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Poetics Serendipity

9:25 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to Neil Diamond singing Cracklin’ Rosie

Hello, everyone. I would like someone to do something about the weather, please. It is December. I don’t want my temperatures to be climbing towards the 80’s. I am somewhat mollified, for the moment, by having the first Pannetone of the season, just now. Links, you say? Let me look in the bag…:

1] The site Write to Done has an essay with an interesting thesis, summed up in its title: Why More Practice Can Make You a Worse Writer and What to Do Instead. The author, D Bnonn Tennant has written the piece for narrative fiction and non-fiction, but his theory on practice has some valuable insights for all writers.

2] Have you ever encountered a word and learned that it meant the opposite of what you remembered? If so, you may have come across a contronym. A contronym, often referred to as a Janus word or auto-antonym, is a word that evokes contradictory or reverse meanings depending on the context. These are the opening sentences to Kimberly Joki’s Grammarly post on verbs that are contronyms. Being a word stalker, I found it fascinating, and fun. to have pointed out clearly what I vaguely knew. (Grammarly)

3] Finally, something to amuse you: Word Origins in Plain Sight, words by Arika Okrent, pictures by Sean O’Neill.

I will see you Tuesday for our next image prompt and Thursday for links.

Happy writing, everyone.

P.S. There is nothing quite like having the nearby workers turn off the electricity as one pushes publish.

 
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Posted by on 10/12/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity

8:11 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to Train, Train sung by Blackfoot

Hello, all. We finally have autumn-like weather. At least we do until the afternoon when it’s still climbing into the eighties. We’re getting there. In a couple of days, NaNoWriMo starts. For new people, during November I’ll post some links more directed to the writing of prose, and the Tuesday prompts are for prose writers but easily adaptable to poetry.

1] First up, Robert Lee Brewer. There was a momentary panic amongst participants, last week, when Robert had not posted regarding his November Poem a Day Chapbook Challenge, but it’s official: Robert is providing his usual forum. Head over to read the guidelines.

2] The second find sounds interesting. Novlr describes itself as built by writers for writers, a place to safely hold your words, workable on any computer. They offer a free trial period for the whole of November. It sounds worth trying. You’ll know if you must have it or not.

3] The next is from The Writer’s Circle. They have many good things; you’ll be seeing a lot of them this month. This first offering is to remind you to relax and laugh at yourself this month: Writing a First Draft: The 8 Stages Writers Go Through. (Ignore the stuff around the poster)

4] Grammarly kindly asked whether I wanted to share Which Literary Monster Are You?  Well, of course, I do. It’s Halloween weekend coming up. Have some fun. I found the questions asked, interesting, although I’m not sure about the conclusion. When you arrive on the page, hit the Let’s Play button. (Yes, it would be better if I embedded the link — let’s not go there)

5] A last second addition. Tawnya Smith asked me to post a call for The Mayo Review. The deadline is this weekend, but you just might have something that fits.

I will see you Tuesday for a prompt; and Thursday for links.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 29/10/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity

8:12 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to Spirit in the Sky sung by Norman Greenbaum (one hit wonder)

Hail. I thought I’d try a different salutation. Fall continues to fall on most of the northern hemisphere. Some places are even rushing into winter. Me, here? Oh no. Let me dive into links before I become maudlin, again.

1] My grammar nerdly self was excited enough by the semi-colon, but this week I have the exclamation point. This punctuation mark I forbade use of, by my students, unless an actual exclamation was involved: Oh! Damn! Nuts! Look out! Aha! You get the point. If what you are writing is exclamatory, the words should tell the reader. If you have to use an exclamation point as emphasis, you haven’t chosen the right words, or the thing isn’t due a mark, at all. Check out How To Use An Exclamation Point Properly (& How Not To Use It) written by Julia McCoy, for Grammarly.

2] It’s time to check in with Poets & Writers with their Tools for Writers, where they occasionally update opportunities for submissions and jobs in the literary world. Scroll down and look to the right column when you get to the page.

3] Let’s round off with a cartoon from The Writer’s Circle’s Facebook page.

Nice and light, this week. I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt, possibly borrowed. We haven’t done one of those in a while. I’ll go  riffle through my books. And, I shall see you next Thursday for links and such.

Happy national poetry day and happy writing.

 
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Posted by on 08/10/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity

8:24 a.m. — San Antonio

listening to Phil Collins sing A Groovy Kind of Love

Good day, everyone. You say you have things to do and places to be? Let’s get started.

