RSS

Poetry Freeforall — Remember

first photo 38:02 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to Seals & Crofts singing King of Nothing

Hello, all.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the image with its photograph of two red shoes, oddly compelling. Check out their other prompts for the week.adele kenny

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele has a guest prompter, this week: Me.It was odd to arrive at her site and see me. I had forgotten, briefly. At any rate, the prompt focuses on a sense of place and I talk more than usual, as I discuss what a sense of place entails. Visit.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready. They are an interesting collection, sourced from a Naomi Shihab Nye piece. Go on over.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stacy is giving us one of her guided prompts. I love these. Even if you are feeling at your least creative, if you follow the steps, you will have a poem. You can take it from there. Stacy is good at these, so see what she says about summer. Visit.

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us an exquisite artwork by Ulrike Bolenz. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole. Take a look.

Found Poetry Review The FPR’s focus is graduation speeches: select any current or past speech. If you are attending a graduation, jot down notes to reuse later. Beth provides several links for us to look for a source text. Head over.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are personal truths, stranded, and sunflowers.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Fireblossom talks lists. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us happiness as our motif. Visit to read the examples she has chosen, to inspire us, especially a brief video of Alfred Hitchcock defining happiness.

Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge I love the black and white photograph Jeremy has and found myself already working on one of the phrases he gives us this week. Check out the possibilities.sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with blue.

dverseOver at dVerse I have left the choice to you. When you arrive at the site, scroll down a bit and you will see the choices for the week. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for an image prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on 22/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetics Serendipity

8:06 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to `Auhea Wale Ana `Oe sung by Keali Reichel

Hullo, all. Many of you will be getting ready for the Memorial Day weekend. We are driving down to Florida for some R&R at my brother’s and sister-in-law’s place. John loves to cook a Chinese feast, so every time we go down, we know that treat is waiting. Four new dishes, this time! Speaking of dishes… okay, that segue is not going to work. Let’s see what we have on the menu. There we go.

1] The first is an article I read earlier this week. Will it help your writing? Probably not. But, I knew, half-way through, that I would post ‘The Bizarre, Complicated Formula for Literary Fame,’ written by Joshua Rothman for the New Yorker. (I came across the article thanks to Peter Murphy’s newsletter.) I found its topic fascinating and beautifully written (it is so good to read something well-written).

What is it about? Rothman says: Jackson never denies the excellence of Wordsworth’s poems, or the brilliance of the novels of Jane Austen, whom she also writes about. But she does show, convincingly, that a number of other factors, some of them quite bizarre, help literary fame to endure. It’s a good read and won’t take you long.

2] Again with thanks to Peter Murphy (it is a particularly good newsletter, this month), another article worth reading. You know all the poetry is dead, poetry is dying, there’s no place for poetry stuff? Jennifer Benka, executive director of The Academy of American Poets has written, for The Huffpost, ‘National Poetry Month Ends and the Great Work Begins,’ in which she takes on the nay-sayers and doom prophets.

While the article centres on the American poetry scene, I’m guessing much of what Benka says, holds true around the world: …poets today, especially younger poets, seem comfortable working beyond binaries and with a greater appreciation for fluidity and genre blurring in their poems. 

Poets who had focused on publishing in print, are now making videos and podcasts of their work. Poets who came of age on the slam stage are publishing books. Poets have seized the fact that poems are highly shareable art objects.

3] Someone at Poets & Writers has put together a tremendous database of Creative Writing Contests. While most of us are probably not going to enter, some of us might. Whichever way, the database is an interesting stroll. We are given: Entry fee, genre, cash prize, prize includes, and application deadline. There is a search function that includes several perspectives to search from. Note that there are twelve pages.

4)

by Mick Stevens

by Mick Stevens

 

I’ll see you tomorrow for the roundup; Tuesday for our image prompt; and Thursday for more links and things.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on 21/05/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Poem Tryouts: Let’s Change It Up

8:04 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Snow Patrol singing Chasing Cars

WHY, why, why must people change things that work fine? Hello, there. I just came from my Google Play Music. Someone decided on a new look. Pretty colours, almost unusable. For a cleaner look everything has been double-spaced. The result is like having a permanent zoom shot and never being able to see more than a few items. Worse: because of the resizing and different theme, only the first words of titles can be read. Useless. Not that I can do anything. That’s where I like my music (do not mention i-tunes).

Hi, again. Thank you. I would never have been able to settle down without a rant. HOWEVER, guess what the prompt is about now. I will resist going philosophical, as we have been philosophical enough lately, and we will make ‘change’ a word prompt. That way those who wish to be philosophical can be.

