RSS

Tag Archives: Poetry Mixtape

Good Friday Freeforall

9:02 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, everyone. How nice to have a holiday. I had a bit of a lie-in and have now had my first coffee, so let’s get to it and see what we have to help you with your poems-a-day.

A couple of small announcements. Stop by Kelli Agodon’s blog for a list of all those participating in the Poetry Giveaway. She has the links in a column to the left as you arrive at her site.

Poets & Writers suggests a rather nice thing to do for National Poetry Month, which is to memorise one poem a week. There is something special, a bond that arises with a poem memorised, so consider four poems to bond with.

Don’t forget you have homework, so to speak, for my prompt next Tuesday.

Alright, we start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she gives us a wonderful poem by Adrienne Rich and a prompt based on the structure of Rich’s poem.

Joseph Harker gives us Reverie Thirteen: Turning the Hourglass, which starts with three freewrites which might provide us with material for more than just this particular prompt. I must make time to get to that today. Must. Go on over to read the whole.

Over at Adele’s, The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog gives us something a little different for the month: ‘I offer you an inspiration word or phrase and a related poem for each of April’s thirty days. You may wish to read, write, or do both. Keep in mind that writing a poem a day doesn’t mean that you have to “finish” each poem immediately. You can write a draft each day and set your drafts aside to work on later‘. Adele has the entire month listed and waiting. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are asked to, Head for the nearest telephone booth, don your cape, and meet us here. To find out more and to read our hosts’ tongue in cheek poems, head over. Marie Elena and Walt also offer a post on the tanka form.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us the words are from Richard Walker, who gives us a set of words with multiple meanings. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. I had fun considering the words in all their incarnations and Richard has two poems, one of which uses both meanings of each word.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the title of a Beach Boys’ song and a link to watch a video performance. I am so back in my music era. While the song is not one of their best, there is nothing quite like this group’s sound, and, of course, the occasionally screaming girls. Hmm. The link lets us listen to a few songs. Well, yay!

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph which continues the vein of surrealist images in which Magpie has been indulging. This one makes me laugh each time I look at it, although it’s not a humourous image, per se. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. She wants us to think about the topic of tools. Go on over to see what else she says. The possibilities might include using a tool group metaphorically.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. The introduction introduces us to contributor Gattina, but go for the cartoon. I’m chortling [yep, chortling] thinking about it.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are growl, hype, and justify. Interesting. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have The Sunday Challenge with the work of Laura Hegfield. Visit to meet her and her work. We also have Kerry’s Wednesday Challenge ~ The Oral Tradition and an intriguing prompt that suggests we Imagine it is a poem to be told to an audience seated close to the knee of the storyteller. Visit to read the prompt. Check the rest of the week too. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems starts with, Something simple, something light? Just right for April. Visit to see what it’s about. Also, WWP is one of the sites offering a place to post your poems for the month.

At Poets United, we are asked to think about escape, a topic that offers so many possibilities that one way I would approach this would be to list all the possible types of escape and then jot notes next to each… For the rest of the prompt, and some lovely images, head over. For something interesting, check the etymology of escape [my reaction was, Well, I'll be damned.]

Over at dVerse’s Form For All, we are introduced to linked quatrains and to the Rubaiyat quatrains and offered a chance to try both. Quatrains are useful to have around as stock, so give this a try. As always, explore the pub while you are there. They offer so much on their menu.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options.  Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

The final posting is for Trifecta, I have given you the link to the Instructions page. They have an interesting shtick. Visit and find out what.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt based on your having done some prep work; on Thursday I shall see you for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone. Those who have a three-day weekend, enjoy.

 
13 Comments

Posted by on 06/04/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s Fridaaaaay and That Makes This a Freeforall

8:04 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. How are you? Shall we get to it? First though, a moment or two to think about Adrienne Rich who has died. For you readers who do not know her work, do a little Googling today, and those of us who do know her work, well we might do the same.

