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Before and After Deja Vu

7:25 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Kingston Market with Harry Belafonte

Hello, all. Ready for pictures? I have a strange little collection for you to peruse. I came across these when P J Kaiser featured them in a blog post. I will give you the link to her blog, as they are her find. Once you arrive, you will find two links to collections of Irina Werning’s before and after photographs of people in Kaiser’s Inspiration Minute.

Stay with me a minute. Yes, you. I saw your hand dart for your mouse.

Werning, who is from Buenos Aires, says of this project: ‘I love old photos. I admit being a nosey photographer. As soon as I step into someone else’s house, I start sniffing for them. Most of us are fascinated by their retro look but to me, it’s imagining how people would feel and look like if they were to reenact them today… Two years ago, I decided to actually do this. So, with my camera, I started inviting people to go back to their future.’

As you skim through the photographs, pay attention to signals from your brain. You want to note the pictures that cause a blip, whether positive or negative. When the blip occurs, stop and jot immediate reactions, as well as any ideas that pop in, for a possible angle. Once you have been through the collections, narrow down your choices. If you cannot choose between a couple, meld them. Your poem isn’t about the photographs, so it doesn’t matter.

What should the poem be about? The people, or the story behind what you see. And, yes, you might want to use the conceit of your speaker coming across a couple of photographs and speculating, but you do not have to. Unlike last week, where we talked about the moment of shifting from before to after with an object, or place, with these you’ll probably want to have a brief acknowledgment of once and concentration on after, or the other way around. I hope that makes sense. The good news? Anything you write is right. Yes, I am cute.

You might want to try a portrait poem, where you transcribe into words what you see in the photograph. You can leave as is, or add the who, what, where, when. The photographs that elicit the strongest emotions are the ones you want to look at, to ask yourself what it is that attracts or repels you. Use what you discover as part of your speaker’s tone of voice.

Now you can go look!

I’ll see you Thursday for some thoughts on my insistence on jotting and noting; Friday, for the prompt roundup; and next Tuesday for a found prompt.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 29/01/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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See the Olympics: Tuesday Tryouts

7:41 a.m. — Atlanta

Listening to Rapid Transit Hula by The Brothers Cazimero

Hello, everyone. Today is our image day. I have a great image for us but am waiting for permission. The site’s owner is away from his computer for a few days, so next month, if he says yes.

Instead I am going to give you two links to some of the most incredible photography I have seen. Both sets are published by The Atlantic and both are sets of photographs from the Olympics. I think the second set, of the final days, is better, but that isn’t terribly relevant to this. What is, is the photography that allows us to see, frozen, that which we watched [or not] at a continuous pace.

Your poems do not have to have anything to do with the Olympics. Remember always, that an image is merely a spark for your brain. Nor, do your poems have to be about sports. Maybe an image will remind you of something you read, or saw, or were a part of. You do not have to mention what is happening in the photograph, at all. You can leave it behind, once the spark has ignited.

So, trawl through the photographs. Enjoy them. Jot notes for two or three of them that do spark possibilities. Look over your notes, mull, write, post.

If you have not been back to read the event poems that came from last Tuesday’s exercise, do. The results were fascinating in their diversity.

2012 London Olympics: The First 9 Days

2012 London Olympics: The Final Week

I shall see you Thursday for a grab bag. No one has announcements? Questions? Hmm? Friday, we’ll have our Freeforall; next Tuesday we are back to where we were at the beginning of the summer, with a prompt on self. As Poetic Bloomings is also doing that, I shall endeavour to make sure we differ, or not.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 28/08/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Photograph Bazaar: Your Serandipity at Thursday Thoughts

7:38 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. How are you? I am feeling particularly good because I am listening to the original version of “The Rock Island Line”. God, I love music! I don’t usually turn it on ’til later.

Today, we have no outside announcements… if I missed something, someone yell at me. I thought I would mention a couple of sites I use for photographs… oh, yeh, “Hawaiian Superman,” by Iz. Who needs coffee when there is music?!

1] One of my favourite sites, both for its extensive archives and its Flickr Photostream, belongs to the Smithsonian Institution. Aside from the site belonging to the Smithsonian — for me, like blowing bubbles and Crayola crayons, the Smithsonian retains the magic it has held for me since I was a child — I like the categorizing of many of the photographs into sets, as the sets comprise stories. Other than the sets, we have 129 pages of miscellaneous photographs to wander through.