I was fascinated, as I so often am, when I looked up the etymology, to find that the Latin root for change means to barter, to ex-change one thing for another. Think about it, almost everything we use change for has exchange implicit. When you arrive at the dictionary I’m sending you to, note that ‘exchange’ is the third meaning. Look again at the first two. They both mean to change one thing for another, exchanging.

Hmmm. My computer is acting up. I’d better get this posted.

Look at the meanings for change. You can do one of a number of things:

Choose a meaning you don’t usually think of — ringing a change of bells, the change in your purse — and use it in a poem.

Or, you can pick several synonyms, all of which you use in a poem. The challenge is to choose synonyms that don’t necessarily sound as if they are.

Or, you can do a counterpoint poem: Two stanzas, one pro-change, one anti-change. You can also do the pro- anti- thing with your own idea for structure.

Or, you can think of a tiny change in your life that turned out to be a turning point, and write the scenario, or a reflection.

Or, you can go sci-fi and speak to future changes you foresee, and the effect of a change, or changes. You can have fun with this one.

Or, you can do your thing regarding change, because you had an idea as soon as I started talking.

I will see you Thursday for links; Friday for the week’s roundup of prompts; and next Tuesday for our image prompt.

Happy writing, all.

 

 
34 Comments

Posted by on 19/05/2015 in exercises, poems, poetry

 

Tags: , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall — And, Again

first photo 37:42 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to America (to a backing chorus of the dish washer) sung by Neil Diamond

Hello, all.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is Heeding haiku with HA — the prompt involves Debussy and a piece of his music. Check out their other prompts for the week.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele has a post for the files: What Editors Look For. If publishing adele kennypoems is part of your goal it’s not a bad idea to think about what makes particular poems compelling enough to publish, she writes. I thought it might be interesting to poll some poetry journal publishers and poetry editors (print and electronic) to gather some ideas about the qualities of poetry that editors want for their journals. Not only do we hear from several editors, but we have magazines to check out.

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. For her return prompt, Stacy has a photograph. I found myself staring at it for quite a while. Take a look.

 

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales gives us a photograph. Interesting. Remember, as with any image prompt, you can focus on one aspect rather than the whole.

Found Poetry Review Recovering: Stand by.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are mothers, alternate future, and made of glass.  Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads Marian offers a musical prompt with a Seussian touch. Check it out.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Sumana gives us waves as our motif. Visit to read the examples she has chosen, to inspire us.sasha

We have a new contender, Jeremy’s Weekly Challenge, on Thursdays. I have looked at several of Jeremy’s past prompts and they are fun because he gives us many possibilities. We have possible themes, poetic lines, and images. Choose one, two, or mix a bunch. He asks for both poetry and flash fiction, depending on what strikes you. Go on over and ‘meet’ him. Try a prompt.

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Head over to see what she does with philosophy.

dverseOver at dVerse Bjorn talks to us about antithesis. It’s an interesting discussion and always a fun topic to deal with in a poem. To the bar!

See you Tuesday for one of my prompts; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 15/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetics Serendipity

7:35 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to — you’re not going to believe me — Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow! sung by Lena Horne. This is what happens when I put my entire library on shuffle mode.

Hello, all. Are you reclaiming your lives after April? Let me give you a few roads to wander down, now that you have so much free time.

1] I post the first with the knowledge that we know these things. Yet, I like Mary Norris’ style. I like what she says and how she says it. The article is a short one and, while pointed at prose writers, everything in it applies to the writing of poetry, particularly if you are attempting a haibun, or a prose poem.

Not to be confusing, the article, introduces Norris’ first book, Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen, is in the magazine The Writer and is written by Jeff Tamarkin. However, he quotes Norris, copy editor for The New Yorker, and the points are made by her. She pretty much had me, but when I read: Punctuation is sometimes for pacing but above all for clarity, I was sold.

2] Many of you, at this moment, may be casting around for help with a first chapbook. The article What Is a Chapbook?‘, by poet and editor E. Kristin Anderson, can be found at her website Write All the Words! and is worth a read if you are a little foggy as to what a chapbook is. Anderson asks and answers a set of questions she often hears and keeps the answers short and to the point.

3] I am constantly on the look-out for sources of free images. The following article ‘15 Sources for Legal & Free Images‘ by Ann of Live Grow Write, gives us a list, complete with a review of each site. She says: You are getting the details; pros & cons, what you can expect to find, licensing detail, attribution requirements, quality of images, and goes on to suggest we read her other articles on the topic of using images.

