about the image directly. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Peggy gives several choices for a seasonal poem: this season, somewhere. Visit to see her photographs and read her ideas.FPR-200

At the Found Poetry Review we are given the annual Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation annual letter as our source material. Go over to see what the prompt says and for a link.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are messing with your favorites, glitter bomb, and snowtastrophe. Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

Hannah is here to transform our day with the beauty of nature. At imaginary garden with real toads Hannah gives us lavender. Go play with the toads.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us humour. Visit to read the poems and quotations Susan has chosen. See what she has to say on the topic and the other bits of inspiration she has for us.sasha

NEW ENTRANT: Yay! Sasha Alexandra (who many of us have known for a long time) enters the fray. She will be posting every Thursday at The Happy Amateur and is taking on Wikems. Don’t know what a wikem is? Head on over. You’ll like them.

 

dverseOver at dVerse Tony Maude challenges us to a form… his adaptation of a cinquain. These are hard, and therefore satisfying, to do well. Head to the bar. They love visitors; I smell hot apple brandy.

So many fun things to play with. I shall see you Tuesday for my prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for more prompt site roundups.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 30/01/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Challenge Yourself

first photo 308:19 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Yesterday’s Songs sung by Neil Diamond

Hello, everyone. Another week down and a weekend to write. Winter appears to have fled far, far North. Anyone feeling uneasy about February?

First, a reminder to submit to Gnarled Oak. They are reading for Issue 3, due out 15 April. To get an idea of what they are looking for, visit.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week involves a bit of play. You don’t want to create a monster? Then the other prompt that caught my attention is the haiku one. Check out their other prompts for the week.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda is taking time off while she travels. Watch this spot. If you join The Sunday Whirls Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink

Pink.Girl.Ink. Whoa! Stacy has changed the look of the site. Focus, Margo: The prompt is fun and based on the art of Tarot cards. You don’t have to own a set, or even believe in it. Think of this as an image prompt. To see her example cards and read what she says, go on over.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, gives us birds. Adele asks for a theme that somehow relates to or juxtaposes bird life and human life. She also gives us a list of birds and their symbolic associations. Head over to read the full prompt.

Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. I defy you to not enjoy writing a good limerick. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a photograph that would seem to be a What’s the story, kind of image. The photo needs close study, as there are many details not apparent, at first. Remember that you do not have to write about the whole, or write about the image directly. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Gabriella gives several choices for writing about writing, so visit to read her ideas.FPR-200

Oh, what fun. At the Found Poetry Review: “What does it mean when you dream you’re being chased by an elephant?” Or: “Can I get a book telling me how to be mistress of ceremonies at a musical orgy?” Go on over to find out what that’s about. I promise fun, even hilarity, even if you don’t end up with a poem.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are stability, going backwards, and maladies. Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

Mama Zen is in the house, at imaginary garden with real toads, where she gives us a quote from Poe and a question, as inspiration. Go play with the toads.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us fashion. Even if you are thinking ‘Fashion? Enh.’ go read the two poems Susan has chosen. See what she has to say on the topic and the other bits of inspiration she has for us.dverse

Over at dVerse Brian challenges us to a form… our choice. Then he wants us to, well, go see what he says. Head to the bar. They love visitors; I can hear the clinking of ice.

I shall see you Tuesday for my image prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for more prompt site roundups.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 23/01/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall

9:44 a.m. — Atlanta

not listening

In fact, I’m racing. Forgive me if the post sounds like it. We leave in an hour and a half for Asheville, North Carolina, to spend the weekend exploring The Biltmore. I thought we were leaving tomorrow. Hello, everyone. Strap yourselves in and I’ll take you through the last few sites I post regularly on Fridays plus one new site by way of Jules.

We’ll start with the new site. It’s pretty incredible and I look forward to getting to know it. Mindlovemisery’s offerings are rich and deep and plentiful. They give us a new prompt every day. Yes, that’s every day. The prompts include photo challenges, music videos, wordles, fairytale based prompts and short form exercises. A little something for everyone, I’m thinking. Go on over and explore. The blog thoughtfully includes a schedule — check left hand column.

Next up is a much beloved site, The Sunday Whirl. This was the site that taught me I could write a poem in under a month’s time, as we have two days to write and post once the words came in. Brenda, whose site it is, has a particular affinity for choosing words for her wordles.

I remember when I first came across Mad Kane’s Humor Blog, that my thought was to post the site a couple of times only, because of its focused field. I wasn’t sure how many of you would want to write limericks. Then I read the limericks that Madeleine writes, as examples, and realised limerick writing is a higher form of poetry than I had been aware of. I decided I didn’t care if you wanted to write limericks, or not; I was going to give you the opportunity every week.

Magpie Tales is the first image site I posted and while I post others now, remains the best. I say this because my tastes run with the things that appear. It isn’t necessarily that I like the photograph, or art piece, but that I can see the value for a prompt. The choices are brilliant.

