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Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Snow Day

9:33 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Over the Rainbow sung by Iz

Hello, everyone. Don’t laugh at poor Atlanta. Yes, my husband has his third snow day and there is no snow in sight. We are choosing to imagine the outlying towns as having problems still. I know many of you are up to your eyebrows. While you wait for the thaw, write. Be sure to check the Flash Fiction at the end. There have been changes!

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us the poet Kenneth Hart and two prompts, one that uses the last line of the Hart poem as a start point and the other, the focus of the poem, which you must visit to read.

In resonance four, Joseph takes us through the steps of a narrative poem. If you have shied away from writing one, give this a try. Don’t worry about how good it is, just follow the steps. Then you can worry it. Head over.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda took the words from a reflection piece I’m working on as part of my formal evaluation at school. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele had far too much fun making up the menu! This week involves a dinner party with a different take. Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions and tips, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara has given us a very different assignment involving sound. And, then there’s the bonus in the form of a photograph. Visit. try it.

We Write Poems  has thrown its hat into the wordle ring with We Wordle. Their wordles are different from Brenda’s so check them out. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways. I got caught by the first two in comments and stayed awhile.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a  lovely Andrew Wyeth painting, one that will resonate with many, at the moment. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, wants us to write a poem about where we are. She sets it up in a clever way. Imagine us all sitting around the world, at the same time [roughly] writing the poem… Head over.

carolOn Carol‘s Wonder Wednesday she gives us two photographs and an adage as starting points. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt asks for a remix or erasure from a fascinating source, How to Analyze People On Sight. This should provide particular fun to finding poems. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have others’ words, historical flash fiction, and invisible forces. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I was torn, but the challenge involved in Mama Zen‘s got me [and you can look at Hannah's anyway]. It is surprising how much can be said in 140 characters. Go over for a look. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Elizabeth gives us a link to a fabulous site. You could get lost for hours. Visit to see what she wants us to do with a visit to the site.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at hunger. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Samuel Peralta says goodbye. He has been a wonderful teacher. Go on over and read his goodbye post where he asks for a prose poem and gives a link for an occasional newsletter. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. The bartenders are telecommuting this week so drinks are virtual.

Flash fiction fans: There have been changes. Flashy Fiction has married up with Poetic Bloomings and can be found with a new prompt each Friday, with the last Friday being devoted to an instruction, a discussion or an exercise. This week, a photograph. Visit the newly furbished site and have a look around.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for the first in a series of prompts; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 31/01/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Write a Poem and Then Another

8:07 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Up On Cripple Creek sung by The Band

Hello, everyone. National Poetry Month is only two and a bit months away so dive in and start writing.

Donna, in her Other People’s Poetry series, gives us the poet Richard Berlin and an interesting prompt, to match the poem she chose, that asks us to Use that object as a controlling image in a poem about that person. To find out what image and what person, visit.

In resonance three, Joseph asks us to consider the interplay of colours. He gives a step by step that takes us through the setting up of the poem and throws in a challenge. Head over.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda suggests we digest the words. It’s a good strategy, allowing the words to work their way around, while they marinate. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is asking us to step out of the box in considering making a flip decision about something important. Head over to see what she says and read her suggestions and tips, of which she always has many.

At Qweekly, Barbara has given us two prompts for this week, both of which look fun, especially the other one.

We Write Poems  has thrown its hat into the wordle ring with We Wordle. Their wordles are different from Brenda’s so check them out. You can have two wordle worlds!

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for?  Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a black and white photograph Musician in the Rain by Robert Doisneau. Although it’s not meant to be, there is an element of comedy to the subject that you might allow into your poem. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, tells us to spend some time cloud watching. Okay, she doesn’t actually say that but you can. Head over.

carolOn Carol’s Wonder Wednesday she gives us two photographs to suggest connectedness. Visit to see what she says about it. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt asks for a remix from songs in the Top Forty. I took a small break that turned into a long break to start looking at lyrics. Then I was caught by a suggested article… Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have etymology, forgiveness, and protest. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, it’s Fireblossom time and she would like us to play dress-up.To read what she really wants us to do with clothes, head over. Her commentary has a ton of photos we can use, as well. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Elizabeth tells us that she came to poetry through the prophets of the Old Testament, who often spoke in metaphors and similes. Head over to see what she suggests we do.

