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Friday Freeforall: Prompts a la Groundhog Day

9:59 — Atlanta

Hello again. I have been over on another tab working on genealogy, or not working on it, as the internet keeps conking out. In one of the periodic connections, I read the comments to my earlier disclaimer (?). ViV had a brilliant suggestion: Put last week’s post up and people can go to the homepage for the latest prompts. I have done so. Don’t be confused when you think you have seen a prompt before. You have.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that says in part: Round things rule. And circles are also symbols of connection, of cycles, of continuing. So today we will use this simple shape to inspire a poem in one of four ways. To find out what those four ways are head over for the rest of the prompt.

Over at dVerse, they have: Today we are going to ask you to do the taboo and break the rules and do something most magazines frown upon and would not publish. You know you are going to check that out. When you get to the page, the exercise is down at the bottom after emmett wheatfall’s introduction. emmett will be writing commentary for the Poetics postings. You might want to bookmark his page.

Poetic Bloomings prompt saysYou were given a box of artifacts once belonging to your Great-Grandfather who you’ve never known. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt, and the poems by the hosts in response. Sounds like fun and the idea can be transferred to other ancestors, a famous person [you found the box at a garage sale], someone you thought you knew [until you saw the contents of the box...]

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are from ViV, who sent Brenda a wordle to use. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry on Tuesday gives the title from Mary Hopkins’ song Those Were the Days My Friend.  To hear the song, head over to the site for a link. I have it playing in the background as I type. I do love the songs from that time period.

Someone has a sense of humour. Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: Plan B. Should be fun to see what others wrote. And One Single Impression offers amuse, a contribution from Mad Kane, whom many of you know from her limerick blog.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James continues her sea themed offerings. Head over for a look and to explore.

Had a rough week? Need a laugh?  Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is to write a poem to do with Mythology. Head over to the site for background, examples, and links. And looking towards next week, they will focus on love and loss.

Visit Magpie Tales for another image prompt. This week they have an interesting photograph, which appears to include a magpie [alright, it could be any large black bird].

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday seems to be experiencing difficulties, but if you are keeping up or are particularly enamoured of the letter K, they have a comments section to post your poem or link. Of course, they may have changed their format. We will know next week.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are cherish, guarantee, and nausea. Well, that should result in some interesting poems. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems starts: We invite you to write using your “other” (non-primary) hand (right-handed folks, use your left, and likewise reversed if you’re left-handed please). Now there’s a challenge. I have already failed, but look forward to reading others’ results. Head over to read the rest of the prompt.

Poets United asks: What is red to you?  When you see the color or read the word what pops into your head?  It’s an easy enough word to write about.  Below you will see a few interesting facts about the color red. Read through them and let it stimulate your pen. I love the colour red. And, as you know, Robb gives us plenty in the way of possible paths. For the rest of the prompt and some photographs, visit.

Weekend Haiku has added limericks. What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic has to do with collecting and/or using quotes. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. At the moment I have prose poems  as a possible topic.

I shall see you next Tuesday for a form, really; and next Friday for another week’s roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 07/10/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Of Prompts and Poetry

7:38 a.m. — Atlanta

Cold front moving in. Love to see those numbers drop. Hello, all.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that says in part: Round things rule. And circles are also symbols of connection, of cycles, of continuing. So today we will use this simple shape to inspire a poem in one of four ways. To find out what those four ways are head over for the rest of the prompt.

Over at dVerse, they have: Today we are going to ask you to do the taboo and break the rules and do something most magazines frown upon and would not publish. You know you are going to check that out. When you get to the page, the exercise is down at the bottom after emmett wheatfall’s introduction. emmett will be writing commentary for the Poetics postings. You might want to bookmark his page.

Poetic Bloomings prompt saysYou were given a box of artifacts once belonging to your Great-Grandfather who you’ve never known. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt, and the poems by the hosts in response. Sounds like fun and the idea can be transferred to other ancestors, a famous person [you found the box at a garage sale], someone you thought you knew [until you saw the contents of the box...]

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are from ViV, who sent Brenda a wordle to use. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

Carry on Tuesday gives the title from Mary Hopkins’ song Those Were the Days My Friend.  To hear the song, head over to the site for a link. I have it playing in the background as I type. I do love the songs from that time period.

Someone has a sense of humour. Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: Plan B. Should be fun to see what others wrote. And One Single Impression offers amuse, a contribution from Mad Kane, whom many of you know from her limerick blog.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James continues her sea themed offerings. Head over for a look and to explore.

Had a rough week? Need a laugh?  Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is to write a poem to do with Mythology. Head over to the site for background, examples, and links. And looking towards next week, they will focus on love and loss.