The last three I am mashing together because they don’t have a distinct focus like limericks, but they offer solid prompts every week. We have Poetry Jam which always gives us image plus prompt; Light Words, where I seesaw back and forth between Carol’s photographs and photographs plus spark days; and finally Red Wolf Poems which offers, alternatively, wordles and regular prompts. As one of the prompters says: Barbara here. I’ll be one of your off-and-on prompters for the next few months. I’m a little odd, and my prompts are likely to follow suit. If they seem unruly, give them a good talking-to, shake them (gently. there’s not that much holding them together). They’ll work with you if you’re firm.

Yes, okay, there is me. Every Tuesday on Poem Tryouts, I offer a prompt; last Tuesday of the month, it’s an image.

Fun, yes? I look forward to next week when I present the full list as per usual. See you Tuesday for a borrowed prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the weekly presentation of prompt sites.

Happy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 19/09/2014 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Pick and Choose

7:49 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Rascal Flatts singing These Days

Hello, everyone. This is the final Friday roundup until August, so if you like having one source to check each Friday, rather than having a dozen bookmarked, just bookmark this page and you’ll find your way to each site’s most current prompt. Teachers: you are almost there. Hang on.

lady-holding-a-poem-card-tanzaku-thcasseopia-planetarium-constellation-th

 

 

 

Sepia Saturday, is a site that has been up since 2009! Their thing is photographs, old ones, yours or theirs. This week, long hair: you have to go look! I like this site more and more, partly because they lay out what’s coming up, but mostly because they suggest possibilities with each photograph — themes can be specific or universal. Head over and be sure to read ‘Ask Auntie Miriam’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda has our fourteen [Yes, fourteen. Deal.] weekly words. I love the source: Today’s words came from a Facebook conversation I had with fellow poet Pamela Kaler Sayers. We both contributed words to this week’s Whirl. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele talks about transport and travel. She gives us a little context in her arriving at the prompt and then her always fabulous guidelines and tips and examples.

There is an art to writing a limerick that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week — I laughed this week. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], Tess gives us quite a challenge. You can stare at the image for quite a while and be overwhelmed by the muchness of it. I notice not many have responded [at The Mag, 32 counts as not many]. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

At Poetry Jam, Peggy gives us age and aging of more than just people. Visit to see what she says.

carol Carol, at Light Words,is not quite at the dancing on tables stage, but she is back with a rocking prompt. Do you know what a palimpsest is? Whether you do or no, head over to see what she says. I found it fascinating as a possibility for a poem, either as structure or focus.

At the Found Poetry Review we are asked to remix a master remixer, Dylan — or erase.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have street naming, pet matchmaking, and underwater. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I couldn’t choose between Margaret’s new topic of sketch poems or Isadora’s curse poem. Go look at both. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoemsRed Wolf Poems gives us an image prompt, a painting of the River Walk in my home town, San Antonio. Visit Red Wolf.

The Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is best friends. Susan has several possible sources of inspiration for us. Head over.

dverseOver at dVerse, Meeting the Bar and Björn introduce the haibun, one of my favourite forms because of its versatility. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place and the ice is clinking.

Flashy Fiction Friday  isn’t up yet, so check a bit later.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post and leave your links with them!

The first summer prompt goes up Tuesday (explanation for newcomers).

OCALHand_WritingHave a wonderful summer (winter). Happy writing, everyone.

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Posted by on 30/05/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: What Do You Mean It’s Friday?

9:02 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Paul Simon singing The Boy in the Bubble

Hello, all. Is it my imagination, or are Fridays coming around with increasing frequency? I thought so. Let’s get to it, then.

lady-holding-a-poem-card-tanzaku-th

 

 

 

casseopia-planetarium-constellation-th

 

 

 

Sepia Saturday, is a site that has been up since 2009! Their thing is photographs, old ones, yours or theirs. If the old photos throw you, read what the prompter suggests for each: There are a host of possible themes you might like to follow ranging from the girls in their room to the pennants and banners on the wall or even that somewhat rudimentary plumbing next to the window — themes can be specific or universal. Head over and be sure to read ‘Ask Auntie Miriam’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda has our dozen weekly words. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele suggests we take on the unexplained. She gives a list of examples, but that’s in case you haven’t run across unexplained things in your life — what? You haven’t run into a chupacabra? You’ve sussed out crop circles? The tips she includes might work as a structure if started and gone down through. Just saying. If nothing else, stop by and read the example poems. There are some wonderful ones.

Never written a limerick? What are you waiting for? There is an art to writing one that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], Tess gives us an Edward Hopper painting — that got you moving, those who haven’t been over. We do love our Hopper, don’t we? Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

At Poetry Jam, Mary gives us rain, or the lack thereof. Visit to see what she says.

carol Hip replacement happening at Light Words. Hopefully, Carol will be her rocking self soon. I notice that she has begun to look around her and take photographs. Can dancing be far behind? Check to see what she is doing with black and white photos.

At the Found Poetry Review we are asked to remix a master remixer, Dylan — or erase.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have top five albums, Sunday drivers, and an abecedarian. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry discusses the device of the pathetic fallacy in poetry. I found it fascinating. There is a prompt at the end, but read the essay. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoemsRed Wolf Poems has a new giant wordle up. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s every other weekly prompt.

The Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is green. Do you know the etymology of ‘green’? Me either, and my reaction on reading what Susan found, was “Well, I’ll be damned’. She has all kinds of possible starting points for us. Head over.

dverseOver at dVerse, Meeting the Bar and ManicDDaily [aka Karen] talk about slant rhyme, something we should all cultivate. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place and the ice is clinking.

It’s character sketch time at Flashy Fiction Friday. Go see what the theme is.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post and leave your links with them!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; Thursday for the summer calendar; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, everyone.

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Posted by on 23/05/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: And Again

8:20 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Einaudi playing The Days

Hello, all. Get ready to settle into weekend mode and more writing.

lady-holding-a-poem-card-tanzaku-th

 

 

 

casseopia-planetarium-constellation-th

 

 

 

 

Sepia Saturday, is a site that has been up since 2009! Their thing is photographs, old ones, yours or theirs. This week’s theme revolves around sand and the seaside. Head over and be sure to read ‘Ask Auntie Miriam’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda chose our words from a Sherman Alexie poem, ‘Little Big Man’. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele addresses the ode. Don’t run. Listen a minute. She starts with a brief history, then gives us a set of guidelines and some tips, as well as several examples. If you have never tried to write an ode, this is going to be your best chance, with Adele holding our hands through the process. Go over and check it out and don’t be daunted by the length of the post. You can skip straight down to guidelines, if you wish.

No new wordle up. If you didn’t get a chance at this one, it‘s still up for grabs. Red Wolf Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt.

Never written a limerick? What are you waiting for? There is an art to writing one that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], we have a black and white photograph by Martin Stranka. I found it so compelling, I stopped a moment to read some of the poems. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Gabriella, at Poetry Jam, talks about friends and friendship. Visit to see what she says.

carol Hip replacement happening at Light Words. Hopefully, Carol will be her rocking self soon. I notice that she has begun to look around her and take photographs. Can dancing be far behind? Check to see what she is doing with texture in photos.

At the Found Poetry Review we are told to pillage some sports writing (nonviolently). How can you resist? Go on over and check out the prompt which has several interesting tidbits with it.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have rivals, comfort, and God’s work.Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Hannah is Transforming Friday with The Black Forest. To read what she says and see her collection of photographs, visit. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoemsAt Red Wolf Poems, Yousei admonishes us to polish the silver! To find out what it’s all about go on over. She gives us all the materials we need.

The Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is looking at bicycles. Susan has quotes, a photograph, a starter question, and a video for us. Head over.

dverseOver at dVerse, Meeting the Bar introduces us to a new form, created by one of its readers. The tilus is apparently simple but in its simplicity lies the challenge to write a good one. Go to it. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

I’m chuckling already at Flashy Fiction Friday. Go see why. It involves a headline and Elvis. Go see what it’s about.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post and leave your links with them!

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt on intelligence; Thursday for links on image stuff; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, everyone.

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Posted by on 16/05/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Here We Go

7:34 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Vivaldi

Hello, all. Ready for a week full of possibilities? Not everyone is back up and running, so I’ll leave markers.

lady-holding-a-poem-card-tanzaku-th

 

 

 

casseopia-planetarium-constellation-th

 

 

 

 

We have a new contender: Sepia Saturday, a site that has been up since 2009! Their thing is photographs, old ones, yours or theirs. Head over and be sure to read ‘Ask Auntie Miriam’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us our usual dozen. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a guest prompter who says ‘the best love poems walk right up to the edge of sentimentality but don’t go over the cliff. Here are four ideas for ways to enter the tricky terrain of the love poem’. Visit to read her ideas [I don’t know why the font has shrunk; nor will it unshrink]

Red Wolf Poems’ wordles are different from Brenda’s, so check them out at We Wordle. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s regular weekly prompt.

Never written a limerick? What are you waiting for? There is an art to writing one that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], we have Chair With the Wings of a Vulture, 1960, a sculpture by Salvador Dali. I thought I had seen most of his work. Clearly not. Have fun with this one. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Laurie Kolp, at Poetry Jam, invites us to join in the festivities. So, go.

carol  Hip replacement happening here. Hopefully, Carol will be her rocking self soon.

 

At the Found Poetry Review they are recovering from a month of setting and writing to 30 prompts. If you don’t know about Oulipo, head over and read some of the prompts and poems and give it a try, yourself.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have flowers, through a child’s eyes, and mama.Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I have met a new artist to love. Go on over to see who Fireblossom gives us for inspiration. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoems

 

 

The Poets United Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is looking at children. Head over to read what Susan suggests we do.

dverseOver at dVerse, Meeting the Bar presents us with conversational poetry. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

I love Walt’s presentation of today’s post at Flashy Fiction Friday: Homecoming. Go see what he has us coming home from.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post and leave your links with them!

I shall see you Tuesday for a doors and windows prompt; Thursday for the summer calendar; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, everyone.

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Posted by on 09/05/2014 in poetry

 

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