RSS

Tag Archives: reverie

Good Friday Freeforall

9:02 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, everyone. How nice to have a holiday. I had a bit of a lie-in and have now had my first coffee, so let’s get to it and see what we have to help you with your poems-a-day.

A couple of small announcements. Stop by Kelli Agodon’s blog for a list of all those participating in the Poetry Giveaway. She has the links in a column to the left as you arrive at her site.

Poets & Writers suggests a rather nice thing to do for National Poetry Month, which is to memorise one poem a week. There is something special, a bond that arises with a poem memorised, so consider four poems to bond with.

Don’t forget you have homework, so to speak, for my prompt next Tuesday.

Alright, we start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she gives us a wonderful poem by Adrienne Rich and a prompt based on the structure of Rich’s poem.

Joseph Harker gives us Reverie Thirteen: Turning the Hourglass, which starts with three freewrites which might provide us with material for more than just this particular prompt. I must make time to get to that today. Must. Go on over to read the whole.

Over at Adele’s, The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog gives us something a little different for the month: ‘I offer you an inspiration word or phrase and a related poem for each of April’s thirty days. You may wish to read, write, or do both. Keep in mind that writing a poem a day doesn’t mean that you have to “finish” each poem immediately. You can write a draft each day and set your drafts aside to work on later‘. Adele has the entire month listed and waiting. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are asked to, Head for the nearest telephone booth, don your cape, and meet us here. To find out more and to read our hosts’ tongue in cheek poems, head over. Marie Elena and Walt also offer a post on the tanka form.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us the words are from Richard Walker, who gives us a set of words with multiple meanings. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. I had fun considering the words in all their incarnations and Richard has two poems, one of which uses both meanings of each word.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the title of a Beach Boys’ song and a link to watch a video performance. I am so back in my music era. While the song is not one of their best, there is nothing quite like this group’s sound, and, of course, the occasionally screaming girls. Hmm. The link lets us listen to a few songs. Well, yay!

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph which continues the vein of surrealist images in which Magpie has been indulging. This one makes me laugh each time I look at it, although it’s not a humourous image, per se. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. She wants us to think about the topic of tools. Go on over to see what else she says. The possibilities might include using a tool group metaphorically.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. The introduction introduces us to contributor Gattina, but go for the cartoon. I’m chortling [yep, chortling] thinking about it.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are growl, hype, and justify. Interesting. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have The Sunday Challenge with the work of Laura Hegfield. Visit to meet her and her work. We also have Kerry’s Wednesday Challenge ~ The Oral Tradition and an intriguing prompt that suggests we Imagine it is a poem to be told to an audience seated close to the knee of the storyteller. Visit to read the prompt. Check the rest of the week too. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems starts with, Something simple, something light? Just right for April. Visit to see what it’s about. Also, WWP is one of the sites offering a place to post your poems for the month.

At Poets United, we are asked to think about escape, a topic that offers so many possibilities that one way I would approach this would be to list all the possible types of escape and then jot notes next to each… For the rest of the prompt, and some lovely images, head over. For something interesting, check the etymology of escape [my reaction was, Well, I'll be damned.]

Over at dVerse’s Form For All, we are introduced to linked quatrains and to the Rubaiyat quatrains and offered a chance to try both. Quatrains are useful to have around as stock, so give this a try. As always, explore the pub while you are there. They offer so much on their menu.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options.  Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

The final posting is for Trifecta, I have given you the link to the Instructions page. They have an interesting shtick. Visit and find out what.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt based on your having done some prep work; on Thursday I shall see you for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone. Those who have a three-day weekend, enjoy.

 
13 Comments

Posted by on 06/04/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s Fridaaaaay and That Makes This a Freeforall

8:04 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. How are you? Shall we get to it? First though, a moment or two to think about Adrienne Rich who has died. For you readers who do not know her work, do a little Googling today, and those of us who do know her work, well we might do the same.