I need to make a correction to an announcement. I had the wrong Trifecta. I know. Thank goodness, Paula checked the site, probably puzzled when I said it’s a busy looking site. You will see why when you visit, but first:

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she introduces us, this week, to Patrick Rosal. She says: [His] poems are full of music, visceral and tender at the same time. I am realising that Donna’s ‘prompt’ posts are of such value because of the poets she chooses. Many are writers I have not read, but Donna picking them gives me a first taste and I know whether I want the whole cake. Head over to meet this week’s poet. I have one of last week’s books winging its way towards me.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries, is even more fun than it usually is, asking us to write on the ephemerality of something not thought of as ephemeral, writing the poem on something like a paper napkin, book of matches, postcard… then posting the poem somewhere in our worlds, taking a photograph of it in place and posting the photo on our blogs. I felt exhilarated carrying this Reverie out and heard the same excitement in others who did this. Remember that it’s never too late to do this exercise. Go on over to read the whole.

9:11 a.m. — This is what happens when I get distracted while visiting the sites I write about here: I stopped by Joseph’s and while scrolling down to the Reverie link, spotted his ‘Fairy Tale,’ which I have been meaning to comment on. Oh well, a quick minute… the phone rings. My son for our weekly chat. I wander back to the computer, finish the remark and look to see what else I need to do… Oh, Good God, I’m writing a blog post.

And, then there is Adele’s blog, where I get caught up in both the prompts and the comments. One of the lovely things about Adele’s blog is the links to specific poems, that she suggests, that connect to the prompt either as context, or example. The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several options revolving around stones. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are challenged with a photograph. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over. I have read several lovely responses to this photograph, already. Also, this fortnight’s interview is with mike Maher., so stop and read.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us she pulled the words from an article in Bon Appetit magazine. I’ll have to reread my copy. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. Not such an easy grouping this week.

Carry On Tuesday gives us a quotation from Robert Browning. To read it and several other quotations from Browning, head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. She calls it a humour blog for a reason. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph and a strange one. The effect is weird. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Peggy, this week. She wants us to put yourself in the place of someone whose concept of God and/or how the world works is different from yours. Go on over to see what else she says. The possibilities are endless and fascinating for this topic.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. The introduction made me laugh.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are fragrant, jostle, and remnant. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have Ella, who discusses a fascinating strategy for writing poems. She also talks about yet another book I must have. Head to the Garden to find out what. We also have Fireblossom Friday and a series of fascinating photographs centering on bodies. Visit to read the prompt. Check the rest of the week too. They have a lot going on, including an interview with Hedgewitch. Go play with the toads.

Happy Anniversary, We Write Poems and thank you for all the pleasure you give us. If you haven’t checked out the WWP tribute to its followers, go look.This week we are asked to give back, by sending a prompt we think will be fun for the group to play with in the months ahead.

At Poets United, we are asked to think about music, a topic that could take weeks, months, and we would still be conversing. For the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Meeting the Bar, their prompt says, Let’s take the challenge to be totally alive in the present and write to our perceptions. It says a lot more and for that you will need to visit. You will find, as you read the article a familiar theme, one which bears repetition.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual options. Sometimes I feel the need to share one of the options: boomers/mountain beavers. You know you want to find out. Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

Flash fiction fans: I love the photograph Hannah is offering us over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem. Hannah is good at that!

The final posting is for Trifecta, the correct Trifecta. I have given you the link to the Instructions page. They have an interesting shtick. Visit and find out what.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

Remember to throw your name in for the chance at a couple of free books of poetry for the Great Poetry Giveaway. I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt that should offer everyone’s particular favourite aspect [What? In one exercise? MUAHAHAHA] and I shall set some prep work for the following week. On Thursday I shall see you for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.Gird your loins: Poem a Day is almost upon you.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 30/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Prompts Rounded Up: Friday Freeforall

7:25 a.m. — Atlanta

Weekend! Well, almost and some of you are about fourteen hours closer. Yesterday, I saw the list of countries where you all live. I’m not sure why I was startled at the spread, but I like knowing the part of the earth everyone inhabits. Wordgathering has gathered several new readers recently; I’d like to extend a welcome and hope to hear your voices joining in.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she introduces us to Jack Gilbert and his poem ‘The Forgotten Dialect of the Heart’. She describes reading his poetry as, A feeling in the pit of the stomach, in the well of the throat, your whole body on the edge of something, not knowing whether it is about to fall or fly. I feel this way every time I read Jack Gilbert’s poetry. I read the poem and ordered his book. Go read. The prompts are fun, too.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries, titled ‘not enough time,’ says: What we’re going to do is akin to connect-the-dots: describe that significant event without describing it outright. The exercise is intriguing, as we are asked to focus on the insignificant as the significant event of the moment while it happens, while the significant fades into the background. Go on over to read the whole.