1] I was havering on whether to give you Robert Peake’s ‘Why Poetry Workshops Matter’. He’s a poet who writes on poetry and I love his style, but this particular article isn’t structured to easily read: no paragraphs. It seemed unlike Peake (I discovered that it’s only when clicking through to the article that the paragraphs disappear). Then, I saw a link at the bottom, The Joy of Revision. Of course, as I love the revision process, I checked. Much better.

The first article is an update of the second. The second is properly paragraphed and has additional subject matter of interest. I would add a caveat. In his suggested questions about form, there should be a why after each. Otherwise it sounds like he’s saying this is the way things should be because we’re questioning them. He’s not. In the questions about content, readers and writers should be asking why and how.

2] It’s that time again: Peter Murphy’s Winter Poetry & Prose Getaway. This one I am determined to make some day (at least, one of the several Murphy offers each year). The dates are in January which gives everyone plenty of time to save their pennies. I love this in the description:The Getaway creates an environment that encourages each writer to take creative risks. Peter begins the weekend by singing in his off-key voice which leads participants to realize that if it’s okay for Peter to risk that kind of embarrassment, they can too. Clearly, a born teacher.

For those who live in the area, don’t forget The Collingsworth Book Festival, held on October 3. Peter will be offering a free workshop from 12:301:15 p.m. in the Festival’s Poetry Tent, with the theme Seeing the Sea Anew.

3] Feeling brave? I havered on this one, as well, but when I found I differed (no, not got it wrong — there are a couple I’d argue, but that’s why I don’t do well on multiple choice tests) on a couple of answers, I decided we all needed to read: 10 Outstanding Grammar Tips for Writers: Take the Quiz. I wasn’t sure about the quiz format, either, but the tips are more effective if you have a choice already made. So, take the quiz, read the whys of the answers. If you find it helpful, follow the links to Daily Writing Tips then Grammarly to find the next groups of 10 tips. Only the first ten have the quiz. If I were to choose one to keep by, it would be Grammarly’s.

A nice, hefty bunch of things to go through. Enjoy them and I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt and Thursday next for more links.

Happy writing, all

 
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Posted by on 24/09/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity: All Things NaNoWriMo

7:33 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Lover of the Light sung by Mumford & Sons… … … okay, I’m back. I find I can’t listen and write when this comes on. In fact, I tend to dance… yes, in my chair. Don’t you dance while sitting?

Hello, everyone. Have you been looking at your calendars, or throwing tea towels over them so you can’t see the date? One more week. Time to gird those loins, haul out the ream of paper, sharpen the pencils — sounds more romantic than the tech version. We are counting down to NaNoWriMo. I say ‘we’ as I shall support you in spirit all the way through. Yup. Support.

Last year, on Poetry Tuesdays, I gave narrative prompts during November, so that NaNo-ers had exercises that contributed towards whatever they were working on. I shall do the same this year. People who are not participating can adapt all the prompts and continue posting poems.

1] The first link is to the main site of National Novel Writing Month. I’m not a participant and I loved exploring the place. Everything about it is set up to calm frantic writers, down to the colours of the pages. Go on over and look around. They even have cheerleaders. I’m not kidding. They call them pep talkers.

2] This year lulu.com is working with NaNoWriMo to help more authors than ever before realize their vision. Your heart beat faster, didn’t it? They have set up a Forum and they have an interesting offer which, as far as I can see, is free, so check them out. The offer? A free manuscript review, and a free first edition hardcover.

3] I love this next one, but it’s time sensitive: Sign-ups are through tomorrow. On her site, Judy Lee Dunn describes this event: The goal is to publish a book with “the largest number of authors of any novel ever written.” Writers who accept the assignment will contribute scenes or chapters of at least 800 words of a 50,000-word novel. GrammoWriMo is sponsored by Grammarly (and if you don’t know them, just for what they do, stroll on over) and sounds such fun. One novel, hundreds of authors, nay, thousands.

4] Consider joining NaNoWriMo’s Facebook page. I discovered during my April poetry experience that having a community to visit and talk with, or glance through, each day, is part of the fun.

5] If you really, really want to do this and absolutely cannot, for whatever reason, consider Camp NaNoWriMo. I know! They are from the same parent organisation as NaNoWriMo and hold their own event in April and again in July. Go on over to see the site.

6] For interest, amusement, things you didn’t know, visit Chuck Wendig’s 25 Things You Should Know About NaNoWriMo. Be warned: there is profanity, but I like what he has to say and how he says it, and that’s part of his voice.

That should do to get you raring at the start line. I shall see you tomorrow for this week’s line-up of prompts; next Tuesday for our image prompt; and, next Thursday for more links.

Happy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 24/10/2013 in writing

 

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