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Poetics Serendipity

8:51 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The House You’re Building sung by Audrey Assad

Hello, everyone. Shall we get to it? I had a bit of a lie in and my brain isn’t even up to talking about the weather (and that’s one of my favourite topics — for real). Let’s see what we have.

1] First up, an announcement. There was much popping of metaphorical corks earlier this week when Robert Lee Brewer announced the winners of his November PAD chapbook contest. I heard the corks because two of the top five are people I know and whose names you have seen on this blog’s Tuesdays, often. Out of one hundred manuscripts, here are the top five:

  1. A Good Passion, by Barbara Young
  2. A Nest of Shadormas, by William Preston
  3. The Staircase Before You, by Jess(i)e Marino
  4. Lives Other Than Our Own, by James Von Hendy
  5. 1991 Winter, by Marilyn Braendeholm

Particular congratulations to Barbara and Marilyn (aka Misky).

For those of you who don’t know who Robert is and why this is a rather big deal, here’s his writer’s bio: Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

2] I don’t know how many of you know Magma. They say of themselves: Like all the best poetry, Magma is always surprising. Every issue of Magma has a different editor, either members of our board or a prominent poet acting as a guest editor. It’s that fresh eye in each issue which gives Magma its unique variety. Magma publishes three times a year and, while they are UK based, they welcome all contributions (submissions). Their theme for the next issue is conversation. Visit them to see what they are about and whether you might not like to send in some poems.

3] I love this interview with poet Dana Gioia: Collaborating With Language. I found it in an issue of The Writer magazine and posted it back in 2013. I delighted in reading it again, thus decided you would too.

4] Finally, an excellent article, brought to us by Jessica Strawser, in Writer’s Digest: 5 Unexpected Lessons From Inside the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, written by Dina Nayeri.

Forgive my brevity. My computer is acting up and I want to get this posted fast. I will see you tomorrow for the week’s roundup of prompts; Tuesday for my prompt; and next Thursday for more links and such.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 05/02/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity: National Poetry Month

8:17 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to If sung by Petula Clark

Hello, all. Let’s see where we are: four days away from April 1 and the beginning  of a poem a day for many of us. For those who think we are nuts [and those participating are among them], you will have an abundance of prompts throughout the month to play with, try, stash, whatever you wish. The rest of us? Well.

1] Robert Lee Brewer is justifiably excited over what is quite a coup on his part. His Poem-a-Day, aka PAD, takes an interesting twist this year, with guest judges, one for each day of the month. If you head over to his place, you will see a list of the judges. Amazing.

2] Quickly’s will be on tap for the month with her refreshingly bracing style. I’m sending you to her pre-game pep talk.

3] NaPoWriMo is gearing up. They were on my list last year and I used some of their prompts [I had a buffet style: I picked and chose from among all the prompters]. At the moment they are counting down. Today’s post has links to some new poetry sites, one of which will provide your phone with a poem every day. I was excited until I found it’s for iPhones only. I’m excited for them. Really.

4] While the Found Poetry Review’s challenge is a closed one, there is no reason you cannot follow along and select some of their prompts to try. I shall post their prompt each day along with my response. The challenge, as I mentioned previously, is to write with Oulipian constraints and source the poems from our daily newspapers. The link takes you to this blog.

5] From Quillfyre’s comment below: This is the second year that The Poetry Superhighway plans a NaPoWriMo event. Last year I recall some great prompts from them. Here’s the link from the website, which in turn points to a FB page for posting the responses: http://poetrysuperhighway.com/psh/category/napowrimo/poetry-writing-prompts-2014/

If you know of another site participating, let me know and I will add it.

I shall see you tomorrow for the prompt roundup and then not until May for the regular blog postings, but every day for oulipo work.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 27/03/2014 in exercises, poems, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

7:45 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Bad Moon Rising by Creedence Clearwater Revival

pen-and-pencil-thHello, everyone. A week to go NaNo-ers. For the rest of you, how about a few forays?

