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Poetry Freeforall: The End Is Nigh

7:45 a.m. — AtlantaPaper snowflakes

listening to Tennessee Flat Top Box sung by Rosanne Cash

Hello, everyone. We begin by featuring one of our regulars. You’ve seen them, week after week, anchoring the prompts roundup: Flashy Fiction. With a new year upcoming they want to revitalise the site. Wait ’til you see its new look, warm, sleek and easy to navigate. Down the left side is their framework and archives; down the right, their featured hosts, whose names many of you will recognise. In the centre is each day’s prompt.

I am going to argue that even the poets should be over here. Whether you write flash fiction, or not, writing a short narrative is often a strategy for moving into a poem. Like all prompts, whatever you write is right, as far a the good people running the show are concerned. So, make a note and drop in on them regularly. Make them your habit. One nice feature: you can post your short bit right in the comments.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda found our words on Jeopardy. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is taking a different tack for a few weeks, noting: many of us won’t have time to work with prompts or on our poems, so I thought I’d offer slightly different fare for a while—some poetry-related reading and then a short hiatus in December.This week: Finding the Right Words by guest blogger Diane Lockward [whose book, The Crafty Poet, I happen to have sitting next to me].

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? These are the perfect size for busy months like December. Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a black and white photograph that has so many possibilities I stopped to make notes. I particularly like the reflection in the car’s window Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, asks us to wander into the realm of childhood beliefs. Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she has a photograph of part of her garden. The colours are lovely. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt, this week, asks for a found poem from Nobel texts. They give us several links. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have miscommunication, creating tension, and disappointment. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, herotomost has an interesting challenge: to find someone who doesn’t write and ask them to give you an opening line. Head over to read his idea as to why. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Yousei Hime takes over as our guide this month. Her second prompt is another type of collage, a cento. Knowing how busy we are she also provides links for material. Go on over.

At Poets United, Verse First presents us a gorgeous Elizabeth Bishop poem and asks us to follow its framework. The topic: loss, losing, art, and their meanings for you. Visit.

Over at dVerse, Gay Reiser Cannon has an interesting post on writing in one’s first language. Be sure to read the comments. They are fascinating. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Along with hot toddies, Gay has chocolate chip cookies.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a borrowed prompt and then, not again until the first week of January.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 13/12/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

1195445434563101144Machovka_Christmas2.svg.thumb7:55 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Danny’s Song sung by Loggins & Messina

Hello, everyone. Ready for a bunch of ideas? Wonder how on earth you are going to write everything you want to? The first of us to win the lottery should start a home for poets who want to write to all the prompts around. Here are this week’s.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda found our words in the CBS nightly news. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is taking a different tack for a few weeks, noting: many of us won’t have time to work with prompts or on our poems, so I thought I’d offer slightly different fare for a while—some poetry-related reading and then a short hiatus in December.This week: A Meditation on the Relationship of Love and Art by guest blogger Michael T. Young.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Her rhyme word is crab. I stopped for a while to read. Never written one? What are you waiting for? These are the perfect size for busy months like December. Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us an image that might seem to restrict the possibilities. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can just write the response the image evokes. Go on over.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, has an interesting take on gifts. She reminds us that gifts can be far more than the literal present. Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words I had to laugh as she bounced from topic to topic; be sure to read about twilight. Fascinating. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Check out the Found Poetry Review’s weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. This week has links to many goodies: an article on the archaeology of poetry; a super cool place and idea for remixing poetry; a great journal, Right Hand Pointing, to submit to; and a blog that features your found poetry. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have change, the times, and family. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Margaret gives us several very interesting and different images from photographer Jennifer MacNeill, as inspiration. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Yousei Hime takes over as our guide this month. Her first offering is a lovely idea for a Christmas gift [which can be given at any time], a Holiday Collage. Head over to read what she says.

At Poets United, Verse First presents The Owl. To help, they offer a photograph and a poem. If you want to see the poem in its proper format, visit the poemhunter.

Over at dVerse, Samuel Peralta asks us to take on the 55 words form. It’s a fun exercise. If you haven’t tried it and you haven’t met G-man (Samuel asks that we link to him, as well), visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Is that mulled wine?

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a superstitious prompt; Thursday for I’m still not sure what; and Friday for the week’s prompts roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 06/12/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity: Ho! Ho! Ho!

christmasdividercorner

7:34 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Christmas music [I warned you]

 

Hello, everyone. It’s another grey, wet day in Atlanta and the temperatures continue to climb. However I see a cold front approaching. [I like winter clothes, damn it.]