If, when you arrive at their page, you scroll down the column on the right, you will see at the bottom More Sets. Click on it and you will be transported to all their photo sets. Belize Larval Fish Group anyone? Who wouldn’t check, right? I clicked and found myself looking at 45 tropical fish specimens, at least, colourful sections of tropical fish. When I clicked on a thumbnail I was taken to a page with the whole photograph and details. William H. Johnson’s World on Paper? I clicked and was surprised into an out loud ‘Wow!’. Talk about colourful art. Field Books of Waldo? I had no idea, but there was something about the title. Turns out Waldo Schmitt was a zoologist and collector and, ‘Images cover underwater collecting in Antarctica, specimens and their habitats, expedition participants and crew, and informal moments during field work‘.[Field Books of Waldo LaSalle Schmitt (1887-1977) Smithsonian Institution Flickr sets]

There is a certain amount of opening and closing of sets, as some of them are collections of people not doing anything particularly interesting, but if you are in treasure hunt mode, you won’t mind.

Another arm of the Smithsonian Institution Archives is their blog, The Bigger Picture, which is kept by several people. There you will find a number of interesting paths to explore through the visual archives, enough to keep you entertained for a long time, not to mention all those ideas for poetry and fiction. If you visit today, and notice yesterday’s ‘Sneak Peak,’ that would be my daughter’s name you see, not mine. [Beaming with pride? Oh yes.]

What’s more, the Smithsonian has boards on Pinterest, not as many as I have, mind you, but they’ll get there. The boards are put together from their incredibly extensive collections and might be an interesting source for us.

Thirty minute break… son calling with update on about to be first grandchild. It’s going to be a long two weeks.

2] Let me introduce you to P. J. Kaiser, pjk, and her blog Inspired by Real Life. She has one of the few blogs I subscribe to [there is only so much time] because of a weekly feature called ‘Inspiration Minute‘. The inspired minute sometimes focuses on a couple of images and sometimes a series of photographs. I have bookmarked so many, now, as possible poems, that I gave PJ her own folder. The latest series is one I have on an open tab until I have trained myself to check each day. Of it, she says: How would you like a site that has a new picture each day related to some story in the news?  Well, I’ve got one for you.  The Guardian has a feature called “Eyewitness” that has just that. Visit PJ for the link and explore back posts of ‘Inspiration Minute’.

…la da da dah… Jimmy Buffett and ‘Volcano’…

3] The next is a collection of seriously weird black and white photographs, but of strange things can poetry be made. The photoblog is called Black & WTF. Take a gander.

4] Finally, we have Shorpy ‘Always Something Interesting’. The site has a join for free, but that’s for people who wish to upload photographs. I have explored extensively without having to join. The archive has 600 pages, so far, and focuses on historical photographs.

Anyone still with me? I have a vision of all of you already lost in the collections. Enjoy. And then, write.

I shall see you tomorrow for Friday‘s roundup of prompts — we have a new entrant; next Tuesday for another facet of place; and next Thursday for more announcements. You are allowed to brag on Thursday’s announcements, if you wish. If you are shy, I’ll do it for you. After all, if you win a contest *cough Mark Windham*, or have a poem published, and really want to be excited with your cyber-friends, then tell me.

Whoa! San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Some Flowers in your Hair) by Scott McKenzie… flashback. Even better than music, or coffee? Music and coffee. I’m there as soon as I hit publish.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 16/02/2012 in poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Poetry Prompts to Keep You Going

7:56 p.m. — Walnut Creek

Hello all. Yes, I am a trifle late. Mom’s day in the city. I like to accompany her. Lunch at Japantown. Yum! That was my opening last night before my mom’s internet went wonky. I learned the panicky feeling people are beset with when they have a regular blog that goes out, not to mention the emails I knew were piling up! The time is now 11:45 a.m. and I am hoping to get this posted before something else happens.

We start, as always, with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that says: Today, I will ask you to take one of your “ugly” words and transform it into something beautiful. There are several ways to approach this….. To find out the ways and to see what Donna is talking about, you know what to do. If you missed last week’s because you wait until I post Friday, trawl back through her posts. You are looking for a prompt on reverse sonnets. I know! These both sound intriguing.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle, the words of which come from responses to the previous week’s wordle. And be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Poetic Bloomings, hosted by Maria Elena Good and Walt Wojtanik, asks us to try a Japanese form: This week our featured form is the Dodoitsu. The Dodoitsu is a fixed folk song form of Japanese origin and is often about love or humor. Visit the site to learn the structure, and read the poems by the hosts in response.

For Carry on Tuesday, we have a line from Shakespeare’s Hamlet: Neither a borrower nor a lender be. Play with it before going over to the site to see what others have written and for a link to read other lines from Hamlet. You will be surprised how many you know..