I’d like to take a month off, okay a couple of months, and work on each of Joseph’s Renovations prompts; if you have not tried one, wander over. He is posting every day, so you have your choice of several and it doesn’t matter if you post them ‘not on the day’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is taking a different tack for a few weeks, noting: many of us won’t have time to work with prompts or on our poems, so I thought I’d offer slightly different fare for a while—some poetry-related reading and then a short hiatus in December. For starters, I’d like to share an interview that I did with the great poet Charles Simic. Visit. The interview ends with some pointers from Simic.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? These are the perfect size for busy months like December. Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us an unusual image: an old envelope. Having spent much time in my ancestors’ papers, there was much that sparked when I saw the photograph. Go on over.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, has us considering lightning. So much can be done with this, literal and metaphorical. He even provides us with a video of the Electric Light Orchestra singing Summer and Lightning. Head over to read what he says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she wants us to consider perspective. She has a couple of great shots of windows. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s weekly prompt gives us a page from the National Book Award’s novel winner to erase. If you have never tried an erasure poem, they can be addictive because of the challenge. Go on over to find out, to read the page being offered, and to wander around and see what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have keys, sleep deprivation, and change.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Hannah is back with Transforming Friday with Nature’s Wonders. She has a stunning photo and some interesting facts about China’s Red Beach. Head over to read about it. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Misky is our guide this month. She asks us to resurrect an old friend or family member from our memories, and she gives us an interesting way to go about it. Go on over and see what she wants us to do with it.

At Poets United, Verse First insists that The Work Is Not About Place. To see what they mean, visit.

Over at dVerse, Tony Maude takes us through the modern ode ala Pablo Neruda. To make our lives easier, he gives us steps to follow. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt and then, not until the following Tuesday, for a regular poetry prompt.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 22/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

8:20 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the First Edition singing Just Dropped In

pen-and-pencil-thHello, everyone. All is quiet on the NaNoWriMo front. Plenty of things for the poets, though, so head into the list. Note the new entrant.

Joseph’s Renovations prompts are fun; if you have not tried one, wander over. He is posting every day, so you have your choice of several and it doesn’t matter if you post them ‘not on the day’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work with the admonition: Just write it! If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives a mini-workshop in writing the personal narrative poem (not to be mistaken for a narrative poem). As she says of a resulting poem: It needs to approach the universal through the personal, it needs to mean more than the story it tells, and the old rule “show, don’t tell” definitely applies. Visit to see what else she says.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a black and white photograph by Degas (yes, you read that right). Go look at it.

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, offers us a variety of lasts.  Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she wants to know about our kitchen tables. Head over to see. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s weekly prompt asks: So, what does it mean to create found poetry from already-remixed art, re-working already recycled materials? Go on over to find out and to wander around and see what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have Kafkaesque experiences, class, and loss.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Fireblossom Friday gives us a chance to take out an old favourite, dust it off, and share it. Head over to read about it. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Misky is our guide this month. Everyone has a bicycle memory, right? Go on over and see what she wants us to do with it.

At Poets United Verse First gives us the ordinary. Head over.

Need to work on the tightness of your images? Over at dVerse, Gay Reiser Cannon talks to us about the American Sentence, show and tell at its best. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Mulled wine coming up.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt centred on meals; Thursday for a discussion of techniques that help narrative structure; and Friday for more of today.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all

 
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Posted by on 15/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

8:20 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Three Dog Night singing Never Been to Spain

pen-and-pencil-thHello, everyone. We’re one week into NaNoWriMo and Robert’s PAD chapbook challenge. Y’all still there? Give yourself a break and wander through these sites. Even if you don’t feel like another prompt, they’re fun to read.

Joseph’s Renovations are just my cup of tea. Not that I have had time to sit and write anything, but I have them all filed. You know that file. It’s labelled ‘Someday’.sunday whirl The prompts are fun; if you have not tried one, wander over. He is posting every day, so you have your choice of several and it doesn’t matter if you post them ‘not on the day’.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. Something I have noticed about writing to the words on the blog [rather than the list sent out early] is that where Brenda places the words often affects how I perceive them. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a guest prompter, poet Cat Doty who gives us a wonderfully fun prompt on writing a sonnet. Yes, fun and sonnet in the same sentence. I’m heading back there as soon as I finish here.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a painting by Sir Stanley Spencer. There is a lot happening in the painting. Look for stories, repeated elements, the title, or one person who catches your eye. Go look at it.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, has interesting suggestions to do with what we do, or don’t, know for sure.  Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she asks an intriguing question about colour. The photograph she gives us is black and white. Head over to see. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have self-portraits, being at peace, and guest poetry.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, herotomost invites us to paint a portrait of… him. The prompt is quite a challenge. I look forward to reading the results. Note all the forms he suggests; they open up the possibilities. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Misky is our guide this month. Head over to read what she says about bridges. The possibilities are many.

At Poets United Verse First introduces us to the fascinating photography of Carl Warner who embodies Meridel Le Sueur’s comment ‘The body becomes the landscape‘. Go on over for the links. I gave PU’s general address as the post does not seem to have a working link. You’ll need to scroll down.