Today, I am giving you links to places with presents for writers. Many are specifically for the poets in your life — of course you are allowed to get them for yourself. Just tell someone you have something for them to give you. A couple are for writers, generally. I have been through the lists and want several things. So, spend a little time wandering. Those who don’t celebrate Christmas, well, there’s New Year’s. Start a tradition.

1] Let’s start with The Huff Post’s Blog and an article on Why You Should Buy Poetry This Holiday Season. Author Kelly Forsythe presents a good case for giving poetry: Perhaps we open our creative minds most intensely during the holidays, so, in theory, gifts which speak directly to these creative sensibilities should make it to the top of our must-have lists. Something that allows us to expand our minds just a tad further, pushing past the mundanity of office parties. Something that reminds us of the emotional connections we crave, particularly during the holidays. Enter: poetry.

Head over and read what she has to say.

2] A post titled Top Ten Gifts for the Poet has a diverse collection of suggestions. I already have the Cavallini folders marked. Don’t be fooled by what looks like the end of the article after the first suggestion. Keep going.

3] Kelli Russell Agodon, in her blog Book of Kells, has an interesting and fun Gift Guide for Poets & Writers: My Favorite Things. Who can resist Aqua Notes for the shower?!

4] One of my favourite places for gifts of any kind is Cafe Press. If you don’t know it, make sure you have plenty of time before you click the link. The writers’ gifts, at first glance, appear to be for narrative writers, but you will see quickly that many things work for poets.

5] Finally, a more personal gift. You will see this again tomorrow, but here’s an early look at We Write Poems. Their guest prompter this month is Yousei Hime who says: It is a gift giving season.  Handmade gifts are the best, and what better way to share love and self than writing.  Let us write and wrap a poem as a gift. Go on over and read her suggestion for a Holiday Collage.

I shall see you tomorrow for the week’s roundup of prompts; next Tuesday for something superstitious; and next Thursday for something.

Happy writing (and shopping), all.

 
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Posted by on 05/12/2013 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

7:45 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Bad Moon Rising by Creedence Clearwater Revival

pen-and-pencil-thHello, everyone. A week to go NaNo-ers. For the rest of you, how about a few forays?

I’d like to take a month off, okay a couple of months, and work on each of Joseph’s Renovations prompts; if you have not tried one, wander over. He is posting every day, so you have your choice of several and it doesn’t matter if you post them ‘not on the day’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is taking a different tack for a few weeks, noting: many of us won’t have time to work with prompts or on our poems, so I thought I’d offer slightly different fare for a while—some poetry-related reading and then a short hiatus in December. For starters, I’d like to share an interview that I did with the great poet Charles Simic. Visit. The interview ends with some pointers from Simic.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? These are the perfect size for busy months like December. Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us an unusual image: an old envelope. Having spent much time in my ancestors’ papers, there was much that sparked when I saw the photograph. Go on over.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, has us considering lightning. So much can be done with this, literal and metaphorical. He even provides us with a video of the Electric Light Orchestra singing Summer and Lightning. Head over to read what he says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she wants us to consider perspective. She has a couple of great shots of windows. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s weekly prompt gives us a page from the National Book Award’s novel winner to erase. If you have never tried an erasure poem, they can be addictive because of the challenge. Go on over to find out, to read the page being offered, and to wander around and see what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have keys, sleep deprivation, and change.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Hannah is back with Transforming Friday with Nature’s Wonders. She has a stunning photo and some interesting facts about China’s Red Beach. Head over to read about it. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Misky is our guide this month. She asks us to resurrect an old friend or family member from our memories, and she gives us an interesting way to go about it. Go on over and see what she wants us to do with it.

At Poets United, Verse First insists that The Work Is Not About Place. To see what they mean, visit.

Over at dVerse, Tony Maude takes us through the modern ode ala Pablo Neruda. To make our lives easier, he gives us steps to follow. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt and then, not until the following Tuesday, for a regular poetry prompt.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 22/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

8:20 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the First Edition singing Just Dropped In

pen-and-pencil-thHello, everyone. All is quiet on the NaNoWriMo front. Plenty of things for the poets, though, so head into the list. Note the new entrant.

Joseph’s Renovations prompts are fun; if you have not tried one, wander over. He is posting every day, so you have your choice of several and it doesn’t matter if you post them ‘not on the day’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work with the admonition: Just write it! If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives a mini-workshop in writing the personal narrative poem (not to be mistaken for a narrative poem). As she says of a resulting poem: It needs to approach the universal through the personal, it needs to mean more than the story it tells, and the old rule “show, don’t tell” definitely applies. Visit to see what else she says.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a black and white photograph by Degas (yes, you read that right). Go look at it.