One Single Impression offers us respect which can be approached on many different levels. To find out more go over to the site. Check out some of the participants’ offerings while you are there.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James has three photographs ready for you to look at. They are lovely. If you use one, consider submitting your creation to Sunday Snaps: the Stories’  a collection of 52 photos and stories/poems. Susan is finalising submissions for her next book and has posted a deadline. Head to the stories’ link to read up on it.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I enjoy the whole site more every week. It is plain fun to browse. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Jingle Poetry’s ‘Monday Potluck’ offers us Life in Free Verse. Remember to pop by and check the site. Next week they want us to focus on art.

Visit Magpie Tales for our other image prompt. The painting is by Thomas Hart Benton and if you aren’t sure what to do with the whole, pick an individual or a small group to write on. Ask yourself what story just happened, or is about to happen, here.

For you alliterists out there, here is ABC Wednesdays letter for this week: Gad zooks!   Can you believe we have traveled from A to Z one more time on ABC Wednesday?  Head over to read the rest of the Z prompt and for a link to zydeco music, which is great fun.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are indecision, option, and fate. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source. I realised, this time, why what intrigues me more than the words are the definitions. A mini found poem can be written from them. When you look at the definition each week keep that in mind.

We Write Poems starts its prompt with: Elizabeth Crawford’s suggestion for our prompt is to use the dictionary (or thesaurus), find some words new to your vocabulary and use them in creating the poem you write this week! Go on over and read the rest of the prompt.

Poets United ends their prompt with: So this week we give you the prompt of loneliness. When does it strike you the most, the holidays after the family has left? When someone close to you has passed on? When you move away from your childhood home? When do you feel you’re most alone?. They always have more to help us choose possible paths, so go over and read the rest of the prompt and view the photographs. Loneliness is a powerful thing to write about.

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ says: Theta is the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet and the focus of our next alpha to omega challenge. Head over to see the two words chosen and to read their definitions.

New entry this week. I know several poets try their hand at flash fiction so thought I would include a site that looks open as far as focus and topic but is there as a place to post. I haven’t quite found my way around it but you younger brains out there may be able to figure it out. Flash 55 is a site hosted by the G-Man, who posts every Thursday…I think. Feel free to let me know in comments if you know how the site works. I did look for directions.

Remember to check out Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic is a series of ten questions. We may answer one, a couple, or all. Here’s a chance to get to know our fellow writers and cyber friends a little more.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a new form; Thursday for a discussion of a topic yet to be decided [Hey! I’m on vacation!]; and next Friday for more of the same. Happy writing, everyone.

P.S. If I disappear it’s my mother’s internet.

 
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Posted by on 16/07/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Poetry Prompts for That Summer Something

9:13 a.m. — Walnut Creek

Hello all. I hope you have had a good week and will have a relaxing weekend.

We start, as always, with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and an interesting prompt that says in part: We are talking word families here, words that are related through etymology!… To find out the steps and read two examples, head over to the Tow Truck and check out the rest of the prompt. I have already seen results from a couple of you.

 

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle, the words of which come from responses to the previous week’s wordle. This week’s is from three poems, one of which, I was tickled to see, was mine. And be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Poetic Bloomings, hosted by Maria Elena Good and Walt Wojtanik, has a regular prompt and a wild card prompt, this week. Visit the site and look it over, read the prompts and the poems by the hosts in response.

The line chosen by Carry on Tuesday is the first line of Edna St. Vincent Millay’s poem “First Fig”: “My candle burns at both ends“. I love the possibilities; play with it before going over to the site to see what others have written and for a link to read the poem.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: woods. And One Single Impression offers us crater which can be interesting metaphorically. To find out more go over to the sites. You might check out some of the participants’ offerings.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James has three photographs ready for you to look at. They play with visual texture and colour. If you use one, consider submitting your creation to Sunday Snaps: the Stories’  a collection of 52 photos and stories/poems. Susan is finalising submissions for her next book and has posted a deadline. Head to the stories’ link to read up on it.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I enjoy the whole site more every week. It is plain fun to browse. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides [I notice, this week, that she is becoming addicted to acrostic limericks, so if you need an extra challenge…]

Jingle Poetry’s ‘Monday Potluck’ offers us Siblings, Cousins and Friends. Remember to pop by and check the image that accompanies the prompt and also a new feature that involves music. Next week they are giving us a free topic week.

Visit Magpie Tales for our other image prompt. The painting is Wheatfield With Rising Sun, by Van Gogh. The colours are gorgeous, and I have seen at least one response from among you. If you aren’t sure what to do with a landscape, think of it metaphorically, or ask yourself what story just happened, or is about to happen, here.