Visit Magpie Tales for another image prompt. This week they have an interesting photograph, which appears to include a magpie [alright, it could be any large black bird].

For you alliterationists out there,  ABC Wednesday seems to be experiencing difficulties, but if you are keeping up or are particularly enamoured of the letter K, they have a comments section to post your poem or link. Of course, they may have changed their format. We will know next week.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are cherish, guarantee, and nausea. Well, that should result in some interesting poems. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems starts: We invite you to write using your “other” (non-primary) hand (right-handed folks, use your left, and likewise reversed if you’re left-handed please). Now there’s a challenge. I have already failed, but look forward to reading others’ results. Head over to read the rest of the prompt.

Poets United asks: What is red to you?  When you see the color or read the word what pops into your head?  It’s an easy enough word to write about.  Below you will see a few interesting facts about the color red. Read through them and let it stimulate your pen. I love the colour red. And, as you know, Robb gives us plenty in the way of possible paths. For the rest of the prompt and some photographs, visit.

Weekend Haiku has added limericks. What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. Head over to see what I mean.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic has to do with collecting and/or using quotes. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. At the moment I have prose poems  as a possible topic.

I shall see you next Tuesday for a form [yes, I am studying]; and next Friday for another week’s roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 30/09/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Prompting Poets and Poetry

8:00 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello one and all. We continue to be wet on the East Coast but the temperature is dropping. Yay!

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that says in part: Choose an “old-fashioned” poetry form: sonnet, limerick, haiku, ballade… Once you have chosen a form, write in that form using at least four or five pop culture references. Sounds challenging but fun, as most challenges in writing are. Head over for the rest of the prompt.

Over at dVerse, they have: The challenge for today is to write a train related poem. This could be a poem about famous trains like the Orient Express, this could also be about traveling in general, about arriving, departing or some train station story, train history and of course you could also use the train as a metaphor. That’s a lot of possibilities, and maybe some research, but that’s fun too. Visit for the rest of the prompt.

Poetic Bloomings prompt saysThe world is full of surprises. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt,  and the poems by the hosts in response, which each provide surprises, delightful in different ways.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are taken from several contributors. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done. I can’t wait to see how people use the word sheep.

Carry on Tuesday gives the opening line from Howard Jacobson’s novel The Finkler Question: He (She / I) should have seen it coming. The host also suggests trying our hand at fiction if we wish, but stresses that poetry, as ever, is welcome. For more on the novel, head over to the site for a link.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: easy. Might be interesting to check the word’s origins, or its other meanings. And One Single Impression offers betrayal, which offers possibilities for literal or metaphorical use. We have all felt betrayal. It can be a tiny thing and the definition is personal, different to different people. And, we have probably all betrayed. That’s another possibility for a perspective.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James offers a photograph of a cluster of small boats at dock. She presents it in a brand new blog theme, which looks quite snazzy! Head over for a look and to explore.

Now for the blog that makes me smile just thinking about it. Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is to write an object poem. Head over to the site for background, examples, and links. And looking towards next week, they will focus on Mythology.

Visit Magpie Tales for another image prompt. This week they have a Rousseau painting. I adore Rousseau’s style which allows for serious and lighthearted approaches.

For you alliterationists out there, Time to JUMP on board the ABC Wednesday train again. Head over to enjoy a Sesame Street video. Yeah, I know you can’t resist that.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are dull, race, and yawn. This week I think the challenge will be to not go for the obvious connection. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word. My mind is beginning to view these as mini-wordles.

We Write Poems says: Fe-fi-fo-fum, I smell poem pie! What a gorgeous image. In another reader inspired prompt, we are encouraged to focus on our sense of smell. Head over to read the rest of the prompt.

Poets United asks: What is your rain fantasy? I love the question. But, as you know, Robb gives us far more in the way of possible paths. For the rest of the prompt and some photographs, visit.

Mr. Knowitall has entirely too much fun over at Friday Flash 55.