One of the lovely things about Adele’s blog is the links to specific poems, that she suggests, that connect to the prompt either as context, or example. The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several options revolving around our various ancestries, our different nationalities, our people – our “roots”. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are challenged to Write a “new” poem. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over. You don’t want to miss the contrast of Marie’s bunny poem and Walt’s ode :-) Also, this fortnight’s interview is with Janet Martin, so stop and read. In an embarrassment of riches, we also have a new form to play with, the Parallelogram de Crystalline. Yes, quite a mouthful, but a new form to play [new to me] with is always exciting.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us she pulled the words from the Montana Forensics Educator’s Association Committee Proposals — poems can be found anywhere! Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the first few words of Robert Louis Stevenson’s poem ‘My Shadow’. To read the line and for a link to read the poem, head over. Anything by Stevenson catapults me into my childhood.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

 

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph which made me think of a Charlie Chaplin movie.  The close-up is fascinating. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. She wants us to think about connections. If you think about it, we live the word in all its forms. Even to breathe is to connect to oxygen. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. If you don’t usually visit, go to see the lovely illustration of Joy.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are amateur, diligent, and nurture. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have Mary, who suggests we Think about some of the ordinary tasks, items, aspects, annoyances, joys of our lives. Head to the Garden to find out what to do with your thoughts. We also have Kenia’s Wednesday Challenge which introduces us to Manoel de Barros, a 94-year-old contemporary Brazilian poet. Go. Read his poetry. I am enchanted. Another poet I must have in my collection. So many, so many…  Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems asks us to write a fairy tale poem. Head on over to read the rest of the prompt, because, you know there is a rest of the prompt at WWP.

At Poets United, we are asked what we think of when we hear the word light. For some cool photographs and the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Poetics, their prompt goes hand in hand with We Write Poems. Visit to read the article and a chance to write, or rewrite, a fairy tale.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options. Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. I love the photograph Hannah is offering us over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

Enough? If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt (and prep work for the following week — this time you will get it); Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone. If I haven’t mentioned it in a while, I appreciate your visits and love ‘chatting’ with you when you do.

 

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 23/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Prompts Post: Friday Freeforall

9:41 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. I am a trifle late. Bad night. I’m glad to be back amongst the prompt sites. Let us see what we have.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she tells us: One writer I admire is Hannah Stephenson, who blogs daily at The Storialist. She writes a new poem each day inspired by art that she views on the Internet. (There is a fascinating video of her drafting process here.) I read her blog every day – I am always amazed by her ability not only to draft a poem daily, but to draft well. Donna gives us her favourite poem by Hannah, as well as a couple of suggestions for writing. This week, though, I think the important thing I am taking away is the poem’s theme. Visit.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries says: Obviously I won’t expect you to use Welsh for this prompt (though you are welcome to!), but we are going to try to hold fast to some of those old bardic forms. There is a regimented tradition of literary Welsh which is a beautiful thing; trying to shoehorn it into the English language will not be elegant, but we’re going to try anyway. Go on over to read the whole.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several options revolving around dancelet’s “dance a poem,” she says. Samuel Beckett wrote, “Dance first. Think later. It’s the natural order.” Adele gives us enough ideas to keep us in prompts for weeks.To read all the possibilities, and there are many, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are invited to Give yourself credit for what you’ve already accomplished, and give yourself permission to aim even higher. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us the words were lifted from “Life on Mars,” a television series. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening line and title of a song by Merle Haggard. To read the line and for a link to hear Dolly Parton sing the song, head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Olive Garden the theme this week is: Spring Break, Vacations, Favorite Colors, First Kiss. Next week will be Boating, Water, Mountains, and Birthday Parties. We seem to have lost the friendly welcoming atmosphere of the old garden. You will find the theme immediately on arriving on site. Then if you scroll down several poems, you will find the next week’s.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph which made me think of the way we see memories after a while. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Peggy, this week. She wants us to think about describing an emotion in a tangible way. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. We meet the link tool, or to be more precise Inlinkz. This is down to the ingenious, intelligent, Aris Korbetus, the name behind INLINKZ…..this week fellow bloggers not only is he writing a piece for our INTRODUCTION – he is also donating a Giveaway Amazon Voucher! Visit. If you win you might be able to buy more books!