For you alliterists out there, here is ABC Wednesdays letter for this week: Y. Again that is all I am giving you. The intro writer has been particularly creative to use the letter y. You should visit to enjoy the creativity. Read it for fun, if you don’t play.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are cease, heat, and nasty. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source. I realised, this time, why what intrigues me more than the words are the definitions. A mini found poem can be written from them. When you look at the definition each week keep that in mind.

We Write Poems starts its prompt with: Oft it is suggested to writers, find your own unique voice in how you write. Good advice. However this week we’re asking you to find, understand, and use another’s voice in the poem you’ll write! Head on over and find out what else is suggested. This will be interesting to watch, as the poems come in. I initially quailed, but the brain has started working on it.

Poets United asks us to Please pen a poem about reading; you can be general or specific. They always have more to help us choose possible paths, so go over and read the rest of the prompt and view the photograph.

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ is back after a brief vacation to continue the challenge. The letter this week is eta. Head over to see the two words chosen and to read their definitions.

And, while not a prompt, I want to remind people to check out Elizabeth Crawford’s new discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic is on revision of work, so is something we all should have an opinion on and interest in. I’ll revisit later in the week when the hammerers, cement layers, fibreglassers have finished the deck.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a new form [cue music for Jaws], Thursday for a discussion of a reader generated topic: freewriting, and next Friday for more of the same [and a new contender for those who write the occasional prose pieces]. Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 08/07/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Poetry Prompts Instead of Firecrackers

9:00 a.m. — Walnut Creek

Hello everyone. I hope all is well going into the weekend.

We start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that says in part: So this week, do some reading. Find a poem that is radically different from your writing.  (If you write imagistic free verse, find a tightly-metered rhyming poem. You get the picture.) Then follow the steps above to create your own poem that goes against type… To find out the steps and read the whole prompt head over to the Tow Truck and check out the rest of the prompt. It’s a challenge worth trying.

This is the last week for Writer’s Island and many of us feel the wrench. Losing two loved sites in a matter of weeks has cast a bit of a pall. But over on the island there is celebration of life. The final prompt says: So it is simple this week, please meditate on your vision of the future, be it for yourself, or loved one(s), or for the world — then share it with us… or let the image above spark your muse. Sail to the island for the farewell and to see the image and relax on the shores one more time.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle, the words of which come from responses to the previous week’s wordle. This week’s is from three poems. And be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Poetic Bloomings, hosted by Maria Elena Good and Walt Wojtanik, whom many of you know, have a form to follow this week: The Monchielle is a poem consisting of four five-line stanzas where the first line repeats in each verse. Each line within the stanzas consist of six syllables, and lines three and five rhyme. The rhyme pattern is Abcdc Aefgf Ahiji Aklml. Visit the site and look it over, read the prompt and the poems by the hosts in response.

The line chosen by Carry on Tuesday is: Is that all there is? from Peggy Lee. The question is interesting and might work as a repetition, so play with it before going over to the site to see what others have written and for a link to read the lyrics and hear the song.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: give, or a form of the word. And One Single Impression offers us a celebration of tau day. To find out more go over to the site. You might check out some of the participants’ offerings.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James has two photographs ready for you to look at. If you use one, consider submitting your creation to Sunday Snaps: the Stories’  a collection of 52 photos and stories/poems. Susan is finalising submissions for her next book and has posted a deadline. Head to the stories’ link to read up on it.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I enjoy the whole site more every week. It is plain fun to browse. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Jingle Poetry’s ‘Monday Potluck’ offers us Saints, Monks and Meditation. Remember to pop by and check the image that accompanies the prompt and also a new feature that involves music. Next week they are giving us Siblings, Cousins and Friends.

Visit Magpie Tales for our other image prompt. The photograph is visually intriguing. I’m not sure what I will do with it; I know I want to try something. I will need to think of the illustration as a metaphor…

For you alliterists out there, here is ABC Wednesdays letter for this week: X. That is all I am giving you. The intro writer has been particularly creative to use the letter x. You should visit to enjoy the creativity. Read it for fun, if you don’t play.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are bump, knuckle, and transfix. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source. These three words made me laugh, for some reason and I will try to get back to see what people did with them.

Part the curtains, swing the windows open wide! Take a fresh breath of sky, prepare to greet something old and make it new again! That’s our way to say with a flourish, take some older poem of yours, something you thought might be better expressed somehow, someday – that day is today! Revise or rewrite that poem. That is how We Write Poems starts its prompt. Head on over and find out what else is suggested. I dug my poem out this morning.

