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Poetry Freeforall: Take One

first photo 3

7:51a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Firehead sung by Infinity Girl

Hello, all. It looks like a sunny day outside. My husband is at his final day of work and then he will be retired, officially. We were bemused to see a piece of paper he was handed earlier this week, titled: Separation Notice. Yikes! The state of Georgia is divorcing him. Texas, here we come.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the photograph. As with poetry, a viewer’s interpretation may not be what an artist intends. The image is titled Beyond Hope. I see almost the opposite. Check out their other prompts for the week.adele kenny

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele talks about a personal poetry pharmacy from which we can draw for our therapy poems. Poems centred around deeply felt emotions are some of the hardest to write well. But, their importance as therapy is boundless. Visit to see what she says on the topic of therapy poems.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy wants us to let a coffee shop be our poem starter. Head over to read what she says.

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us a black and white photograph by Toni Frissell. It’s one of those photographs that holds on, both while studying it and after leaving it. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole. Take a look.

Found Poetry Review The FPR is looking at propaganda posters. Beth gives us a wonderful link to a page of poster thumbnails — if you hover your cursor over a thumbnail, it will show you the text. Head over. (If you find a different prompt, Thursdays is changeover day.)

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are maps, specialty dishes, and tributes.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Susie gives us flowers. She has images and quotes to help us on our way, but the most inspirational thing in the post, for me, is when Susie says imagine surfing through velvet brilliance or the sky smelling of orchids. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us sustainability as our motif. Visit to read Susan’s quotes and a poem by Ginsberg.cooltext1387356024

Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge I have to laugh at myself. When I see this site coming up, I begin to happily anticipate what Jez has put together for one of his multi-faceted prompts (It’s okay, Jez — after a month you’ll be a regular and I won’t keep putting you to the blush). Check out the possibilities.sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with summer.

dverseOver at dVerse I chose the Open Link Night. I don’t think I have done that before, but Bjorn talks about us using images with our poems. As many of us do, I thought you might like to see what he says, but, more importantly (:-)), he gives us a fabulous link. I don’t know if you know of Wikiart, but if you head to the bar, Bjorn is waiting.

See you Tuesday for the next dream prompt; Thursday for links and such; and the following Tuesday (I hope — I’ll have our dates sussed out at some point) for the third dream prompt. Wordgathering will be dark next Friday, while my husband and I drive to Missouri.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
15 Comments

Posted by on 05/06/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall

first photo 310:03 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to the Silk Road Ensemble with Yo Yo Ma

Hello, all. Need a few prompts to take your mind off things? Here we go.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the image with its photograph of tattooed wrists, but also, the haibun opportunity at fairy tale. Check out their other prompts for the week.adele kenny

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele gives us a prompt that helps us take a memory and write that memory into a poem. Her tips and guidelines give us a process. Visit.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy asks us to try creating a new spin on the fairy tale Alice In Wonderland. There are so many possibilities. A haibun might be an interesting form to use. But, what caught and held me, for quite a while, is the image Stacy has accompanying the prompt. My inspiration would come from it. Head over to read what she says.

Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. This week’s rhyming word has intriguing possibilities. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one or two.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us a Still Life, 1907, by John Frederick Peto. I find it remarkably compelling. Consider the textures of things. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole. Take a look.

Found Poetry Review Beth has added a twist, a challenge, to her prompt. The source text concerns lithography, but she asks us to create a remix poem concerning anything other than lithography. Head over.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready. Even if you don’t wordle, it’s fun to see how she lays the words within a photograph.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are maps, picture a story, and making connections. Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Isadora tells us to get our groove on. I love her idea for freeing our minds if only for the moments between dance and paper. Head over.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us weeds as our motif. I love the quotes she gives us, almost all of which support weeds. Go on over and read.

Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge I am officially hooked on the way Jez presents his prompts.  I find myself anticipating arriving at his page to see what he has for us. You like ekphrastic? Go for it. You like  possibilities for found sources? Yep. Ideas for a theme? Sure. Check out the possibilities.sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. If you haven’t tried one yet, you should, especially if you like found poetry (but it isn’t necessary).  Head over to see what she does with mind.

dverseOver at dVerse Gabriella talks to us about the poetry of the everyday. You might want to check the prosody post, as well, even if just to read. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for our first prompt of the summer; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
8 Comments

Posted by on 29/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall — Remember

first photo 38:02 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to Seals & Crofts singing King of Nothing

Hello, all.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the image with its photograph of two red shoes, oddly compelling. Check out their other prompts for the week.adele kenny

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele has a guest prompter, this week: Me.It was odd to arrive at her site and see me. I had forgotten, briefly. At any rate, the prompt focuses on a sense of place and I talk more than usual, as I discuss what a sense of place entails. Visit.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready. They are an interesting collection, sourced from a Naomi Shihab Nye piece. Go on over.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy is giving us one of her guided prompts. I love these. Even if you are feeling at your least creative, if you follow the steps, you will have a poem. You can take it from there. Stacy is good at these, so see what she says about summer. Visit.

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us an exquisite artwork by Ulrike Bolenz. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole. Take a look.

Found Poetry Review The FPR’s focus is graduation speeches: select any current or past speech. If you are attending a graduation, jot down notes to reuse later. Beth provides several links for us to look for a source text. Head over.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are personal truths, stranded, and sunflowers.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Fireblossom talks lists. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us happiness as our motif. Visit to read the examples she has chosen, to inspire us, especially a brief video of Alfred Hitchcock defining happiness.

Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge I love the black and white photograph Jeremy has and found myself already working on one of the phrases he gives us this week. Check out the possibilities.sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with blue.

dverseOver at dVerse I have left the choice to you. When you arrive at the site, scroll down a bit and you will see the choices for the week. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for an image prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 22/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall — And, Again

first photo 37:42 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to America (to a backing chorus of the dish washer) sung by Neil Diamond

Hello, all.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is Heeding haiku with HA — the prompt involves Debussy and a piece of his music. Check out their other prompts for the week.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele has a post for the files: What Editors Look For. If publishing adele kennypoems is part of your goal it’s not a bad idea to think about what makes particular poems compelling enough to publish, she writes. I thought it might be interesting to poll some poetry journal publishers and poetry editors (print and electronic) to gather some ideas about the qualities of poetry that editors want for their journals. Not only do we hear from several editors, but we have magazines to check out.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. For her return prompt, Stacy has a photograph. I found myself staring at it for quite a while. Take a look.

 

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us a photograph. Interesting. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole.

Found Poetry Review Recovering: Stand by.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are mothers, alternate future, and made of glass.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Marian offers a musical prompt with a Seussian touch. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Sumana gives us waves as our motif. Visit to read the examples she has chosen, to inspire us.sasha

We have a new contender, Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge, on Thursdays. I have looked at several of Jeremy’s past prompts and they are fun because he gives us many possibilities. We have possible themes, poetic lines, and images. Choose one, two, or mix a bunch. He asks for both poetry and flash fiction, depending on what strikes you. Go on over and ‘meet’ him. Try a prompt.

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with philosophy.

dverseOver at dVerse Bjorn talks to us about antithesis. It’s an interesting discussion and always a fun topic to deal with in a poem. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for one of my prompts; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 15/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall — Let’s Go. You Can Do It.

first photo 3Out of my way. I’m late, I’m late, for a very important… Oh, you’re the date and I’m only a couple of hours behind: 9:45 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to They Can’t Take That Away From Me sung by Robbie Williams

Hello, all. No niceties. We’re late! We’re off!

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is Tale Weaver’s — the prompt involves documents of any sort and will work for regular and found poetry. Check out their other prompts for the week.sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stand by.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele gives us a prompt that is particularly important to what we do. This week, she asks us to deal with last lines. She has many examples (There are a couple where I’m going to seek out the poem), and the tips and dos and don’ts that make her prompts mini-workshops. Head over.