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are baffle, elegant, and negate. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have Grace, who has written an article on the tanka form, and given us some lovely examples. The tanka is fun. Head to the Garden to give it a try. We also have A Word With Laurie which discusses perspective and its connection to our writing. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems says, Write a poem that expresses the concept of signs, or uses signs to tell a story. Head on over to read the rest of the prompt, because, you know there is a rest of the prompt at WWP.

At Poets United, we are asked to consider feathers. I don’t know about you, but feathers are one of those things like crayola crayons, blowing bubbles, and shells, the things that make me light up when I see them. For some cool photographs and the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Meeting the Bar, Charles Miller says, let’s take a poem or part of a poem and put it into the larger context of our lives, like Dante did. Sound interesting? Visit to read the article. It might appear long; okay, it is long, but worth the read. I wanted to be in a room with everyone to discuss it.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options. Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. I love the photograph Hannah is offering us over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

That should keep you out of the shops and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? Again, I thoroughly enjoyed last week’s and this week’s YS@TT. What else have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt on using motifs (and prep work for the following week); Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

PS I am only partly here, so please forgive anything that doesn’t work. Speaking of not working, WordPress seems to be giving commentors fits, if they are not WordPress users. If anyone knows what’s up, please post in the comments. I’ll look around and see what I can find.

 
14 Comments

Posted by on 16/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Prompts For Us: Friday Freeforall

7:24 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape where she has been having a crazy-busy week. In lieu of her usual, she offers a paragraph by Jane Hirshfield that says in part “Use your failures for paper.’ Meaning, I understood, the backs of failed poems, but also my life,” and a suggestion for what we might try for our own practice. Go on over and check it out, especially those of you who have been exploring prose.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries gives us permission to spend several hours in a coffee shop. Okay, anywhere, but that’s one possibility. He says: But there is another skill, character-building, that poetry can share with prose and other forms of writing as well. Visit Joseph to read the whole prompt. The exercise, like all of his, is important to developing our skills as writers, and it’s fun! Go on over to read the whole.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several intriguing possibilities revolving around dreams… or nightmares. One such is: or you might take on the persona of a dream and write as if you are a dream speaking. I don’t dream and I want to try this one. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are invited to: Write one more for the road! To find out more, even to read the clever title, and to read our hosts’ poems, head over.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us the words came from thin air. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening line and title of a love poem by Courtney Kuchta. To read the line and for a link to read the poem, head over.

Here comes my first smile of the day: Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Olive Garden the theme for one more week remains the military, soldiers, veterans, or poetry dealing with physical, mental, and emotional healing. The caretakers of the Garden were supposed to be back. I visited and see signs of life: they are now an olive garden. No new posting yet.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph. I left it wondering why the young man needs so many paper towels and  whether I can get close enough to read the soup labels. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. She wants us to write an Anaphora poem. It’s not as scary as it sounds. Most of us do this at some point and some of us love writing this type of poetry. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. We meet another contributor. I am enjoying meeting the different people who, well, people ABC Wednesday.Head over to meet ‘GiGi’ and this week’s letter.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are crinkle, demand, and navigate. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words. Crinkle. Love saying that word. Crinkle.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. It’s Fireblossom Friday, once again, and it’s all about people in uniforms. Head to the Garden to see the photographs. They have a fun collection. We also have the Wednesday Challenge which celebrates, what else, Happy Leap Day… toads, leap… you were there, right?

We Write Poems has invited us to a haibun party! Yay! Head on over to read the rest of the prompt.