Weekend Haiku has added limericks. What I like about this particular blog is that they focus us in an unusual way. I try to give parts of prompts, so that people will visit sites, but if you haven’t been to this one, let me give you a specific example this week: feature one of the subjects discussed here in the past seven days, including crows, police, tickets, teenagers, or something from Monday’s nature quote. Now, admit you are a little intrigued…

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ has not been updated this week. I’ll keep an eye out.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic has to do with why any of us write. It is fun to see the different reasons people give, so if you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you next Tuesday possibly for a form. There are so many sites doing forms now, I am reluctant to be another. Yet, I want to give you the different forms, myself. Maybe we can think of it as the first site you try a form for is the teeth-gnashing attempt, and the second site is where you know you have written in the form once and can now focus on what you are writing, as well as how.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 23/09/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Gather Ye Prompts While Ye May

10:04 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello one and all. We continue to be wet on the East Coast and to be dodging the occasional tornado. Signs of autumn are more signs of summer ending than autumn starting, but that’s okay.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that starts with: As someone who pays a LOT of attention to how words sound, I have always had a soft spot for homophones. So today, we will explore several ways to play with these sound-alike words. For those with an ear, and those who are developing an ear, this is a fun exercise to play with so go over to read the different possibilities Donna offers.

Over at dVerse, they have another interesting tack this week: For today’s Poetics, the silent film era is your prompt.  You could write about one of the actors, compare and contrast silent films with present-day movies, or maybe write a parody of one of the above scenes. The site offers plenty of resources on silent films along with a short discussion. This is a prompt idea that can provide inspiration over and over.

Poetic Bloomings‘ prompt says: This week you are asked to take the title from an article from any magazine or periodical you may read or have access to and make that the title of your new poem. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt, which includes a bonus prompt, and the poems by the hosts in response. You might also mosey around to their form post.

Over at The Found Poetry Review they are asking us to focus on 9/11. No matter the degree to which you were or were not affected, their links are to narratives, from which some powerful poetry can be written

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are taken from Jack Kerouac’s refrigerator.Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

The idiom, Home is where the heart is, provides the kick off for Carry on Tuesday. For a link to read more idioms, head over to Carry on Tuesday.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: tomorrow. A look into a possible future, or a list poem of resolutions… And One Single Impression offers weed, which offers possibilities for literal or metaphorical use.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James offers a publishing opportunity. If you like writing responses to photographs, head on over and see what she has to say.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week changed to free verse based on a topic of your choice. And looking towards next week, they will focus on Summer VacationsGrandparents,  and Anniversaries.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week they have a another photograph. I sat and looked at it for quite a while, noting details, speculating, wondering…Like last week’s photo, you can speculate on the story behind it, or write a poem about a detail, or a poem of place.

For you alliterationists out there, here is ABC Wednesday‘s letter for this week: All hail the H! Even if you don’t usually visit, go over this week, as the writer of the introduction has had such fun and given us several sites to visit and enjoy.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are erode, heart, and observe. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word. My mind is beginning to view these as mini-wordles.

We Write Poems says: Barbara (Briarcat, as we know her!) asks us this week to B1 (be one, you get it?).  She suggests, re-invent yourself for a few minutes.  Imagine yourself somehow different.  Smarter maybe, or drop-dead-gorgeous.  Brash or shy or EVIL. I know this intrigues you, so head over for the rest of the instructions.

Poets United says: A window is often used to describe many things, an opening to your soul, a gateway to beyond, a way to let the cat out. For the rest of the prompt and to read what Robb has to say about a slightly different structure for posting responses, visit.

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ gives us: Lambda. Susan writes flash fiction with the two words she chooses for each letter, but there is no reason you can’t use the words for a poem. Head over to read the origins of the two words and the Greek letter with which they start.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic continues to focus on the experience of critique. This is the third week, a Part 3, and an aspect important to all of us who write. If you have not had a chance to go over, and are interested in being a part of a critique group, that is what is being discussed now. We should all have something to say about this topic, so if you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you next Tuesday or the Tuesday after.  Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 09/09/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Peanuts, Crackerjacks, Poetry Prompts

10:04 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello one and all. East Coasters, I hope everyone survived Irene and that you and yours are drying out. Down Unders, congratulations on Spring arriving here and there.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that starts with: Rain can be tricky for poets. To find out why and so what, head over to the Tow Truck and check out the rest of the prompt.

Over at dVerse, they have an interesting tack this week that fits in with Elizabeth’s discussion topic over at Writers Speakto try your hand at not only receiving critique, but in giving it too. Even just a line – expressed however you feel, or can – pointing to an aspect/point of phrasing you feel could be improved on. Here is your chance to practice, both giving and receiving. Grab it with both hands.

Poetic Bloomings‘ prompt says, in part,Your poem will be a night poem. To remind yourself of aspects of night you may not have thought of visit the site to read the rest of the prompt and the poems by the hosts in response.

Nothing new at The Found Poetry Review but, if you have not checked them out, there is no reason to not wander over. I have given the link for their prompt page.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle are taken from several wordle writers. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

The title and first line of a poem by Jessie Lucas: Love is like a river provides the kick off for Carry on Tuesday. For a link to read the poem head over to Carry on Tuesday.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: muse. There are a number of definitions. The site provides a link. It might be fun to work on a poem using muse in its various forms. And One Single Impression offers wheat, which is certainly different. The site provides a definition and the etymology, which might give an idea of where to go with this.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James is back with a photograph that provides several possible directions in which to go. Pun? What makes you ask?