Poets United asks us to think and write about freedom: I would like to point out that freedom is so much more than a country or mind set. One can experience freedom in a million ways.  You can be a free spirit.  Freedom is being eleven years old and experiencing the first time your parents trusted you enough to leave you home alone. Freedom is the ability to have silence in a bustling household because dad decided to take the kids to the park. They always have more, to help us choose possible paths, so go over and read the rest of the prompt and view the photographs.

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ is taking a small break but Susan assures us she will be back after a brief vacation to continue the challenge.

And, while not a prompt, I want to remind people to check out Elizabeth Crawford’s new discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for another open prompt, Thursday for a discussion of sites worth visiting, and next Friday for more of the same. Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 01/07/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Poetry Prompts to Keep You Off the Streets

9:00 a.m. — San Antonio

Hello everyone. Have I told you lately how much I appreciate you all? No? I didn’t think so. Well, I do. Now let’s see what we have to play with this weekend.

We start our going into the weekend with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that says: For today’s prompt, we are going to use some song lyrics about summer as jumpstarts for new pieces.…. Donna gives us several songs to get us in the mood, as well as possible directions we might take. Head over to the Tow Truck and check out the rest of the prompt.

We sail to Writer’s Island next where the word of the week is threshold. Head to the island to read their definitions, which I found fascinating. This is the penultimate prompt from the island which will be closing down in one week.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle, the words of which come from responses to the previous week’s wordle. This week’s is from one poem. Go on over to see what others have done.

We have a new entrant for your delectation: Poetic Bloomings, hosted by Maria Elena Good and Walt Wojtanik, whom many of you know. They have a poetic prompt every Sunday. Visit the site and look it over, read the prompt and the poems by the hosts in response.

The line chosen by Carry on Tuesday is: Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee, from Muhammad Ali. The line is fun, so play with it before going over to the site to see what others have written and for a link to read other quotes from Ali. I have seen several of the responses and enjoyed the writers’ creativity.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: opportunity. And One Single Impression, offers us wind. I noticed that they say in their about: One Single Impression is a community of poets writing and sharing haiku and other poetic forms.You might check out some of the participants’ offerings.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James has two photographs ready for you to look at. If you use one, consider submitting your creation to Sunday Snaps: the Stories’  a collection of 52 photos and stories/poems. Susan is finalising submissions for her next book and has posted a deadline. Head to the stories’ link to read up on it.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I enjoy the whole site more every week. It is plain fun to browse. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays. and a lot more besides.

Jingle Poetry’s ‘Monday Potluck’ offers us Void, Loneliness and Sorrow. Remember to pop by and watch the video with which they accompany their prompts. Next week they are giving us Saints, Monks and Meditation.

Visit Magpie Tales for our other image prompt. The photograph is visually intriguing. You can do a portrait poem, or focus on the included details of the image.

For you alliterists out there, here is ABC Wednesday‘s letter for this week: Did you have some winnings this weekend playing whist?  Maybe you have read Wuthering Heights?  When did you last enjoy a whiskey sour?  Were you watching the US Open golf tournament, all the while wishing you could golf as well as Rory McIlroy?   Do you love the Wookies of Star Wars?  Are you interested in World War I or World War II?   Of course, you can find something on the world wide web!. Go on over to enjoy the rest of the alliteration. The author of the prompt had so much fun with W that we have an essay. Go read it for fun, if you don’t play.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are gag, maintain, and omit. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source. These three words are an interesting pick.

This is part two to last week’s prompt. In that prompt we asked you to stay close and simple, observe and describe. That is now the foundation for the prompt this week. This week we’d like to suggest you move your observations farther out into the world, go out the door, maybe down the road – both physically and as how you relate to your observations. That is how We Write Poems starts its prompt. Head on over and find out what we are to observe and what we are to do with what we observe, this week. It was such fun reading everyone’s contribution to this.

Poets United asks us to: Pick an inanimate object from anywhere and write from its perspective. It could be anything anywhere. Look at the things around you and imagine what poetry they would write. They always have more, to help us choose possible paths, and this week’s suggestions are particularly provocative, so go over and read the rest of the prompt and look at the charming and funny illustrations

For our last prompt we have Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘. We should be onto ita this week, but as of post time the word had not been changed, so if you are keeping up with this, head over and track down the latest. I have given you the link to this past week and if you look at the left sidebar you’ll see the Greek letters listed. They are also the links.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday for another open prompt, Thursday for a discussion of something I have yet to decide, and next Friday for more of the same. Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 24/06/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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