At Poets United, we are told, Rebirth is change, growth, but it can mean so much more. For some seriously cool photographs and the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Poetics, Ami Mattison says I’d like to highlight a few observations about spoken word poetry as an aesthetic style, examine a specific example, and then offer an exercise for writing a successful spoken word poem. The article makes several important points, particularly about point of view. Even if you never plan to read your poetry aloud [I know, but once you start, it's addictive... still, scary as all get out.], the article is worth a read.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options… sea cucumbers, anyone? Visit for the other possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

Oh God, I should not have tried to figure out FF’s photograph. Those with vertigo problems, don’t peer too closely. I’m still clutching my desk. The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. Check the photograph [carefully, carefully] over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? I have thoroughly enjoyed last week’s and this week’s YS@TT. What else have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

Remember that I will be dark for a week. I shall see you Tuesday 13 March for our final prompt on place; Thursday for Part 2 of yesterday’s comments; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

San Antonio and little Miss Hazel, here comes Grandma. Happy writing, everyone.

 
9 Comments

Posted by on 02/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Prompts R Us: Friday Freeforall

7:34 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. Well! Clearly you were all sitting around and waiting for a can of worms question to be tossed into the crowd. Rather than answer each comment, which would require my stopping life as I know it, for a few days, I think what makes sense is for me to synthesise the comments and report to you in a week. That does not mean you should not go and read the responses, if you have not. A couple of people have gone back to look at other responses and written further. Meanwhile, let’s set up the writing week.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape where she shares with us the Decemberist song “Red Right Ankle”. We have the lyrics to read and to listen to. I read first and, while I listened, found myself impatient to return to reading the song again [I am highly visual]. I love Meloy’s structure and am excited about trying a poem based on “Red Right Ankle”. Head over to read the lyrics and see what Donna suggests we try.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries sends us on a memento hunt and gives us a process to do so, rather than saying, find ten memories… Joseph reminds us that One of the challenges of poetry is to use your emotional/memory connection to people, places, things, concepts, etc. to articulate the reaction they summon in you — and then to summon it up in other people. Not  an easy task this writer thing. Visit Joseph to read the whole prompt.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, challenges us to recall times in our later lives that recalled the childlike wonder of a special “first” or “first times/first experiences”.  To find out more, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we have a photograph and the title of the prompt to give us a start. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over. Hey, Marie Elena and Walt, can you believe you are bearing down on your site’s one year anniversary?!

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda says, this week’s words were selected at random from your contributions, then I added one more for a baker’s dozen. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening line of Auden’s “Funeral Blues”. To read the line and for a link to read, and hear the poem in a clip from Four Weddings and a Funeral, head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact. I smile as soon as I see the site next on my list.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for one more week is the military, soldiers, veterans, or poetry dealing with physical, mental, and emotional healing. The caretakers of the Garden are taking a three-week break and suggest that we post at any time during that period. They will return refreshed, March 1st.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image invites us to play with colour, if we wish, in addition to the possibility of story. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Peggy, this week. She asks us to consider the opening stanza of Williams’ “The Red Wheel Barrow” as a jumping off point. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. The introduction is particularly Funny this week, as we are given the story of Francine and her Frolicking.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are cancel, elastic, and labor. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words. Reading the definitions allows me to see possibilities and connections.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. Kenia offers a fascinating Wednesday Challenge which says, Write a poem that keeps a dialogue with another poem, or poet. Head to the Garden to read the rest of the prompt. We also have Mary’s Mixed Bag. Mary offers a strategy that is useful to have in the arsenal when the muse is wandering far afield.

We Write Poems stays with nature but offers a challenge to us: in your descriptive images the challenge is to use terms not the usual or obvious for that subject. Head on over to read the rest of the prompt.

At Poets United, we are asked to consider all the strings in our lives. Think about it, then for the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse, they want to introduce you to the poet you know as Blue Flute.  He has written an article for us today comparing Japanese and Chinese poetic forms and discussing how these can be adapted into English. The essay is fascinating and the challenge at the end, looks like fun. After all, we all do images, right? Now we are asked to write a connected series. Head to FormForAll to read the essay and the prompt.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us seven options, this week. One of the options offered us, is a speaking acquaintance with a tree. Visit for the other six possibilities.