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is Klimt’s The Kiss. Even if you don’t participate, this might be a fun one to visit and read some responses. The post also provides some background about the painting. And looking towards next week, they will focus on an object poem.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week they have a gorgeous photograph. I sat and looked at it for quite a while, noting details, speculating, wondering…You can speculate on the story behind it, or write a poem about a detail, or a poem of place.

For you alliterationists out there, here is ABC Wednesdays letter for this week: G

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are drag, mumble, and penetrate. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word. And what a lovely challenge, to use the word mumble with its strong sound aspect, in a non-cliched manner.

We Write Poems says: This week we invite you to make place the focal point of your poem. And, they suggest a structure which reads much like a treasure hunt and we know how we feel about treasure hunts! Place is important to poets and this prompt allows us to explore in detail what it means to each of us specifically.

Poets United has their photo prompt this week and the focus is a sunflower. Go on over to look at it and to read what Ella has to say.

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ gives us: Kappa. Susan writes flash fiction with the two words she chooses for each letter, but there is no reason you can’t use the words for a poem. Head over to read the origins of the two words and the Greek letter with which they start.

And here is Mr Knowitall’s Friday Flash 55. He is having fun with us this week. If you aren’t sure what this is about go over and read a few examples. It’s quite a challenge.

For you lovers of the say it in as few words as possible, here is Haiku Friday. They offer a guiding focus which is quite unusual.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic asks us how we feel about the experience of critique. This is the second week, a Part 2, and an aspect important to all of us who write. We should all have something to say about this topic, so if you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt about what is meaningful to each of us, Thursday I will be discussing an aspect of word choice and asking for your input, and next Friday will be more of the same. Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 02/09/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Come and Get Your Poetry Prompts

8:40 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. I hope all is well as we head into the weekend. Those who live on the East Coast of the United States, I hope you have battened down your hatches.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and a prompt that asks the age old question: What did you do on your summer vacation? By now you know that Donna never leaves us with just a question. To find out the steps and the twist, head over to the Tow Truck and check out the rest of the prompt.

Over at dVerse, they have a guest, Matt Quinn, who many of us know as Poemblaze. He has taken on teaching us the sestina form. We will be tackling that form here, but not for a few weeks. It never hurts to try, or retry, a form several times. So plunge in.

Poetic Bloomings‘ prompt asks us to write about change. Change is inevitable, maybe surer than death and taxes. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt and the poems by the hosts in response.

Over at The Found Poetry Review they ask us to try writing a cento or other found poem derived from the poems of Philip Levine. For more on the prompt, and for links to help, visit. If I remember rightly, we all love centos, so have fun.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. The words for this week’s wordle were taken from Charles Bukowski’s set of electronic poetry words. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done.

The title, Time to Say Goodbye, is this week’s phrase. For a link to read the lyrics and hear them sung head over to Carry on Tuesday.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: shipwreck. One can have fun with that. You can take an eco- slant, or go for childhood dreams of pirates, or use the word as a metaphor. And One Single Impression offers obsession, which one can go at seriously, or tongue in cheek.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James is on holiday. She will be back in early September.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Remember, Jingle Poetry has incorporated itself into its sister site The Gooseberry Garden.  The theme for this week is Adam and Eve. Even if you don’t participate, this might be a fun one to visit and read some responses. And looking towards next week, we will focus on Klimt’s The Kiss.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week they have an old photograph. You can speculate on the story behind it, or write a portrait poem, or a dialogue poem.

For you alliterists out there, here is ABC Wednesdays letter for this week: We are asked to have FUN FUN FUN, everyone, for the rest of the summer. Be Festive, Fabulous, Flirty, and Fascinating! Go on over to read the entire F introduction.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are adapt, glide, and lie. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems has a fun form from Amy over at Sharp Little Pencil. Visit We Write Poems for the instructions, and Amy for an example.

Poets United asks us: Today close your eyes and inhale. Take a whiff of the world around you. Close your eyes and think back to your favorite smell or even your dreaded ones.They always have more to help us choose possible paths. Robb is particularly good with guiding questions, so go over and read the rest of the prompt and view the photographs.

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ gives us: Theta. While Susan is on vacation, if you are doing this challenge and have fallen behind, or want to check it out, this is the latest letter. Susan writes flash fiction with the two words she chooses for each letter, but there is no reason you can’t use the words for a poem. Head over to read the origins of the two words and the Greek letter with which they start.