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, offers us a variety of lasts.  Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she wants to know about our kitchen tables. Head over to see. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s weekly prompt asks: So, what does it mean to create found poetry from already-remixed art, re-working already recycled materials? Go on over to find out and to wander around and see what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have Kafkaesque experiences, class, and loss.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Fireblossom Friday gives us a chance to take out an old favourite, dust it off, and share it. Head over to read about it. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Misky is our guide this month. Everyone has a bicycle memory, right? Go on over and see what she wants us to do with it.

At Poets United Verse First gives us the ordinary. Head over.

Need to work on the tightness of your images? Over at dVerse, Gay Reiser Cannon talks to us about the American Sentence, show and tell at its best. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Mulled wine coming up.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt centred on meals; Thursday for a discussion of techniques that help narrative structure; and Friday for more of today.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all

 
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Posted by on 15/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

8:20 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Three Dog Night singing Never Been to Spain

pen-and-pencil-thHello, everyone. We’re one week into NaNoWriMo and Robert’s PAD chapbook challenge. Y’all still there? Give yourself a break and wander through these sites. Even if you don’t feel like another prompt, they’re fun to read.

Joseph’s Renovations are just my cup of tea. Not that I have had time to sit and write anything, but I have them all filed. You know that file. It’s labelled ‘Someday’.sunday whirl The prompts are fun; if you have not tried one, wander over. He is posting every day, so you have your choice of several and it doesn’t matter if you post them ‘not on the day’.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. Something I have noticed about writing to the words on the blog [rather than the list sent out early] is that where Brenda places the words often affects how I perceive them. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a guest prompter, poet Cat Doty who gives us a wonderfully fun prompt on writing a sonnet. Yes, fun and sonnet in the same sentence. I’m heading back there as soon as I finish here.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a painting by Sir Stanley Spencer. There is a lot happening in the painting. Look for stories, repeated elements, the title, or one person who catches your eye. Go look at it.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, has interesting suggestions to do with what we do, or don’t, know for sure.  Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she asks an intriguing question about colour. The photograph she gives us is black and white. Head over to see. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have self-portraits, being at peace, and guest poetry.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, herotomost invites us to paint a portrait of… him. The prompt is quite a challenge. I look forward to reading the results. Note all the forms he suggests; they open up the possibilities. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Misky is our guide this month. Head over to read what she says about bridges. The possibilities are many.

At Poets United Verse First introduces us to the fascinating photography of Carl Warner who embodies Meridel Le Sueur’s comment ‘The body becomes the landscape‘. Go on over for the links. I gave PU’s general address as the post does not seem to have a working link. You’ll need to scroll down.

Over at dVerse, you have to give this a try. Samuel Peralta introduces us to Googlisms and the way to use them in list poems. Read what has been posted so far. Great fun. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Haul out the crock pot. It’s time for hot apple cider and brandy.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a bit of narrative consciousness; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone. OCALHand_Writing

 
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Posted by on 08/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: TGIF

7:57 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the Kingston Trio singing Reuben James

pen-and-pencil-thHello, all. You’re not there, are you? I’m speaking to an empty room. All of you are writing, writing, writing, aren’t you? After all, you have energy and freshness… for now. Yes, it’s an evil grin. For those who are not part of November’s madness, here are this week’s prompts.

Look who’s back:’If you’re doing a daily writing practice, please consider these as options! They’re not going to be my usual philosophical windings, though. My process for building these is going to be soulless and mechanical’. It’s good we love the boy. With garlands and wreaths, head over to Joseph’s Renovations for the first prompt of the month.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives us a prompt that embraces the spirit of Halloween, but allows us to not do Halloween. She suggests we ‘focus on writing a poem in which we create an aura of suspense and mystery. To help with this, let’s be specific and use ekphrasis‘. Head on over to see the image and read what else she has to say.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] gives us a Max Ernst painting. People seem to be having a problem with it… low numbers. Remember the image is there to spark a poem; you do not have to write a poem that is recognisably about the image. You might write a poem about curves.

Laurie, at Poetry Jam, appeals to our desire for comfort. Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she gives us a bag full of goodies. Granted Halloween is done, go on over and enjoy the different songs she found for the occasion. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have costumes, confrontations, and childhood fears.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry invites us to ‘join in the Blog4Peace drive on Monday, 4 November‘. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Pamela Sayers talks to us about the Day of the Dead, a festival in Mexico that celebrates the dead with colour and fun. Visit to read what Pamela tells us.

At Poets United Verse First where simple notions prompt amazing poems — gives us the first traditional Halloween prompt with a direction to write about ‘ghosts, spirits and scares‘. Go on over to see what they say.

brownwood-bunny-header Miz Quickly has been playing with themes again, her blog’s not poetry [I have a strong desire for pumpkin pie]. She retires from the field for a couple of months, but invites us to rejoin her in January.