I need to make a correction to an announcement. I had the wrong Trifecta. I know. Thank goodness, Paula checked the site, probably puzzled when I said it’s a busy looking site. You will see why when you visit, but first:

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she introduces us, this week, to Patrick Rosal. She says: [His] poems are full of music, visceral and tender at the same time. I am realising that Donna’s ‘prompt’ posts are of such value because of the poets she chooses. Many are writers I have not read, but Donna picking them gives me a first taste and I know whether I want the whole cake. Head over to meet this week’s poet. I have one of last week’s books winging its way towards me.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries, is even more fun than it usually is, asking us to write on the ephemerality of something not thought of as ephemeral, writing the poem on something like a paper napkin, book of matches, postcard… then posting the poem somewhere in our worlds, taking a photograph of it in place and posting the photo on our blogs. I felt exhilarated carrying this Reverie out and heard the same excitement in others who did this. Remember that it’s never too late to do this exercise. Go on over to read the whole.

9:11 a.m. — This is what happens when I get distracted while visiting the sites I write about here: I stopped by Joseph’s and while scrolling down to the Reverie link, spotted his ‘Fairy Tale,’ which I have been meaning to comment on. Oh well, a quick minute… the phone rings. My son for our weekly chat. I wander back to the computer, finish the remark and look to see what else I need to do… Oh, Good God, I’m writing a blog post.

And, then there is Adele’s blog, where I get caught up in both the prompts and the comments. One of the lovely things about Adele’s blog is the links to specific poems, that she suggests, that connect to the prompt either as context, or example. The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several options revolving around stones. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are challenged with a photograph. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over. I have read several lovely responses to this photograph, already. Also, this fortnight’s interview is with mike Maher., so stop and read.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us she pulled the words from an article in Bon Appetit magazine. I’ll have to reread my copy. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. Not such an easy grouping this week.

Carry On Tuesday gives us a quotation from Robert Browning. To read it and several other quotations from Browning, head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph and a strange one. The effect is weird. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Peggy, this week. She wants us to put yourself in the place of someone whose concept of God and/or how the world works is different from yours. Go on over to see what else she says. The possibilities are endless and fascinating for this topic.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. The introduction made me laugh.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are fragrant, jostle, and remnant. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have Ella, who discusses a fascinating strategy for writing poems. She also talks about yet another book I must have. Head to the Garden to find out what. We also have Fireblossom Friday and a series of fascinating photographs centering on bodies. Visit to read the prompt. Check the rest of the week too. They have a lot going on, including an interview with Hedgewitch. Go play with the toads.

Happy Anniversary, We Write Poems and thank you for all the pleasure you give us. If you haven’t checked out the WWP tribute to its followers, go look.This week we are asked to give back, by sending a prompt we think will be fun for the group to play with in the months ahead.

At Poets United, we are asked to think about music, a topic that could take weeks, months, and we would still be conversing. For the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Meeting the Bar, their prompt says, Let’s take the challenge to be totally alive in the present and write to our perceptions. It says a lot more and for that you will need to visit. You will find, as you read the article a familiar theme, one which bears repetition.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual options. Sometimes I feel the need to share one of the options: boomers/mountain beavers. You know you want to find out. Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

Flash fiction fans: I love the photograph Hannah is offering us over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem. Hannah is good at that!

The final posting is for Trifecta, the correct Trifecta. I have given you the link to the Instructions page. They have an interesting shtick. Visit and find out what.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

Remember to throw your name in for the chance at a couple of free books of poetry for the Great Poetry Giveaway. I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt that should offer everyone’s particular favourite aspect [What? In one exercise? MUAHAHAHA] and I shall set some prep work for the following week. On Thursday I shall see you for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.Gird your loins: Poem a Day is almost upon you.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 30/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Post Poems Publicly: National Poetry Month is Coming

That is to say, even more publicly than on a blog.

Hello. An extra posting, as I answer Joseph Harker’s Reverie #12 which gives the following instructions: Write a poem, necessarily short-ish, on the topic of the ephemerality of things we don’t normally think of as ephemeral; write the poem on something ephemeral, such as a paper napkin, a playing card, a postcard…; place your poem somewhere in the world; photograph it and post the photograph on your blog. I think that’s all, but visit Joseph’s blog naming constellations to read the prompt in its entirety.

I have just returned from placing mine and I had more darned fun — no, I don’t get out much. The weather is gorgeous, the perfect temperature for walking; I armed myself with tape and a stapler, not having any idea what I would stray across. I have two poems, each of which I wrote on a postcard — my handwriting, oh woe. It has not changed since sixth grade.