Over at dVerse, you have to give this a try. Samuel Peralta introduces us to Googlisms and the way to use them in list poems. Read what has been posted so far. Great fun. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Haul out the crock pot. It’s time for hot apple cider and brandy.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a bit of narrative consciousness; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone. OCALHand_Writing

 
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Posted by on 08/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: TGIF

7:57 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the Kingston Trio singing Reuben James

pen-and-pencil-thHello, all. You’re not there, are you? I’m speaking to an empty room. All of you are writing, writing, writing, aren’t you? After all, you have energy and freshness… for now. Yes, it’s an evil grin. For those who are not part of November’s madness, here are this week’s prompts.

Look who’s back:’If you’re doing a daily writing practice, please consider these as options! They’re not going to be my usual philosophical windings, though. My process for building these is going to be soulless and mechanical’. It’s good we love the boy. With garlands and wreaths, head over to Joseph’s Renovations for the first prompt of the month.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives us a prompt that embraces the spirit of Halloween, but allows us to not do Halloween. She suggests we ‘focus on writing a poem in which we create an aura of suspense and mystery. To help with this, let’s be specific and use ekphrasis‘. Head on over to see the image and read what else she has to say.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a Max Ernst painting. People seem to be having a problem with it… low numbers. Remember the image is there to spark a poem; you do not have to write a poem that is recognisably about the image. You might write a poem about curves.

Laurie, at Poetry Jam, appeals to our desire for comfort. Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she gives us a bag full of goodies. Granted Halloween is done, go on over and enjoy the different songs she found for the occasion. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have costumes, confrontations, and childhood fears.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry invites us to ‘join in the Blog4Peace drive on Monday, 4 November‘. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Pamela Sayers talks to us about the Day of the Dead, a festival in Mexico that celebrates the dead with colour and fun. Visit to read what Pamela tells us.

At Poets United Verse First where simple notions prompt amazing poems — gives us the first traditional Halloween prompt with a direction to write about ‘ghosts, spirits and scares‘. Go on over to see what they say.

brownwood-bunny-header Miz Quickly has been playing with themes again, her blog’s not poetry [I have a strong desire for pumpkin pie]. She retires from the field for a couple of months, but invites us to rejoin her in January.

Over at dVerse, I have given you the general address, which means, your choice. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Haul out the crock pot. it’s time for hot apple cider and brandy.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our a narrative prompt; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone. OCALHand_Writing

 
11 Comments

Posted by on 01/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity

9:18 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to If You Got It sung by Gordon Lightfoot

Hi, everyone. My brain has been stalling all morning. Not on other things, just this post. I have hauled it squealing and whining and we are here.

1] The first link is to a wonderful interview with poet Dana Gioia, in The Writer. Titled ‘Collaborating With Language’, Gioia talks about his process for writing. Reading his responses to the questions put to him is like having a mini-workshop.

2] The second link, I found from poet James Brush. I was going to link to his page, when I realised that was just so you can link to where we want to end up. It seemed silly. So credit to James and here’s a direct link to The Poetry Storehouse. I’m going to use the same paragraph he chose, because it’s pretty explanatory:

The Poetry Storehouse is an effort to promote new forms and delivery methods for page-poetry by creating a repository of freely-available high-quality contemporary page-poetry for those multimedia collaborative artists who may sometimes be stymied in their work by copyright and other restrictions. Our main mission is to collect and showcase poem texts and, in some instances, audio recordings of those texts. It is our hope that those texts will serve as inspiration or raw material for other artistic creations in different media.

Go on over. You might recognise a couple of the poets who have sent in their poems. Yes, James is the grackle man, for those who were around when he published the chapbook. Here’s a link to his blog, should you want to wander around: Coyote Mercury.

3] Author Orna Ross has a post on freewriting that is worth a read: F-R-E-E Writing: Using Images to Release Your Creativity. She talks about the importance of detail through sensory imagery.

Okay, everyone, I hear the engines revving. Robert Lee Brewer’s PAD Chapbook Challenge [see guidelines] and NaNoWriMo [see my post: All Things NaNoWriMo for links] begin tomorrow. Good luck to all and I shall cheer you on from the sidelines.

I shall see you tomorrow [if you lift your pen from paper long enough] at the week’s roundup of prompts; next Tuesday for the first of our narrative prompts; and next Thursday for links.

Happy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 31/10/2013 in poetry, writing

 

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