At Poets United, Poets United Mid-Week Motif is looking at mirrors. Head over to read what Susan says about it and the poems she has for us.

Over at dVerse, Brian gives us storytelling. It’s what we do, right? Go on over and see what he says, then do as he suggests: tell a story. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Hut buttered rum on offer.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 24/01/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Here We Are Again

7:45 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Love Potion No. 9 sung by The Searchers

Hello, everyone. Welcome to all the new people who are following. We’re a friendly group so if you have questions, ask. I would also like to welcome back, for however long they are here, my two lead-offs, Donna and Joseph.

Donna of Put Words Together. Make Meaning. says of her new incarnation: Once a week, I will introduce a poem by a poet that is not considered “widely read” or with whom I have had little experience, offer some insight into what I appreciated about/learned from that particular poem, offer suggestions for further reading (both online and in book form), and perhaps even provide a writing or revision prompt based on the poem. Her first post gives us Karen Solie. What are you waiting for? Visit.

Joseph, of Naming Constellations, has returned with another R round of prompts, Resonance. We’re already at 2, so if you missed the first one, be sure to scroll down to it. He says of the new year: There’s not going to be a particular structure or theme to the prompts, and I may not always give an example poem of my own, but I’ll do my best to keep them up through the year. Those who have been with Joseph know that his prompts are  exercises in fun [okay, maybe a little hair pulling], but if followed can produce surprises. Resonance two begins with music. Head over.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda says, This week’s words came from a paper that a student wrote last week. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele asks us to consider differing perspectives or points of view, different memories of the same experience, and other situations in which “things” may be seen from two sides. To find out what she suggests we do, head over. Adele, as usual, gives many suggestions, as well as links to example poems.

Barbara is back with prompts at Qweekly, so head over and check them out. She has given us two prompts for this week, both of which look fun, especially the other one.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for?  Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie Her rhyming word choices are great for reminding us that one word can be used in many ways.

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us an incredible photograph of a lighthouse off the coast of Brittany. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Laurie, at Poetry Jam, challenges us with refrigerate/refrigerator. Head over to read what she says. Irrelevancy: I had the image she shows, of the running refrigerator, on my classroom whiteboard, for years.

carolOn Carol’s Wonder Wednesday she tells us to use her chosen images and words as a doorway. Today she gives us a photograph with a poem by Wendell Berry. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt, this week, asks for a remix from StoryCorps archives. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have empathy, listening, and emotional rescues. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Brendan’s prompt only went up Wednesday and has 29 responses so far. Clearly the prompt works well, so go see what it’s about. I will tell you that it involves a word list from a Plath poem.Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Elizabeth has us looking into the meanings of zodiac signs. Visit to find out why.

At Poets United, Verse First does not appear to be present [I'm telling you, I only turned my back for a couple of weeks], but something called Poets United Mid-Week Motif looks like it will work fine as a prompt. The motif this week is equality. Head over to read what Susan says about it.

Over at dVerse, Victoria takes on active verbs. As I am slightly passionate on the topic, I didn’t even look at other offerings, so look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Hut buttered rum on offer.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a word prompt; possibly Thursday, if anything comes to light; and Friday for the prompt roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 17/01/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: The End Is Nigh

7:45 a.m. — AtlantaPaper snowflakes

listening to Tennessee Flat Top Box sung by Rosanne Cash

Hello, everyone. We begin by featuring one of our regulars. You’ve seen them, week after week, anchoring the prompts roundup: Flashy Fiction. With a new year upcoming they want to revitalise the site. Wait ’til you see its new look, warm, sleek and easy to navigate. Down the left side is their framework and archives; down the right, their featured hosts, whose names many of you will recognise. In the centre is each day’s prompt.