 

 

I decided to walk down to our local Starbucks and see if there were someplace, and maybe have a cup of coffee. They had a great bulletin board with strong magnets, so up the poem went. When I bought my coffee, white chocolate mocha, the cashier asked what I was up to, so I told him what we were doing. He paused, cogitated and asked: ‘So, can I do that? Post a poem? I like poetry’. I thought: Yes! Joseph, I figure that’s a poem found because of modeling good practice :-)

 

 

 

I continued wending my way towards Publix to pick up a loaf of bread, having been charmed by ViV’s poem amongst the bananas. On my way I saw some large stone pots filled with flowers. My second poem now resides there.

Clicking on the photos will bring them to a readable size.

We should agree to do this every now and then. Leaving poems around is a high. If you have not done this prompt yet, go! What’s that? I get out once a week to pick up groceries.

See you tomorrow everyone.

 
23 Comments

Posted by on 28/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Prompts Rounded Up: Friday Freeforall

7:25 a.m. — Atlanta

Weekend! Well, almost and some of you are about fourteen hours closer. Yesterday, I saw the list of countries where you all live. I’m not sure why I was startled at the spread, but I like knowing the part of the earth everyone inhabits. Wordgathering has gathered several new readers recently; I’d like to extend a welcome and hope to hear your voices joining in.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she introduces us to Jack Gilbert and his poem ‘The Forgotten Dialect of the Heart’. She describes reading his poetry as, A feeling in the pit of the stomach, in the well of the throat, your whole body on the edge of something, not knowing whether it is about to fall or fly. I feel this way every time I read Jack Gilbert’s poetry. I read the poem and ordered his book. Go read. The prompts are fun, too.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries, titled ‘not enough time,’ says: What we’re going to do is akin to connect-the-dots: describe that significant event without describing it outright. The exercise is intriguing, as we are asked to focus on the insignificant as the significant event of the moment while it happens, while the significant fades into the background. Go on over to read the whole.

One of the lovely things about Adele’s blog is the links to specific poems, that she suggests, that connect to the prompt either as context, or example. The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several options revolving around our various ancestries, our different nationalities, our people – our “roots”. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are challenged to Write a “new” poem. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over. You don’t want to miss the contrast of Marie’s bunny poem and Walt’s ode :-) Also, this fortnight’s interview is with Janet Martin, so stop and read. In an embarrassment of riches, we also have a new form to play with, the Parallelogram de Crystalline. Yes, quite a mouthful, but a new form to play [new to me] with is always exciting.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us she pulled the words from the Montana Forensics Educator’s Association Committee Proposals — poems can be found anywhere! Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the first few words of Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem ‘My Shadow’. To read the line and for a link to read the poem, head over. Anything by Stevenson catapults me into my childhood.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

 

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph which made me think of a Charlie Chaplin movie.  The close-up is fascinating. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. She wants us to think about connections. If you think about it, we live the word in all its forms. Even to breathe is to connect to oxygen. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. If you don’t usually visit, go to see the lovely illustration of Joy.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are amateur, diligent, and nurture. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have Mary, who suggests we Think about some of the ordinary tasks, items, aspects, annoyances, joys of our lives. Head to the Garden to find out what to do with your thoughts. We also have Kenia’s Wednesday Challenge which introduces us to Manoel de Barros, a 94-year-old contemporary Brazilian poet. Go. Read his poetry. I am enchanted. Another poet I must have in my collection. So many, so many…  Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems asks us to write a fairy tale poem. Head on over to read the rest of the prompt, because, you know there is a rest of the prompt at WWP.

At Poets United, we are asked what we think of when we hear the word light. For some cool photographs and the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Poetics, their prompt goes hand in hand with We Write Poems. Visit to read the article and a chance to write, or rewrite, a fairy tale.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options. Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. I love the photograph Hannah is offering us over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

Enough? If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt (and prep work for the following week — this time you will get it); Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone. If I haven’t mentioned it in a while, I appreciate your visits and love ‘chatting’ with you when you do.

 

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 23/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Response to Reverie Eight: a cast of thousands

Yes, it’s me again. One foot out the door and flinging words together.This is in response to Joseph Harker’s Reverie Eight: a cast of thousands. Stop by to read what is there, or to try the prompt yourself.

