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Poetics Serendipity

02 Oct

7:53 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Tonight’s the Kind of Night sung by Noah and the Whale

Hello, all. Time is running. One of the things I love about my Thursday posts is the reading I have to do before deciding whether you’ll enjoy, or find useful, a particular item. The reading forces me to slow down and concentrate — speeding up one’s day is addictive and needs to be fought. So, here are a few things for you to call a time out with.

1] This first is more in the nature of an announcement. Many of you have known James Brush for as many years as I have — there is a group of us who met over writing small stones some four years ago. The name Gnarled Oak is familiar to us as his place for his own small stones. Now, James has turned his hand to publication, not of his work, but ours, should we submit and be accepted. In a nod to Gnarled Oak‘s past, the first issue will start small with a micro-poetry, prose, video, art, whatever issue. Welcome the newest online journal.

2] Next up Jeffrey Levine and a preview of points four through six which he will post next week. Levine tells us, we’ll skip this week in honor of the High Holy Days, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (Happy New Year!), but he does give us the original versions of these three points and says: Next Wednesday it’s a manuscript-making throw down, in which we invoke Shelly’s Ozymandias, and explore those three points even more closely through the lens of Shiva, God of Destruction, the third god in the Hindu triumvirate, as we learn from the gods how to re-create our manuscripts by destroying. I can’t wait.

3] Hmm. I need to give you something to chew on. How about two recent articles on the latest findings about reading and writing (while the writing refers to prose, as in journaling, or narrative writing, all the points work for poetry). Since the advent of e-readers, there has been a fight between its advocates and those of reading paper books: now, science has weighed in, and the studies are on the side of paper books.

The article on writing sums up with: From long-term health improvements to short-term benefits like sleeping better, it’s official: Writers are doing something right. Even blogging might trigger dopamine release, similar to the effect from running or listening to music.

Both articles are short and easy to digest. Keep in mind these are early findings.

That’s it, a nice easy week. I shall see you tomorrow for the roundup of prompts; Tuesday for a word prompt; and next Thursday for links.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 

 
11 Comments

Posted by on 02/10/2014 in links, poetry, writing

 

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11 responses to “Poetics Serendipity

  1. rosross

    02/10/2014 at 9:06 am

    Good news about writing, I hate jogging and have never liked sport. I will walk kilometres for a reason but never just around the block. And I spend a lot of time running up and down stairs in Malawi and running after kids in Australia so I figure exercise is exercise.:)

     
    • margo roby

      02/10/2014 at 9:16 am

      I’m grinning. The line ‘I hate jogging and have never liked sport’ comes out of my mouth often. My doctor, a few years ago, told me exercise might add six months to my life. I have a genetic strain that will take care of a long life. I realise that agility is more important, but I’m still not good about exercising. I take every staircase I come across :-).

       
      • rosross

        02/10/2014 at 9:40 am

        I am firmly of the view that should’s are bad for one’s health. If you don’t enjoy doing something then it will do more harm than good. I believe that also applies to what one eats and drinks.

        I played sport as a kid but was never so good and never really liked it. I don’t mind swimming but rare to be somewhere that it is possible. Walking for hours as a tourist I don’t mind in the least if it is not too hot and like you, I am more inclined to walk up stairs and down when I can.

        I also walk very fast normally and always have done. And I don’t sit around much. Even when I work I am forever getting up and down – multi-tasking.

        And logic and common sense said to me that what matters most of all is movement and I did read something a few years ago where they decided that basic housework was as good as going to the gym three times a week.

        I always felt that statements like ‘no pain, no gain’ were not only unwise, but cruel to the body and have never believed that a massage should hurt!

        As it is, no dodgy joints at all for me, lots of energy and no problems and around me I have my sporting friends and family, aged fifty up, with bits replaced and buggered backs and knees and ankles and god knows what and so, Goddess-shaped as I am, although cuddly, nowhere near obese, I am perfectly happy with my non-exercising life!

        And I also think that sex beats conventional exercise any day.:)

         
        • margo roby

          02/10/2014 at 9:53 am

          My Lord, we’re kin: ‘I played sport as a kid but was never so good and never really liked it. I don’t mind swimming but rare to be somewhere that it is possible. Walking for hours as a tourist I don’t mind in the least if it is not too hot’ and ‘I also walk very fast normally and always have done. And I don’t sit around much. Even when I work I am forever getting up and down – multi-tasking’. Me to a t.

          Rounders… shudder. Netball… double shudder. Oddly, I didn’t mind field hockey. I wasn’t good at it, but I rather enjoyed it.

          ‘Goddess-shaped as I am, although cuddly’ — how gorgeous. I am with you on massages.

          ‘And I also think that sex beats conventional exercise any day.:).’ Yep!

          Someday, when we are 100 and still spry, we’ll have to sit on a porch together and reminisce.

           
          • rosross

            02/10/2014 at 10:06 am

            Spooky, actually I was not bad at hockey and I played it for the school and rather liked it as well. Ditto for cricket and softball. But yes, Rounders and Netball, shudder, hopeless.

            Ha, ha, we can meet half-way at 100 – maybe somewhere in Europe though.

             
  2. Hannah Gosselin

    02/10/2014 at 1:09 pm

    Hello!

    In this case, I agree with science…I love to hold my books. ♥

    And I’m not surprised about the dopamine…no wonder I keep coming back…it’s a happy chemical producing activity for sure. 🙂

    Thank you for the goodies, Margo!

     
  3. James Brush

    03/10/2014 at 7:59 am

    Thanks for sharing the notice about Gnarled Oak. I do appreciate it.

     
  4. James Brush

    03/10/2014 at 8:00 am

    Thanks for posting the notice about Gnarled Oak. I do appreciate it.

     

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