I am going to argue that even the poets should be over here. Whether you write flash fiction, or not, writing a short narrative is often a strategy for moving into a poem. Like all prompts, whatever you write is right, as far a the good people running the show are concerned. So, make a note and drop in on them regularly. Make them your habit. One nice feature: you can post your short bit right in the comments.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda found our words on Jeopardy. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is taking a different tack for a few weeks, noting: many of us won’t have time to work with prompts or on our poems, so I thought I’d offer slightly different fare for a while—some poetry-related reading and then a short hiatus in December.This week: Finding the Right Words by guest blogger Diane Lockward [whose book, The Crafty Poet, I happen to have sitting next to me].

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? These are the perfect size for busy months like December. Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us a black and white photograph that has so many possibilities I stopped to make notes. I particularly like the reflection in the car’s window Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, asks us to wander into the realm of childhood beliefs. Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she has a photograph of part of her garden. The colours are lovely. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s prompt, this week, asks for a found poem from Nobel texts. They give us several links. Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have miscommunication, creating tension, and disappointment. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, herotomost has an interesting challenge: to find someone who doesn’t write and ask them to give you an opening line. Head over to read his idea as to why. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Yousei Hime takes over as our guide this month. Her second prompt is another type of collage, a cento. Knowing how busy we are she also provides links for material. Go on over.

At Poets United, Verse First presents us a gorgeous Elizabeth Bishop poem and asks us to follow its framework. The topic: loss, losing, art, and their meanings for you. Visit.

Over at dVerse, Gay Reiser Cannon has an interesting post on writing in one’s first language. Be sure to read the comments. They are fascinating. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Along with hot toddies, Gay has chocolate chip cookies.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a borrowed prompt and then, not again until the first week of January.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 13/12/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

1195445434563101144Machovka_Christmas2.svg.thumb7:55 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Danny’s Song sung by Loggins & Messina

Hello, everyone. Ready for a bunch of ideas? Wonder how on earth you are going to write everything you want to? The first of us to win the lottery should start a home for poets who want to write to all the prompts around. Here are this week’s.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda found our words in the CBS nightly news. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is taking a different tack for a few weeks, noting: many of us won’t have time to work with prompts or on our poems, so I thought I’d offer slightly different fare for a while—some poetry-related reading and then a short hiatus in December.This week: A Meditation on the Relationship of Love and Art by guest blogger Michael T. Young.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Her rhyme word is crab. I stopped for a while to read. Never written one? What are you waiting for? These are the perfect size for busy months like December. Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us an image that might seem to restrict the possibilities. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can just write the response the image evokes. Go on over.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, has an interesting take on gifts. She reminds us that gifts can be far more than the literal present. Head over to read what she says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words I had to laugh as she bounced from topic to topic; be sure to read about twilight. Fascinating. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

Check out the Found Poetry Review’s weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. This week has links to many goodies: an article on the archaeology of poetry; a super cool place and idea for remixing poetry; a great journal, Right Hand Pointing, to submit to; and a blog that features your found poetry. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have change, the times, and family. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Margaret gives us several very interesting and different images from photographer Jennifer MacNeill, as inspiration. Go play with the toads.

At We Write Poems Yousei Hime takes over as our guide this month. Her first offering is a lovely idea for a Christmas gift [which can be given at any time], a Holiday Collage. Head over to read what she says.

At Poets United, Verse First presents The Owl. To help, they offer a photograph and a poem. If you want to see the poem in its proper format, visit the poemhunter.

Over at dVerse, Samuel Peralta asks us to take on the 55 words form. It’s a fun exercise. If you haven’t tried it and you haven’t met G-man (Samuel asks that we link to him, as well), visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Is that mulled wine?

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for a superstitious prompt; Thursday for I’m still not sure what; and Friday for the week’s prompts roundup.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 06/12/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetics Serendipity: Ho! Ho! Ho!

christmasdividercorner

7:34 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Christmas music [I warned you]

 

Hello, everyone. It’s another grey, wet day in Atlanta and the temperatures continue to climb. However I see a cold front approaching. [I like winter clothes, damn it.]

Today, I am giving you links to places with presents for writers. Many are specifically for the poets in your life — of course you are allowed to get them for yourself. Just tell someone you have something for them to give you. A couple are for writers, generally. I have been through the lists and want several things. So, spend a little time wandering. Those who don’t celebrate Christmas, well, there’s New Year’s. Start a tradition.