This is me, putting my money where my mouth is. I seem to remember, lo, these many weeks past, that I was pushing putting up for scrutiny anything we had arrived at, in response to Joseph’s prompts, no matter how rough and drafty we thought it. Here I go. Having been born to revise, I changed the order of some lines and substituted ‘crosshatching’ for ‘crisscrossing’ as I typed.

I’m answering the nature part of the prompt [no trees in the coffee shop.]. The red tree is very much how I see my mother. As soon as I saw it, I linked the two, but haven’t decided, yet, on structure for the poem.

pulled for revision

Anything that strikes you, do say. Inspiration, or the next nudge, comes from everywhere.

Now, I’m gone. Really.

 
19 Comments

Posted by on 02/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , ,

Response to Wordle 45

Hello! Happy Sunday. I have my response to the Wordle words from Brenda over at The Sunday Whirl.

How many memories can she cement
into the circuitous windings and back-
trackings of her brain

with its corrugated pelt, its ridges
and folds and lobes, its soft grey
sponginess, its thick

cumbersome workings, dense
with nerves and neurons, its
mazy meanderings?

How many memories can she cement
before the map becomes increasingly
difficult to follow

as senses shout and murmur, emotions
stray, and reluctant memory is slow
to answer, before

she stands entranced at doors of smoke-
fogged rooms, fire licking at the foot
of memory?

No title yet, possibly because I feel as if I have two different poems going. I like the first three stanzas, but not particularly the last three. I feel as if I am hearkening back to my more self-indulgent days. Therefore, please, if you have any suggestions, or even: This doesn’t work, but I’m not sure whys,  fire away. I would like this one to work.

The first three stanzas came together once I started the roll. Once I stopped, I still had a bunch of words to include, thus the last three stanzas. The whole being focused on memory is because my head is over at Joseph’s Reverie, which I am still working with.

Meanwhile I am heading to The Sunday Whirl to read what others have come up with.

 
54 Comments

Posted by on 26/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , ,

Blood Will have Blood: Response to Reverie Six

Hello again. If this is the first post you see from me today, my regular posting is a couple of hours earlier, with attendant prompt.

I am posting in response to Joseph Harker’s ‘bloody Vikings‘ exercise. And, he’s not kidding: there are body parts and blood all over our part of the cybersphere. The least frightening part of his instructions says: You should be able to read your poem aloud and feel the music of waves crashing on rocky shorelines, storms overhead and a roar building in your throat. That’s the goal, at least.

Process: I think if I had to write the first one from scratch, you would not be hearing from me. I went back through drafts and found one whose topic seemed to suit this form. Then, upon advice, I went for the alliterations. I tried, gamely to keep syllables roughly within bounds, have what I think are caesuras, and have lifts [although not necessarily where they should be].

What I know is that now I can try one from scratch. And I shall be able, maybe, to include the all-important kennings.

 

The Changing of the Guard: Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

On a grey ghost day || a gull flown day,
crowds wait, stand silent || the only sound stillness.
Black birds fly over || wheel back in formation
for soldiers unknown || to stillness surrendered.

 

Yes, I do encourage everyone to throw themselves into the exercise[s] [all of them]. I am learning so much about writing, just from my attempts. Read the whole and do what you can. We will be all over the place in our abilities to do the exercise, but it will be great to see how we each do.

 
22 Comments

Posted by on 14/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , ,

Of Reveries and Wordles

Happy Sunday, everyone. Hey. I gave you a day off, and I’ll post two poems in one so you have another day off tomorrow.

The first poem is a response to Brenda’s Wordle #42 and a response to Joseph Harker’s Reverie #5. No title as yet.

Another staccato rebellion,
abrupt — she cries for dubious
reasons — disconnected — ones
he can’t always figure out –
detached — breaks in an other-
wise peaceful marriage.

Long ago, he learned not to meddle
with the rhythm of her turmoils, to measure
the value of their love in her laughter.

When her angry, petulant face sends him
to the exile of his workroom, he sits
a while and contemplates the scar tissue
he has built up. Billows of metallic bile
dart into his mouth, as he puts the latch
to his thoughts and walks back out to stamp
on the fuses, to hug the ruins away.

Notes: It was the definitions of staccato that gave me the idea and, once started, the poem came fairly quickly. I had been working on another poem [see below] for Reverie #5, a silly one, because I wasn’t sure I could write a serious one that encompassed all the phonetic sounds, not in one week. Because I had been working on it, my brain must have been more open to hearing phonetic sounds and I noticed that the wordle poem had all the sounds but six. I tweaked.