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales  Either people are slow in coming back from April, or they don’t know what to do with this photograph. Remember that you do not have to write about the whole, or write about the image directly. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, I have been denied access. If anyone knows if the site has gone private, let me know.

 

FPR-200

Found Poetry Review Recovering: Stand by.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are bard, found objects, and digital poetry. A whole little poem right there. Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads grapeling offers a word list drawn from the works of Neruda. Go play with the toads.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us honouring our elders as our motif. Visit to read the examples Susan has chosen. sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Stand by.

dverseOver at dVerse Bjorn talks to us about metaphor and cliché. The post is a week ago, but the piece is worth a read, if you haven’t done so, so head to the bar. They have Moscow Mules this week.

That should keep you busy. I shall see you Tuesday for one of my prompts; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
12 Comments

Posted by on 08/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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PoMoSco Day 30

Here we are, at last. The final day. I have loved having part of this month be posting poems I thought you’d enjoy. The final prompt asked us to: Visit your local restaurant, bar or coffee shop and snag a copy of the menu. Write a poem using only words and phrases found on the menu.

This, as with any source, depends on text to be workable. I was lucky. I chose a Japanese menu. The restaurant must make a hundred rolls and they name every single one of them. In fact, I had too many words. The first things I did was delete words I knew I wasn’t going to use, so the list was not so intimidating. I like what I finally arrived at: Life is a Japanese Menu.

Other items on the menu (I went nuts today, because it’s the final one):

Barbara C: Please ask

Richard Walker: aromas!

Massimo Soranzio: Buried within

Misky: Filling and Earl Grey at Pret

Kimmy Stühle: Angels on the Moon

Gary Glauber: The Western Chinese Amigo’s Umbrella

Zann Carter:Live–Often and Well

Andrea Janelle Dickens: Émigré Memories

Lori Brack: gypsy midnight

Okay, I’m stopping. The relatives are on their way from the airport, so I guess I should cast my eye over the flat. The dusting… ah, well. Enjoy these. I hope to, a couple of times next month, post links to some more that I come across as I go back through and read without a deadline.

I will see you Tuesday for my regular prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

 
14 Comments

Posted by on 30/04/2015 in exercises, poems, poetry, pomosco

 

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PoMoSco Day 29

I’m still alive and kicking. Okay, maybe not kicking. Today’s prompt was… interesting: Choose a source text where key terms reappear frequently throughout. Books on a particular subject (e.g., whaling, basketball, the Civil War) lend themselves easily to this prompt, as do textbooks, medical journals, etc. Fiction is harder, but you may challenge yourself!

Choose 1-5 of these recurring terms. In a source text about chess, you might choose the words “pawn” and “board.” For each word you’ve chosen, select a replacement word. In the example above, you might choose to replace “pawn” with “woman” and “board” with “home.” Substitute the replacement word(s) on your list each time the original term(s) appear(s) in the text. Create a poem, keeping editing and authorial intervention to a minimum. Got that? Here’s mine: Bookcombing Tips For Southern Florida

Other substitutions (and be sure you look to see what the source text is):

Misky: What Do Kisses Drink

james w. moore: poets of the Wolf — this one is giving me much pleasure. I left a tab open the third time I hunted it down to reread. The two items giving me much joy are picturing specific writers from the PoMoSco group as the wolves, howling, of course. Or, peopling the landscape with famous poets.

Massimo Soranzio: After

Richard Walker: the pursuit of happiness

Rebecca Siegel: On Swarming

Barbara C: Freeing the Muse

Gary Glauber: Replacing and Installing Your WF yes, it is long, but what a giggle

Nancy Chen Long: Glitter Roses Are Beautiful Moons Too

Enjoy these. I will see you tomorrow for the final poem.

 
10 Comments

Posted by on 29/04/2015 in exercises, poems, poetry, pomosco

 

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