1] Let’s start with The Huff Post’s Blog and an article on Why You Should Buy Poetry This Holiday Season. Author Kelly Forsythe presents a good case for giving poetry: Perhaps we open our creative minds most intensely during the holidays, so, in theory, gifts which speak directly to these creative sensibilities should make it to the top of our must-have lists. Something that allows us to expand our minds just a tad further, pushing past the mundanity of office parties. Something that reminds us of the emotional connections we crave, particularly during the holidays. Enter: poetry.

Head over and read what she has to say.

2] A post titled Top Ten Gifts for the Poet has a diverse collection of suggestions. I already have the Cavallini folders marked. Don’t be fooled by what looks like the end of the article after the first suggestion. Keep going.

3] Kelli Russell Agodon, in her blog Book of Kells, has an interesting and fun Gift Guide for Poets & Writers: My Favorite Things. Who can resist Aqua Notes for the shower?!

4] One of my favourite places for gifts of any kind is Cafe Press. If you don’t know it, make sure you have plenty of time before you click the link. The writers’ gifts, at first glance, appear to be for narrative writers, but you will see quickly that many things work for poets.

5] Finally, a more personal gift. You will see this again tomorrow, but here’s an early look at We Write Poems. Their guest prompter this month is Yousei Hime who says: It is a gift giving season.  Handmade gifts are the best, and what better way to share love and self than writing.  Let us write and wrap a poem as a gift. Go on over and read her suggestion for a Holiday Collage.

I shall see you tomorrow for the week’s roundup of prompts; next Tuesday for something superstitious; and next Thursday for something.

Happy writing (and shopping), all.

 
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Posted by on 05/12/2013 in links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall

7:45 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Bad Moon Rising by Creedence Clearwater Revival

pen-and-pencil-thHello, everyone. A week to go NaNo-ers. For the rest of you, how about a few forays?

I’d like to take a month off, okay a couple of months, and work on each of Joseph’s Renovations prompts; if you have not tried one, wander over. He is posting every day, so you have your choice of several and it doesn’t matter if you post them ‘not on the day’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda gives us her usual selection of words that work. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele is taking a different tack for a few weeks, noting: many of us won’t have time to work with prompts or on our poems, so I thought I’d offer slightly different fare for a while—some poetry-related reading and then a short hiatus in December. For starters, I’d like to share an interview that I did with the great poet Charles Simic. Visit. The interview ends with some pointers from Simic.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Never written one? What are you waiting for? These are the perfect size for busy months like December. Laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for this week’s line.magpie

The Mag [Magpie Tales] has given us an unusual image: an old envelope. Having spent much time in my ancestors’ papers, there was much that sparked when I saw the photograph. Go on over.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, has us considering lightning. So much can be done with this, literal and metaphorical. He even provides us with a video of the Electric Light Orchestra singing Summer and Lightning. Head over to read what he says.

carolThis week on Carol’s Light Words she wants us to consider perspective. She has a couple of great shots of windows. Also, Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

The Found Poetry Review’s weekly prompt gives us a page from the National Book Award’s novel winner to erase. If you have never tried an erasure poem, they can be addictive because of the challenge. Go on over to find out, to read the page being offered, and to wander around and see what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers’ suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have keys, sleep deprivation, and change.  Visit. (NaNo-ers, their fiction suggestions are a wonderful resource for ideas)

At imaginary garden with real toads, Hannah is back with Transforming Friday with Nature’s Wonders. She has a stunning photo and some interesting facts about China’s Red Beach. Head over to read about it. Go play with the toads.

At  We Write Poems Misky is our guide this month. She asks us to resurrect an old friend or family member from our memories, and she gives us an interesting way to go about it. Go on over and see what she wants us to do with it.

At Poets United, Verse First insists that The Work Is Not About Place. To see what they mean, visit.

Over at dVerse, Tony Maude takes us through the modern ode ala Pablo Neruda. To make our lives easier, he gives us steps to follow. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt and then, not until the following Tuesday, for a regular poetry prompt.OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, all.

 
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Posted by on 22/11/2013 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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