I have all the sounds [I think] except ‘dark’ l, [x], and a glottal stop.

2nd poem in response to Reverie #5:

Ur-phonetics

It’s a riddle. An enigma. An engma –

Uh-oh.

Engma provokes a squiggly red line.
The computer dictionary suggests enema
engram engage England engrave encamp
enchant encomium, is not happy with engma.

Engmas not allowed, not aloud. Maybe,

if I tap dance: I got rhythm, I got music,
I got… toe heel shuffle tap… a little bob
and weave,  a little Muhammad Ali,
float like a butterfly…

Red line still there.

Engmas must be hidden treasure
waiting for an Open Sesame.
Joseph would not lead us astray.

You, me, let’s have a think and,
after toiling and venting, the good
Lord willing, meet back here.

Zany, huh?

 

Notes: I think I have all sounds except [x], and I had that, but didn’t like the word in this poem, even if the poem is a silly one. I had fun with this and that helped me get over fear of phonetics.

During the week, visit both The Sunday Whirl and naming constellations ‘Reveries’ to read other’s poems. With these sites, people tend to drop off poetry all week.

Happy writing.

 

 
40 Comments

Posted by on 05/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Dismantling: A Response to reverie #4

Hello again. You’ll see a lot of me, between today and tomorrow, but I have a response to Joseph Harker’s Reverie #4, which you can find on naming constellations — the prompt, not my response. Joseph asks us to approach the writing of a poem with a specific strategy: to go from seed, to trunk, to branches.

It makes sense to me to show you part of the process, rather than the end result and a ‘how I did this,’ as I usually do.

Branch:    she gropes in the dark

Trunk:        images form and fade, names dissolve

Seed words:     blurred sight and brittle bones slow her down

Trunk:        she sits, eyes unfocused, brain scurrying

Branch:    life dismantling

I wrote one or two drafts, which I will not take you through, and then the draft where I am now. In the earlier drafts I narrowed the poem’s focus down to one aspect of aging, the gradually shifting memory. After the central portion above, I wrote the stanza which follows and then the stanza which comes first. Then I separated out the single lines.

pulled for revision

I like where this is going. I am working on a series of poems on my mother, so will appreciate any comments and suggestions. If something doesn’t work for you, let me know. If you think of a word, or anything really, please say. I won’t post a changed draft because of the whole submission thing, but will appreciate any input. Do I need to make her more obviously an older person?

Did you notice that my original seeds aren’t in the draft?

Be sure to visit naming constellationsReverie to read the other responses.

If you are wandering through my blog late in the day, go back a few hours and catch the interview with James Brush.

See you tomorrow, everyone.

 
19 Comments

Posted by on 02/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Symbolic Frolic — ‘Reverie’ #3 Response

Hello. An early posting to respond to Joseph Harker’s ‘Reverie’ exercise/prompt #3: Symbolic Frolic, over on naming constellations.

I am going to write process first, and probably shall for most of the ‘Reverie’ responses. Joseph asks us to explore symbols, to go beyond the trite and create something fresh.

I found my biggest problem, other than coming up with symbols, was figuring out whether I had a symbol, or an extended metaphor. Was I comparing two unlike things, or was what I picked representing something? I’m still not sure, possibly because I chose something that might work as both [and isn't all that unlike now that I am writing this. Sigh.]

I began with three possible themes [all of which tie together...I'm thinking another poem...], jotting brief associations for each; settled on one theme and wrote more notes. I listed the trite associations, the generalizations I wanted to avoid. I picked the symbol I wanted to work with and went with one rather than two or three [keeping in mind the other poem I am now working on].

The poem itself was not a problem, but I now think I have a simile in disguise.

Pieces

Something had knocked
the jigsaw to the floor: pieces
scattered.

Long ago she lost the picture,
learned how the pieces fit, by trial…
error.

She spent a lifetime
putting the pieces together
painstakingly.

Now, as she picks up the pieces,
they no longer fit her puzzle, no longer
belong.

I hope you all are working on this. I want to see what others have come up with. I only see ViV, so far! Happy writing…

 

 
32 Comments

Posted by on 23/01/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , ,

  • creative commons license

  •  
    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 876 other followers