And here is Mr Knowitall’s Friday Flash 55. If you aren’t sure what this is about go over and read a few examples. It’s quite a challenge.

For you lovers of the say it in as few words as possible, here is Haiku Friday. They offer a guiding focus which is quite unusual.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic asks us how we feel about the experience of critique. We should all have something to say about this topic, so if you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for a new form, Thursday I will be discussing an aspect of word choice and asking for your input, and next Friday will be more of the same. Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 26/08/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Freeforall: Poetry Prompts and More Poetry Prompts

7:40 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello all. I hope you have had a good week and will have a relaxing weekend. I think I have forgotten how to do this. Let’s see…

We start, as always, with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck and an intriguing prompt that says in part: Today, we will write a poem that goes against our natures and create an evil twin. How fun does that sound?! To find out the steps, head over to the Tow Truck and check out the rest of the prompt.

We have a new entrant. Some of you have discovered dVerse, but if you haven’t, take a look. This is a new site that promises to be an exciting part of our lives. This week we are asked to tackle a big theme. To get to the prompt, you can go to the end of the article and find it, or read the article and come to it naturally.

Poetic Bloomings‘ prompt starts with: There is always a lyric from a song that stays with you. Visit the site to read the rest of the prompt and the poems by the hosts in response. And, the site has moved, if you have it bookmarked.

The next site is The Sunday Whirl. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read up on how it works, if you wish to post responses. Otherwise, enjoy a weekly wordle and be sure to go over to see what others have done. Brenda has moved over to WordPress, if any of you have her site bookmarked.

Over at The Found Poetry Review they ask us to write about SPAM (food or electronic). For more on the prompt, and for links to help, visit. All you spam eaters, I know you’re out there — pan-fried spam and eggs and toast, yum!

An eye for an eye will make the whole world go blind. Words of Gandhi. For more of his sayings, head over to Carry on Tuesday.

Sunday Scribblings’ prompt is: forward. You might look up the root word which offers more possibilities than what we tend to associate with the word. And One Single Impression offers silence which has so many possibilities on so many levels, I could spend months on the word.

At Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Sunday Snaps’ Susan May James is on holiday. She will be back in early September.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I enjoy the whole site more every week and find myself wandering around reading and grinning at the clever limericks. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides.

Everyone seems to be moving. Jingle Poetry has incorporated itself into its sister site The Gooseberry Garden. I have to admit I shall miss the name Jingle.  The theme for this week is Passionate Nights of Love. And looking towards next week, we will have Adam and Eve — that could be fun.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week they have painting equipment, as in painting walls. As with any image, you can be literal about what you see, or head into the metaphorical.

For you alliterists out there, here is ABC Wednesdays letter for this week: Here @ ABC Wednesday we always try to ENCOURAGE our happy contributors each week……do you have an idea for an introduction? Exactly, the letter E. And, it looks like ABC is giving us the opportunity to play with and add to the wonderful introductions they have. Haven’t you wanted to try to write an alliterative piece where you can go whole hog?

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are gasp, mute, and viable. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems has a prompt from me this week! In part it says: To write thirteen different views of the same item will require looking closely, turning the thing around, upside down, micro, macro, and way out of the box. The key is the object you pick and writing down every single association you can think of. Okay, enough groaning. I have to come up with a second one.

Poets United asks us Now I know my ABCs what type of poem will you share with me? The prompt, if taken literally, is not that easy but promises to be rewarding play. They always have more to help us choose possible paths, so go over and read the rest of the prompt and view the photographs.

Scribble & Scatter’s ‘Alpha to Omega Thursdays‘ gives us: Theta. While Susan is on vacation, if you are doing this challenge and have fallen behind, or want to check it out, this is the latest letter. Susan writes flash fiction with the two words she chooses for each letter, but there is no reason you can’t use the words for a poem. Head over to read the origins of the two words and the Greek letter with which they start.

And here is Mr Knowitall’s Friday Flash 55. If you aren’t sure what this is about go over and read a few examples. It’s quite a challenge.

For you lovers of the say it in as few words as possible, here is Haiku Friday.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She will post new topics every week around Friday. This week’s topic asks us how we feel about the comments we receive in our blog posts. We should all have something to say about this topic, so if you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions ask. If you write in response to any of these, both the people whose blogs you visit and I would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources.

I shall see you Tuesday for an open prompt, Thursday I am off [unless I have shaken the tiredness], and next Friday for more of the same. Happy writing, everyone.

 
21 Comments

Posted by on 19/08/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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