I did and (aside from Ann’s love of bright pink for words she wants to make sure we see — it’s very bright) found, for the first time, clear definitions and explanations of all those wonderful terms we come across such as Royalty Free, Creative Commons, Public Domain…the explanations are blessedly short and Ann’s style laid back. I’m keeping these articles on speed dial.

We’ll stop there, as the three topics are fairly hefty, as far as giving thought to their subject matter. I will see you tomorrow for the roundup of this week’s prompts; Tuesday for my weekly prompt; and Thursday for more links — should you come across articles you think we would enjoy, or need to read, send the links along to me. They do not have to be current. Writing is timeless with some things.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
10 Comments

Posted by on 14/05/2015 in links, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , ,

Poem Tryouts: To Succeed and To Fail

7:46 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to The Today Show, waiting for David Duchovny and his backing band, Weather

Hello, everyone. I love it when I derail my own planned prompts. I follow a band called Weather. I follow them because the band was formed with two of my former students. One of them is off doing great things musically, in Africa. The other is still with the band, which happens to be David Duchovny’s backing band on his first album. They are on The Today Show, this morning, and the latest incarnation of Kathy & Regis, tomorrow. Yes, the prompt.

I got to thinking about success during awake moments last night. What is a measure of success? The band, Weather, stayed together after graduation from college, they tour regularly, and now, they are backing Duchovny on his first album (which leads to them being on television). Sounds successful to me, but what happens if their goal was to not get into the more wearying strata of the music world? Can they count their good fortune (and hard work) as failure? Is success always a good thing? Are there degrees of success?

What is failure? Is it always a bad thing? Maybe failure in one thing leads to new paths which turn out to be what you really wanted to do, but didn’t know it. Are there degrees of failure?

Our entire lives are measured by successes, or failures. Either we do the measuring, or someone, a teacher, a boss, does the measuring, or a larger group, a committee, a population of voters, does the measuring. From the moment we wake, ‘I didn’t sleep well last night’ to the moment we go to bed , ‘I made the steaks just right. Another second and…’ we measure.

Oy! Too much philosophising with only one cup of coffee. I was clearer in my head, last night. However, I know you. You’ll take this and run, even while wondering what the heck I am talking about.

Main point for you to focus on: Convey to us a truth about success, or failure. This can involve something personal, or something you saw, or something you read. You can deal with one, or both. You can be somewhat abstract, or entirely concrete.

I will see you Thursday for links and things; Friday for the week’s roundup of links; and next Tuesday for our next prompt.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
24 Comments

Posted by on 12/05/2015 in exercises, poems, poetry

 

Tags: , , ,

Poetry Freeforall — Let’s Go. You Can Do It.

first photo 3Out of my way. I’m late, I’m late, for a very important… Oh, you’re the date and I’m only a couple of hours behind: 9:45 a.m.– Atlanta

listening to They Can’t Take That Away From Me sung by Robbie Williams

Hello, all. No niceties. We’re late! We’re off!

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is Tale Weaver’s — the prompt involves documents of any sort and will work for regular and found poetry. Check out their other prompts for the week.sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirligig has our Wordle words ready.

pink girl ink

 Pink.Girl.Ink. Stand by.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog: Adele gives us a prompt that is particularly important to what we do. This week, she asks us to deal with last lines. She has many examples (There are a couple where I’m going to seek out the poem), and the tips and dos and don’ts that make her prompts mini-workshops. Head over.

Feeling blue? Need a laugh? Need warming up? You need to read a limerick or two. Make tracks to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Read several. They are in the comments so you don’t even have to leave the page. One advantage to writing a limerick is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out — read several, write one.magpie

Magpie Tales  Either people are slow in coming back from April, or they don’t know what to do with this photograph. Remember that you do not have to write about the whole, or write about the image directly. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, I have been denied access. If anyone knows if the site has gone private, let me know.

 

FPR-200

Found Poetry Review Recovering: Stand by.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are bard, found objects, and digital poetry. A whole little poem right there. Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

At imaginary garden with real toads grapeling offers a word list drawn from the works of Neruda. Go play with the toads.

At Poets United Midweek Motif Susan gives us honouring our elders as our motif. Visit to read the examples Susan has chosen. sasha

At The Happy Amateur Sasha explains wikems. Stand by.

dverseOver at dVerse Bjorn talks to us about metaphor and cliché. The post is a week ago, but the piece is worth a read, if you haven’t done so, so head to the bar. They have Moscow Mules this week.

That should keep you busy. I shall see you Tuesday for one of my prompts; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the roundup of the week’s prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
12 Comments

Posted by on 08/05/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  • creative commons license

  •  
    Follow

    Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

    Join 1,091 other followers