The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. I love the photograph over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers one possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? As you saw, this week, if we offer the right ‘niggle’ everyone comes out to play. What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity at Thursday Thoughts.

See you Tuesday for an image prompt on place; next Thursday for a synthesis of yesterday’s comments; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
21 Comments

Posted by on 24/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posting Poetry Prompts: Friday Freeforall

7:32 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. I hope everyone is well, as we sashay into another weekend. February is flashing past. We have two new entrants to try, one poetry and one flash fiction [thank you, Paula].

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape where she shares with us an Elizabeth Bishop poem. Reading a Bishop poem is reason enough to visit and Donna’s suggestion for writing asks us to do some dreaming… maybe some wishing.

And I thought last week’s ‘Reverie‘ might be intimidating. Wait ’til you read this week’s. Joseph has us trying Viking verse. If you read it and fled, let me reassure you: yes, it is difficult and yes, you might pull some hair, but, like the phonetics exercise [and all the exercises Joseph gives us], what we learn from the struggle outweighs any frustration. If you haven’t tried yet, do. Don’t we all have a secret Viking in us? If you have and are shy to post, go read the ones that are there and remember: everything is a draft until you say it isn’t.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, is new this week. The prompt changes Saturdays, so visit quickly. This week’s prompt is intriguing as it asks us to think about things which haunt us. To find out what sorts of things and to explore the blog, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt ask us to consider morals. No, not ours, but those with which writers deal. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over.

At The Sunday Whirl, this week’s words come from Brenda’s husband and the true crime book he is reading. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening lines of Angel, by Sarah McLachlan. To read the line and for a link to hear the song, head over. Like last week’s line there are several possibilities, to include dividing the line, or using it as a refrain. You might want to avoid reading the lyrics until you have your own idea down.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact. I smile as soon as I see the site next on my list.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for the next few weeks is the military, soldiers, veterans, or poetry dealing with physical, mental, and emotional healing. The caretakers of the Garden are taking a three-week break and suggest that we post at any time during that period. They will return refreshed, March 1st.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. I don’t know about you, but I look forward to my weekly visit with great anticipation for what the magpie will bring in. This week’s image is fascinating. I had quite a visceral reaction to it. If you have not seen the image yet, be ready to jot down your immediate reactions/thoughts.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Chris, this week. She asks us a simple question about something that we, as poets, should be particularly aware of.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday gives us several things to play with aside from the week’s letter. The intro is an interview with Roger, one of the many contributors [and co-designer of the interview questions] and Roger gives us a couple of links for our Enjoyment. One is the most gorgeous photographs of hamburgers I have ever seen; the other a link to a song. If you are trying to avoid something, this will help you.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are angelic, foster, and ruin. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words. Reading the definitions allows me to see possibilities and connections.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. Grace offers a Wednesday Form which gives us a discussion of Haiku. While we seem to drown in haiku, sometimes, this is a good essay which Grace makes newly interesting because of her style and viewpoint. We have A Word With Laurie. This may have changed by the time you get to the Garden, as it is a Friday prompt, or she may be up earlier than I and have changed it already. To discover the word and the prompt, visit.

We Write Poems is taking us back into nature. Trees. So much we can do on the subject of trees. Head on over to read the rest of the prompt.

At Poets United, Ella is helping Robb out with the ‘Thursday Think Tank’ and suggests we write about home, this week. For the rest of the prompt head over.

‘Meeting the Bar’ over at dVerse, offers us a look at heroes with an interesting discussion, some things to look at regarding the writing about, and ‘Ulysses’ by Tennyson as an example of heroic form. Visit for a good read and the challenge.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her ‘Weekend Haiku & Limericks’ has the usual three options. Despite needing to get this post written and out, I always find myself checking the links for the three options. I mean, cannibalism and insect urban legends? Don’t you have to find out what else? It might be fun to connect the three choices in a poem.

The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. If you visit Flashy Fiction, you will find several names you will recognise among the contributors. While I was exploring, I found the variety of images offered fascinating and fun to see who chose what. Go on over and say hello and give it a try.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity at Thursday Thoughts.

See you Tuesday for a prompt on place; next Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
18 Comments

Posted by on 17/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  • creative commons license

  •  
    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 930 other followers