Over at dVerse, I have given you the general address, which means, your choice. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Haul out the crock pot. it’s time for hot apple cider and brandy.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our a narrative prompt; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone. OCALHand_Writing

 
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Posted by on 01/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poem for We Write Poems

11:04 a.m. — Atlanta

I have loved this month of prompts with Pamela Sayers. Her prompts are all the things I like to write about. That does not help, as you all know well, when one is in a writing funk. I was, however, determined to have a response to one of Pamela’s prompts, so, for you, Pamela:

Once a Dreamer

She never watched the clock
or snuck looks at the classroom door,

but, in her report cards
teachers said:
She looks out the window
too much, dreaming.

Still, she dreamt
and still she dreams.

 

If you have not checked in at WWP for a while, you should wander by. If you are a regular, then I shall see you over there, or cross paths while reading others’ poems.

 
21 Comments

Posted by on 26/10/2013 in poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Storing Up For the Winter

8:42 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Don McLean singing Mountains o’ Mourne

pen-and-pencil-thHello, all. Forget your families; forget your jobs; forget about eating (here’s your chance to try out the thirty new varieties of vegetable chips). Not only do we have NaNoWriMo coming down the pike, but Robert Lee Brewer’s November ‘poem-a-day towards a chapbook’ contest.  Oil those brain gears.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda selects words from Beauty Supply, by Lee Ann Brown. It’s a complex grouping and that’s what makes working them fun. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is giving us a chance to vent. She calls her topic ‘Rantables’. Head over and let her take you through the steps of having your rant and turning it into a poem.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag is on a one week break to celebrate Tess Kincaid’s birthday. Next year, I’ll try to remember to pre-post so we can join her on the 20th.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, tells us to look in a mirror. Head over to read what he says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words the photograph on Wonder Wednesday’s post, speaks to our fears. Between her own poem, her wondering and the title of the post, we are given a richness of possibilities for poems. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. We have an article of clothing, experimentation, and the art of appreciating.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

Ooh! At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry’s Challenge is about the language of flowers. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Pamela Sayers wants us to write about windows and doors. So many possibilities. Go on over to read what she says. (I have one this week, Pamela!)

At Poets United Verse First where simple notions prompt amazing poems — gives us the topic of food and writing (vegetable chips, anyone?). Visit to see what they say.

brownwood-bunny-header Miz Quickly offers two prompts a week, so I will always give you the general address. This week is a little different. We have a series of six prompts that stem from one image and that work off each other and together. It’s a heck of a lot of fun, so if you haven’t been over, go. Visit and see what it’s all about.

Over at dVerse, Tony Maude gives us the Rondeau in Form for All. There is much more to the crafting of a Rondeau than you might think and they are fun to build. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Cider on tap.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone. OCALHand_Writing

 
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Posted by on 25/10/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Turn With the Leaves

7:46 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Highwaymen singing Cotton Fields

Hello, all. Atlanta has committed to Fall. I sit with my woolies on, contemplating the when of heating.

Joseph Harker is on hiatus, for now. His space will be here when he returns.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, we have an interesting grouping of words. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has given us a format for a ten line poem. You almost lost me. I love this kind of exercise, as a way to arrive at a first draft. The point is to do exactly what the instructions say, at least for the first draft — I am always surprised where that takes me. Then, you can go nuts and play with the second draft.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt. The photograph can take you a couple of ways. Should the dog not spark anything, look closely at the planks of wood, at the grain, the texture… deal with that; or, fences…

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, is talking trash. Head over to read what she says.

This week on Carol’s Light Words the photograph on Wonder Wednesday’s post, asks an interesting question: ugly, or not? That gives us a whole new track we can wander down, besides what we see in the photo. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. We have collectibles [this goes rather nicely with this week's prompt, so visit me, too ;-)], relationships, and meals.  Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Hannah has a video to go with her natural wonder: ice. She gives us a couple of paths. I am immediately drawn to her injunction to make a cave of words — very cool. Head over to read. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems  Pamela Sayers wants us to write about food. So many possibilities. Go on over to read what she says.

At Poets United Verse First, where simple notions prompt amazing poems, gives us another prescribed prompt. It’s all about nouns and verbs, ladies and gentlemen, nouns and verbs.

brownwood-bunny-headerSpooky. I arrived at Miz Quickly’s place here, as her prompt landed in my inbox.  Miz Quickly offers two prompts a week, so I will always give you the general address. This week we have change the form, and broken things. Visit and see what it’s all about.

Over at dVerse, Pretzels & Bullfights talks about voice. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. They are beginning to crush the apples for cider.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a response poem (remember, I gave homework!); Thursday for links; and next Friday for more of today.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 18/10/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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